Why do people online leave after a single match???

Oz o:

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This question is going to bite me until the end of time, so I may as well just ask, because I really, really don't get it sometimes. Like, if the other person doesn't have an unplayable connection, or they aren't playing in an absolutely obnoxious way (i.e spamming Falcon Kick), what excuse do you really have? I feel it's not even coincidence anymore, because 50% of my opponents leave whether I win or lose. I'm a legitimately solid player, I never spam, play lame (unlike literally every other wifi Zelda), I do cool **** and I've even had actual good matches with people for them to leave, or say "well played" and still leave after a single match.

If I played someone that's even remotely solid of a player, I'll play them like 10 times in a row, whether I win or lose. Even if I 3-stock someone, I still play them again because I'd think it's unfair to leave them without a chance.

So, what is it? I really need to know.
 
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MilkCalf

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GSP lowers a lot more when you lose than it increases when you win, so most people don't stick around when they think they'll lose again.
 
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Oz o:

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I get it.

So rather than improve or even have good battles, people would rather settle for a bunch of silly points on a screen.
 
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MilkCalf

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That's just how self esteem is for a lot of people. Doesn't help that it keeps being shown every time you select quickplay and changes after every match with visual and auditory stimuli.
 

Oz o:

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Doesn't help that it keeps being shown every time you select quickplay and changes after every match with visual and auditory stimuli.
I don't undertsand. What do you mean?
 

Wario Wario Wario

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Nobody has all the time in the world to play Smash, even during quarantine - they might have a job, other games to play, a family to be with or it may even be as simple as them being impatient.
 
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MilkCalf

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I don't undertsand. What do you mean?
It's supposed to be a direct value for how gold you are as a player, thus having it decrease or be low can bring people down.
 

Freduardo

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Lot of the time it’s because people have lives. Sometimes it’s the “dinner bell”, sometimes it’s parents, sometimes it’s friends, sometimes it’s siblings, sometimes it’s spouses, and sometimes it’s children.

But everyone has a reason why “this one is my last one” where your random opponent doesn’t come into play.

And sometimes they just don’t like your playstyle and don’t want to risk a loss to someone they don’t think is worthy to give them one and wins for that character are often viewed as luck (why yes, I do main Little Mac).
 

GhostM

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I feel like most do it because there is no real incentive to continue playing the same person over and over. Once the match is over, most people who do win don’t rematch because their opponents will learn to adapt and will most likely beat them, and for those who do lose they don’t rematch because they don’t want to lose more GSP after the first loss. There is no system that rewards nor promotes you to stay in matches, so most end up leaving after the first match.

Not to forget that sometimes people want to avoid certain play styles or certain connections if the match was laggy, although it’s not always because of the match/opponents, since it can be simple reasons like eating dinner.
 

Spiny Top

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GSP lowers a lot more when you lose than it increases when you win, so most people don't stick around when they think they'll lose again.
What I’ve noticed is playing for GSP and playing to get better are, paradoxically, opposites.

Playing for GSP, you quit each close match while searching for someone clearly worse than you, and hope they rematch so you can farm them.

Playing to get better you specifically rematch close matches or people better than you so you can improve, even though your GSP tanks.
 

Zachmac

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What I’ve noticed is playing for GSP and playing to get better are, paradoxically, opposites.

Playing for GSP, you quit each close match while searching for someone clearly worse than you, and hope they rematch so you can farm them.

Playing to get better you specifically rematch close matches or people better than you so you can improve, even though your GSP tanks.
The really annoying part is that if your GSP tanks hard enough in the latter scenerio, you'll have to really grind it back up before you're likely to encounter a really good player again. It's why I never give anyone more then a best of three, even if I'd really like to practice with them more.

I'd join arenas more like people keep reccomending, but having to wait in the queue drives me insane.
 

OnyanRings

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Honestly just make an arena if it bothers you that much, i almost never bother to go on quickplay anymore because of how much more control you have making an arena.

I always name mine "best out of 3/5" and people usually follow the rule and, as a bonus, you don't lose any GSP after a defeat.
 

StoicPhantom

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What I’ve noticed is playing for GSP and playing to get better are, paradoxically, opposites.
That's because people fundamentally misunderstand what matchmaking ranks are supposed to be about. They're supposed to be a rough measurement to match you to people who are roughly equivalent to your skill level, not measure how good you are overall. It's structured so that there aren't extreme differences in skill level.


So for example, my Zelda is roughly in the 8.40 mil. range. With rare exceptions, I'm matched with people within 50,000 GSP above and below me. So if we isolate that within a 100,000 GSP section, I would be in the middle of that. I'll lose more GSP if I lose to people in the lower part of that 100,000 and gain more GSP if I win in the higher part of that 100,000 or the inverted where I'll get less GSP if I win against the lower and lose less if I lose against the higher.

Is it the most accurate measurement? Probably not, I tend to go fairly even with those 50,000 above me, but get janked often enough by lag or other things to keep me at my current placement. But it is accurate enough to prevent me from three stocking some dude in the 6 mil. range. And that's really all this mode is meant to do.


The problem with most MM ranking systems is that they don't make the ranks vague enough and tend to label them in a way that gives the appearance of ranking people relative to the population on the whole, instead of relative to their peers in experience. It should be something like Beginner/Adept/Advanced/Master instead of 1/2/3/4 or Bronze/Silver/Gold/Platinum. The former gives off a difficulty ranking quality, much like when one selects a difficulty mode in single player games. The latter two gives off a status vibe and is why people start tying their worth as a competitor so heavily to something that isn't supposed to measure that.

Ultimate had the right idea by declining to implement a leaderboard for ranked mode and making a separate tournament mode for those seeking measurement against the general populace. They just flubbed the execution by making rankings too vague and giving visual representation to declining and rising GSP, and made goofy and uncompetitive rulesets for tournament mode. Had they expanded the Elite concept and made various modes like that while hiding the actual rank numbers and made a competitive section for tournament mode based on the currently agreed upon competitive rules, then online would be a lot better in that regard.


That's why it's ultimately pointless to try to game the system and why I sympathize with Oz's frustration. All it's going to do is put you against players far better than you and they will correct your rank to where it should be. It's like trying to skip directly to an advanced music course or something to that effect. You'll just be completely lost at what to do and ultimately leave in embarrassment.
 

Blutrausch

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I get it.

So rather than improve or even have good battles, people would rather settle for a bunch of silly points on a screen.
Those points are perceived as a reward, and the more points you earn, the more serotonin and dopamine is released. People will settle for feeling good over improvement. There is more to lose than there is to gain. A single loss could mean losing >2,000 GSP, while a win could merely be earning the player <500 GSP. There are factors for gaining or losing GSP. SSBU uses an Elo system, which is subject to focusing on one's rank, rather than one's skill. There's also ladder anxiety. People may fear losing, and when they lose, that dread of failure is exacerbated. It's unfortunate because SSB4 didn't seem to suffer from this symptom.
 
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Oz o:

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The system from Smash 4 seems to have improved in a couple of things, such as removing taunts, "tag messaging" and variety of stages and things like Miis. On the flip side, it seems people aren't nearly as encouraged to simply play as much as they want.
 

Gamer Cube

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I am sadly one of the people who leave after one match. This is primarily because I play a lot of my characters really weird. Out of the gate I can beat a lot of people, but once they have the download, I'm kind of screwed. The thing is that the opponent almost always gets the download after game 1, but I've yet to run into anyone who knows the little mac matchup, save 1 or 2 people. That's why 1 match is my choice. If I want to improve, I usually play a mode that isn't ranked, such as a tourney or arenas. The problem is that if you lose in quickplay, you get punished for it.
 

MilkCalf

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I would also like to point out that the GSP system likes pitting you in one and of the spectrum. No idea why but at like bellow 200 000 it doesn't give you much for winning but losing is also kinda low with 10x-5x more GSP loss than gain from winning. While much above that and it likes to put you there for losing a couple of times. It's also basically just thrash and trolls there so it really sucks.
 

StoicPhantom

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I would also like to point out that the GSP system likes pitting you in one and of the spectrum. No idea why but at like bellow 200 000 it doesn't give you much for winning but losing is also kinda low with 10x-5x more GSP loss than gain from winning. While much above that and it likes to put you there for losing a couple of times. It's also basically just thrash and trolls there so it really sucks.
You can see the details here and here, but in short, you are graded on a bell curve. You won't see much gain or loss on the top and bottom end, because there simply not enough players to match you equally, as indicated by the graphs in those links.

The actual GSP numbers are meaningless. What's important is your win rate. If you want to get into Elite for instance, I find I'm roughly around a 60% win rate (over 50 games) whenever I get a character into Elite. GSP is a proxy for your actual rank, not the process itself. It doesn't matter how much GSP you have relative to your opponent, it matters how consistently you win against that opponent.

So if it is expected that you beat someone one deviation lower than you 3 out of 4 times, then doing so will maintain your current rank. You will gain more GSP each of the three times you win, but then will take a huge hit on the fourth time when you lose. The bigger loss is perceived to be set you back more than you were, but it actually is just putting you right back where you were before (maintaining your current rank). This is to prevent your GSP from inflating indefinitely. Otherwise, your GSP would just keep rising, even though the rank it's supposed to represent will stay the same.

But if you happen to win 4/4 games, then you'll get a big boost regardless of how much the gap in GSP is between you. That's because you exceeded the algorithm's expectation of you and that's when you rank up or see a big boost in GSP. And if you lose more than one game, you will see a huge hit that puts you lower than you were before, because you did worse than expected and your rank has now fallen.

That's why GSP was a dumb metric. If you don't understand what's going on behind the scenes, it just seems random and arbitrary. And that's because it is mostly random and arbitrary. How much you gain and lose is separate from GSP disparity between the players and is more based on trying to keep sync with the "hidden" ranking process.


And that's also why it is silly to try to game the system by leaving after every match. Leaving after every match doesn't magically reset the 3/4 counter just because you are fighting someone new. And it doesn't change the bell curve either, so every new player you face is going to be roughly in the same skill range. Meaning your rank will still rise and fall relative to whether you actually "deserve" to be at this rank.

Unfamiliar MUs or playstyles you particularly struggle against or just plain old online jank can wreck your ranking, but so long as you actually are better than the average within that rank, you'll quickly make it back. I play doubles with Lucas a lot, because nobody plays doubles in Elite, but I get inundated with Free for Alls that tank my rank. When it gets too low I switch back to 1v1 and breeze back to where I was before. That's because my actual skill level is much greater than where I was, so it isn't too much trouble to rank up from there.


So just forget the numbers and focus on improving. If you must have numbers, look at your win rate in the online Records section. Try to keep it above 50% over 50 games. And by that, I mean actually build solid fundamentals and rematch whenever you lose to figure out why you lost (provided it wasn't an awful connection). The better you are, the easier it is to manipulate your rank. And at some point, your rank will cease to have any real meaning to you.
 

MilkCalf

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You can see the details here and here, but in short, you are graded on a bell curve. You won't see much gain or loss on the top and bottom end, because there simply not enough players to match you equally, as indicated by the graphs in those links.

The actual GSP numbers are meaningless. What's important is your win rate. If you want to get into Elite for instance, I find I'm roughly around a 60% win rate (over 50 games) whenever I get a character into Elite. GSP is a proxy for your actual rank, not the process itself. It doesn't matter how much GSP you have relative to your opponent, it matters how consistently you win against that opponent.

So if it is expected that you beat someone one deviation lower than you 3 out of 4 times, then doing so will maintain your current rank. You will gain more GSP each of the three times you win, but then will take a huge hit on the fourth time when you lose. The bigger loss is perceived to be set you back more than you were, but it actually is just putting you right back where you were before (maintaining your current rank). This is to prevent your GSP from inflating indefinitely. Otherwise, your GSP would just keep rising, even though the rank it's supposed to represent will stay the same.

But if you happen to win 4/4 games, then you'll get a big boost regardless of how much the gap in GSP is between you. That's because you exceeded the algorithm's expectation of you and that's when you rank up or see a big boost in GSP. And if you lose more than one game, you will see a huge hit that puts you lower than you were before, because you did worse than expected and your rank has now fallen.

That's why GSP was a dumb metric. If you don't understand what's going on behind the scenes, it just seems random and arbitrary. And that's because it is mostly random and arbitrary. How much you gain and lose is separate from GSP disparity between the players and is more based on trying to keep sync with the "hidden" ranking process.


And that's also why it is silly to try to game the system by leaving after every match. Leaving after every match doesn't magically reset the 3/4 counter just because you are fighting someone new. And it doesn't change the bell curve either, so every new player you face is going to be roughly in the same skill range. Meaning your rank will still rise and fall relative to whether you actually "deserve" to be at this rank.

Unfamiliar MUs or playstyles you particularly struggle against or just plain old online jank can wreck your ranking, but so long as you actually are better than the average within that rank, you'll quickly make it back. I play doubles with Lucas a lot, because nobody plays doubles in Elite, but I get inundated with Free for Alls that tank my rank. When it gets too low I switch back to 1v1 and breeze back to where I was before. That's because my actual skill level is much greater than where I was, so it isn't too much trouble to rank up from there.


So just forget the numbers and focus on improving. If you must have numbers, look at your win rate in the online Records section. Try to keep it above 50% over 50 games. And by that, I mean actually build solid fundamentals and rematch whenever you lose to figure out why you lost (provided it wasn't an awful connection). The better you are, the easier it is to manipulate your rank. And at some point, your rank will cease to have any real meaning to you.
Well the issue I have is that that low GSP hell is filled with people abusing the lag and spamming the same dumb options. I don't learn anything except I suppose how to use the buffer system to queue an option to come out faster than a doria on McDonald's wifi.
You need to fight people better than you to improve optimally and the moment I run into anyone who is a challenge, they send me right back to the K Rools, Ness and Links and the occasional one combo wonder Marios.
 

StoicPhantom

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Well the issue I have is that that low GSP hell is filled with people abusing the lag and spamming the same dumb options. I don't learn anything except I suppose how to use the buffer system to queue an option to come out faster than a doria on McDonald's wifi.
You need to fight people better than you to improve optimally and the moment I run into anyone who is a challenge, they send me right back to the K Rools, Ness and Links and the occasional one combo wonder Marios.
I can understand that, just clarifying what the ranking system actually entails.

Lag is annoying and the degenerates online don't make it any better. However, we kind of have to soldier on if we want to keep playing online. I can assure you that Elite Smash is just as bad if not worse than where you are at, so take the time to practice dealing with that on the lower levels.

One thing you can do is practice the combos and confirms of your main so that you know them by heart and just start trying to land them on your opponents, without worrying about actually winning the match. If you can do them on command, you won't have to worry about the lag distorting visual cues. And if you can get to where you can land them consistently, you will shoot past low GSP, because no one there really knows how to do the same. Think of them like level 3 cpus, but with more human oriented play. It's how I'm learning how to do Ryu's command inputs online, because you can't fake your way with him like Ken lol.
 

SneakyLink

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I generally try to stay for a "best 2 outta 3" scenario however I have 3 conditions that do make me leave after a single match:

1. Lag. The match has to be particularly bad lag wise for this to crop up.
2. One trick ponies. Generally I'm able to see through and beat them, and I do sometimes stay for a 2 out of 3 best of, but it doesn't make me feel accomplished.
3. Ruleset/Stage Selection. My preferred rule set is 3 stock 7 min Team Battles on Battlefield stages (I prefer team battles for the "teamwork") and I do accept that is a preference. Sometimes I get 1 on 1 and that's fine by me, but other times it's a 4 player free for all with items on in Stamina mode on Hyrule Castle, which is a bit too chaotic for online play.
4. All of the above, or 2 out of 3 of the above. Because why only have one pie piece when you can have 2 or 3!
 

Blackwolf666

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I Usually quit after 1 or 2 rounds to switch characters or switch modes. Every now and then I do feel like sticking to the same person but when I do others quit after 1 match anyway so I stopped bothering (even though I’m part of that problem lol)
 

Blutrausch

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You can see the details here and here, but in short, you are graded on a bell curve. You won't see much gain or loss on the top and bottom end, because there simply not enough players to match you equally, as indicated by the graphs in those links.

The actual GSP numbers are meaningless. What's important is your win rate. If you want to get into Elite for instance, I find I'm roughly around a 60% win rate (over 50 games) whenever I get a character into Elite. GSP is a proxy for your actual rank, not the process itself. It doesn't matter how much GSP you have relative to your opponent, it matters how consistently you win against that opponent.

So if it is expected that you beat someone one deviation lower than you 3 out of 4 times, then doing so will maintain your current rank. You will gain more GSP each of the three times you win, but then will take a huge hit on the fourth time when you lose. The bigger loss is perceived to be set you back more than you were, but it actually is just putting you right back where you were before (maintaining your current rank). This is to prevent your GSP from inflating indefinitely. Otherwise, your GSP would just keep rising, even though the rank it's supposed to represent will stay the same.

But if you happen to win 4/4 games, then you'll get a big boost regardless of how much the gap in GSP is between you. That's because you exceeded the algorithm's expectation of you and that's when you rank up or see a big boost in GSP. And if you lose more than one game, you will see a huge hit that puts you lower than you were before, because you did worse than expected and your rank has now fallen.

That's why GSP was a dumb metric. If you don't understand what's going on behind the scenes, it just seems random and arbitrary. And that's because it is mostly random and arbitrary. How much you gain and lose is separate from GSP disparity between the players and is more based on trying to keep sync with the "hidden" ranking process.


And that's also why it is silly to try to game the system by leaving after every match. Leaving after every match doesn't magically reset the 3/4 counter just because you are fighting someone new. And it doesn't change the bell curve either, so every new player you face is going to be roughly in the same skill range. Meaning your rank will still rise and fall relative to whether you actually "deserve" to be at this rank.

Unfamiliar MUs or playstyles you particularly struggle against or just plain old online jank can wreck your ranking, but so long as you actually are better than the average within that rank, you'll quickly make it back. I play doubles with Lucas a lot, because nobody plays doubles in Elite, but I get inundated with Free for Alls that tank my rank. When it gets too low I switch back to 1v1 and breeze back to where I was before. That's because my actual skill level is much greater than where I was, so it isn't too much trouble to rank up from there.


So just forget the numbers and focus on improving. If you must have numbers, look at your win rate in the online Records section. Try to keep it above 50% over 50 games. And by that, I mean actually build solid fundamentals and rematch whenever you lose to figure out why you lost (provided it wasn't an awful connection). The better you are, the easier it is to manipulate your rank. And at some point, your rank will cease to have any real meaning to you.
Predatoria Predatoria 's explanation to me regarding GSP had given me an appreciation for it. I began thinking that, yes, if I was as good as I thought, then I'd be able to earn my points again. It helped me focus less on GSP. I figured the links you posted were the ones I've posted in before.

Also, one-and-done may be frowned upon, but it's not inherently bad. I know that YB, a Samus main does this and he held his own at Prime Saga, defeating several top players. Play how you want. If Bo3 or Bo5 is your thing, go with it.
 
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StoicPhantom

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Also, one-and-done may be frowned upon, but it's not inherently bad. I know that YB, a Samus main does this and he held his own at Prime Saga, defeating several top players. Play how you want. If Bo3 or Bo5 is your thing, go with it.
YB is at a skill level where he is used to adaption. I'm more talking about people who leave in fear of their opponent adapting to their play or because they got beat. It won't matter to someone like YB, but it is important for lower levels to get used to and counter. And rematching someone that beat you is helpful to learn unfamiliar MUs or how to adapt to their playstyle.

It's up to the individual at the end of the day, I'm just pointing out that doing so in an attempt to "cheat" their real rank is pointless, due to how the ranking system actually works. If a person wants to continue attempting to do this, just likes to play as many different people as possible, or doesn't have time to waste on lowly scrubs, then sure.

I rarely ever get a rematch, so I'm used to this anyways. I'm just concerned over people confusing shallow symbols for meaningful fulfillment. My Zelda's real GSP is over 6.9 million and I'm at the point where the system fails to find many people at or above my level. As such, I tend to play a lot of people not at my skill level (part of why no one rematches me lol).

And the feeling of liberation that comes with the comfortableness and confidence at that level of play really makes the numbers seem like they are just going up and down in the background. It's like a reward for grinding all these months and I'm free to "autopilot" the match and focus on doing stupid stuff. I kind of have to wonder if this is what top players feel like when they play online. Not that playing intense matches isn't fun, but sometimes it feels good to not be under that pressure of equal or greater skill levels and just enjoy playing good players.
 

Khao

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what excuse do you really have?
The real question is why in the world would you even need an excuse? People are going to want to leave for any reason and none of them are any of your business. You might want to stop playing. You might want to switch characters. Real life might get in the way. You might just not want a rematch because you don't like to play that way. You might have gotten mad at the game, in wich case quitting is absolutely the healthiest choice. You might honestly just not care about getting better and that's perfectly okay.

No reason for leaving is invalid. This is a game. Not a cult. People don't have to live by a strict code of honour and morality outside of the basic rules set by the game. Everyone plays for a different reason, and unless you're being toxic about it (which you can't exactly be in a game without any form of real communication) or straight up cheating somehow, you simply have to respect that.

Rejecting a rematch?

It's literally always your right.
 
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Blutrausch

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YB is at a skill level where he is used to adaption. I'm more talking about people who leave in fear of their opponent adapting to their play or because they got beat. It won't matter to someone like YB, but it is important for lower levels to get used to and counter. And rematching someone that beat you is helpful to learn unfamiliar MUs or how to adapt to their playstyle.

It's up to the individual at the end of the day, I'm just pointing out that doing so in an attempt to "cheat" their real rank is pointless, due to how the ranking system actually works. If a person wants to continue attempting to do this, just likes to play as many different people as possible, or doesn't have time to waste on lowly scrubs, then sure.

I rarely ever get a rematch, so I'm used to this anyways. I'm just concerned over people confusing shallow symbols for meaningful fulfillment. My Zelda's real GSP is over 6.9 million and I'm at the point where the system fails to find many people at or above my level. As such, I tend to play a lot of people not at my skill level (part of why no one rematches me lol).

And the feeling of liberation that comes with the comfortableness and confidence at that level of play really makes the numbers seem like they are just going up and down in the background. It's like a reward for grinding all these months and I'm free to "autopilot" the match and focus on doing stupid stuff. I kind of have to wonder if this is what top players feel like when they play online. Not that playing intense matches isn't fun, but sometimes it feels good to not be under that pressure of equal or greater skill levels and just enjoy playing good players.
I only mentioned YB as an example of someone who is really good at the game, but goes against what most frown upon. The point was to let others know that it's fine to do one-and-done, even if it's frowned upon. The irony is that being expected to rematch goes against what children and adolescents are taught about handling peer pressure. If you want to improve, sure, stick around. That isn't to say that leaving after you win or lose won't help. You're still gaining something from a single match.
 

StoicPhantom

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I only mentioned YB as an example of someone who is really good at the game, but goes against what most frown upon. The point was to let others know that it's fine to do one-and-done, even if it's frowned upon. The irony is that being expected to rematch goes against what children and adolescents are taught about handling peer pressure. If you want to improve, sure, stick around. That isn't to say that leaving after you win or lose won't help. You're still gaining something from a single match.
Right and I was just clarifying that for people that want to improve, YB has enough experience that he wouldn't need to worry about rematching to gain adaptation skills. You can learn from a single match, but if you are interested in going to tournaments or playing the same person multiple times, getting used to adapting is important. If you don't care about that, then power to you.
 

Xelrog

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Why would I stay? I like variation. I want to fight as many different people as possible. After I have a match with someone I want a new opponent.
 

Noncommunistuser

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While there is a few reasons like being scummy about virtual data values (GSP), irl obligations, and more I don't understand why some people just... leave.
 

TimeSpace

Smash Ace
Joined
Aug 14, 2018
Messages
781
I don't leave if I lose but I do leave whenever I win. I don't care at all about GSP but when I lose, I really want to get a chance to stick it to them, and so for as long as they stick around, I will until I can bag just one win on them, and then promptly leave - my GSP tanked but that's not really a big deal to me - getting that petty win to make sure they can't go off with a victory means a heck of a lot more! For me - it's petty spite and nothing more; and I couldn't be happier with that.
 
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link2702

Smash Champion
Joined
May 10, 2008
Messages
2,722
Location
Oklahoma
People also don’t want to be kicked out of elite smash if they lose too much. Or if they just barely got in. You lose so much gsp when you lose vs how much you gain when you win.

And when you get booted from elite smash, you often run into far more toxic rulesets and/or players.

So when you get paired against an opponent in elite who straight up wrecks you, you aren’t gonna stay since you risk losing so much gsp you get kicked from elite

This is one of the reasons why gsp and ultimates online is so terrible. When we had for fun and for glory, you at least knew EXACTLY what to expect and what you would get paired against. It might not have been ideal since it was FD only, but that was still better than the current setup.
 

meleebrawler

Smash Hero
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meleebrawler
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People also don’t want to be kicked out of elite smash if they lose too much. Or if they just barely got in. You lose so much gsp when you lose vs how much you gain when you win.

And when you get booted from elite smash, you often run into far more toxic rulesets and/or players.

So when you get paired against an opponent in elite who straight up wrecks you, you aren’t gonna stay since you risk losing so much gsp you get kicked from elite

This is one of the reasons why gsp and ultimates online is so terrible. When we had for fun and for glory, you at least knew EXACTLY what to expect and what you would get paired against. It might not have been ideal since it was FD only, but that was still better than the current setup.
Not really. Skill matchmaking was nonexistent in Smash 4 and no matter how long you played or how well you did overall, you are just as likely to be matched against total pros who stomp you as you are with noobs who only know how to attack with specials, or rely exclusively on Ganon/Kirbycides/Mac dash attacks to win. Even in the For Fun setting, you never know when you'll run into the dreaded taunt party.

Regardless of how accurate GSP is (I consider pretty much any ranking system like this to be a rough approximate at best), when I play modes outside of Quickplay like the event tournies and see B-button fighters in the opening rounds that I virtually never encounter in the former, something must be going right when I get consistently engaging matches there. Yes, even in the now extremely rare circumstance I get a different mode like 2v2 or stages outside Omega and Battlefield. I don't really see how you can be toxic with rulesets when regular stages are completely random and even items can be just as likely to hurt you as much as they help. Brawl's stage voting and susceptibility to hacking was toxic.
 

Xelrog

Smash Lord
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Messages
1,136
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Battle Ground, WA
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GSP freaking sucks and I hate It when it goes down so if I get absolutely destroyed I’m leaving first match.
Just FYI, it works the same way as almost every other online game. People only get mad about GSP because they can see the number.
 
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Goomboi

Smash Cadet
Joined
Mar 14, 2020
Messages
25
I leave win or lose, this is because I'm trying to play against as many peeps as possible.
 

DougEfresh

Smash Apprentice
Joined
Mar 23, 2020
Messages
153
I generally try to be a bo3 or bo5 kinda guy on Elite, especially when I encounter someone who gave me legitimately solid fights since that's pretty uncommon in my experience even in the upper areas of Elite Smash. If I don't rematch after game 1 though, it's typically due to lag and/or certain characters I just don't enjoy fighting (typically due to being frequent culprits of horribly laggy matches, but could also be particular playstyles), but I also do a one-and-done method if I'm warming up as I go on QP and my first one or two matches were especially intense. I'd normally really like to continue in this scenario, but it's at times difficult for me to play at my best when my heart is still pumping hard from a very close, last hit situation game and jump back in for an immediate rematch (playing lucario well really requires a strong and healthy mentality for me, esp. on QP). Within 2-3 matches, I'm starting to feel decent and by the 5th I'm often thoroughly ready to go back to doing bo3's and bo5's as is my usual tendency.
 

Champion of Hyrule

Smash Apprentice
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Messages
175
Location
Saskatoon
You mean when after a match it gives you the option to have a rematch or leave? Yeah, I never realized most people stay so I always have a tendency to leave after one match. Other people might be like that.
 

Kewkky

Uhh... Look at my status.
Premium
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Apr 20, 2008
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On the rare times I play online, I jump ship after one single match because I want to play against different playstyles, not against the same person over and over again. Although to be fair, if I lose I do feel more inclined to stick around and "prove myself", lol.
 

GhostM

Phantom
Premium
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May 3, 2019
Messages
422
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Would also like to add the fact that some people take the GSP too seriously, and get discouraged from playing if they can visually see the numbers go down while their opponents go higher. Some people tend to let this number get the best of them to the point where they are driven to play solely for the numbers, and tend to get very upset if they are outplayed or straight up lose the match.
 
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