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What Are Your Unpopular Gaming Opinions? (Ver. 2)

Quillion

Smash Hero
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
5,479
but you didn't get the variety of previous 3D Sonic games. It felt very repetitive.
You know, I'm starting to think that without those "slow moments" in Sonic games in general, whether that be individual levels like Marble Zone or entire alternate gameplay styles like Treasure Hunting and the Werehog, the core speed-focused Sonic gameplay is just inherently repetitive.

It's just much harder to quest around or explore when you move so fast that things blur by you, so there's really not much reason to have those "quest" elements in a Sonic game that give most other games their variety. And when the Sonic devs try to incorporate those things into Sonic by giving them their own dedicated space, people complain.

You can't really win here. It's either consistent repetition or unfocused variety.
 

DragonRobotKing26

Smash Champion
Joined
Sep 26, 2021
Messages
2,130
Location
Earth-201769
I don't really like the modern mainline Resident Evil games (RE7 and RE8,not the remakes),these games looks like a generic modern horror games,Ethan who is the protagonist of the game is a typical generic and common video game protagonist who is silent on RE7 and doesn't have the face revealed,RE7 i consider the worst but not too much as RE5 and RE6,the family baker is more for a evil family who can works on a horror movie than Resident Evil,also i consider Lady Dimitrescu a little bit generic

And my fear is how could be resident Evil 9,it will be the same the two last ones
 

Champion of Hyrule

Smash Master
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Messages
4,170
Location
*doxxes myself*
Dragon Ball FighterZ actually has a lot of potential for a sequel. The biggest potential issue would be the roster but the way it handles characters and their transformations is actually pretty easy to subvert. As an example you could make Goku’s base form his default and switch which other forms are separate rodter slots and just generally switch up movesets. They could even add characters who wouldn’t really make sense for DBFZ1 like Super Buu or an individual Ginyu force member. Plus more of a focus on OG dragon ball would be very cool, gimme Tao Pai Pai already.

The game has a lot of mechanical depth too and switching up more aspects of gameplay could actually make a huge difference. Hope the stages are better too. ArcSys should definitely make a fighting game for a different anime like One Piece first though.
 

fogbadge

Smash Obsessed
Joined
Jun 29, 2012
Messages
20,730
Location
Scotland
Another Code has some of the best written characters in all of gaming. especially after the remakes cleaned up the dialogue
 
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Oracle Link

Smash Master
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
3,356
Location
Germany
Plus more of a focus on OG dragon ball would be very cool, gimme Tao Pai Pai already.
👆This Im sadly not the biggest fan of kakarot and dont have great online so the classic stuff in those games isnt for me personally!
anyways here is the base roster for my DBFZ 2
1707396581055.png

A lot of the more popular characters would have been dlc! Instead with this i focused more on the basics!
 

fogbadge

Smash Obsessed
Joined
Jun 29, 2012
Messages
20,730
Location
Scotland
I unironically think working with fans who are genuinely passionate about their franchises is the best thing SEGA has done with Sonic and more video game companies should follow that example, especially Nintendo.
have you met passionate Nintendo fans?
 

Oracle Link

Smash Master
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
3,356
Location
Germany
I unironically think working with fans who are genuinely passionate about their franchises is the best thing SEGA has done with Sonic and more video game companies should follow that example, especially Nintendo.
have you met passionate Nintendo fans?
I for example am a passionate nintendo fan and granted i get why people feel betrayed by some of their decisions but as someone who actually made a franchise i can atleast understand the want to shgut down bigger unauthorized Projects!
Also saying Nintedno= Bad ignores that a majority of nintendos staff just wants to make great games and usually trhose games are great!

I mean i heard people throw out hate at nintendo because they took down a fan remake of a game that they wanted to remake themselves (Metroid 2)
They were 100% in the right as soon as they released samus returns!
Now they could be somewhat nicer to be sure and especially offer more alternatives but most of their moves make atleast some sense!
 

Champion of Hyrule

Smash Master
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Messages
4,170
Location
*doxxes myself*
The feature in the final fantasy remasters that lets you do stuff like fully restore health or deal a certain amount of damage is a bit clunky but it’s a great feature.

The fact that you can basically permanently screw over a save file by missing out on a detail of character progression or being slightly under leveled in a turn based RPG is legitimately one of the most hostile thing I’ve ever seen to new players, and a serious problem with the genre. An RPG should at least people some kind of way out of being screwed over like this.

I think a good idea would be to have a training mode which you can access at any time to prevent someone from being under leveled at a boss.
 

Oracle Link

Smash Master
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
3,356
Location
Germany
The feature in the final fantasy remasters that lets you do stuff like fully restore health or deal a certain amount of damage is a bit clunky but it’s a great feature.

The fact that you can basically permanently screw over a save file by missing out on a detail of character progression or being slightly under leveled in a turn based RPG is legitimately one of the most hostile thing I’ve ever seen to new players, and a serious problem with the genre. An RPG should at least people some kind of way out of being screwed over like this.

I think a good idea would be to have a training mode which you can access at any time to prevent someone from being under leveled at a boss.
Yeah i didnt finish dragonquest 7 because of how afwul it was designed!
 

LiveStudioAudience

Smash Master
Joined
Dec 1, 2019
Messages
3,887
You know, I'm starting to think that without those "slow moments" in Sonic games in general, whether that be individual levels like Marble Zone or entire alternate gameplay styles like Treasure Hunting and the Werehog, the core speed-focused Sonic gameplay is just inherently repetitive.

It's just much harder to quest around or explore when you move so fast that things blur by you, so there's really not much reason to have those "quest" elements in a Sonic game that give most other games their variety. And when the Sonic devs try to incorporate those things into Sonic by giving them their own dedicated space, people complain.

You can't really win here. It's either consistent repetition or unfocused variety.
What gets lost in the discussion about alternative playstyles are a perfectly fine concept... in moderation. When executed with restraint they can add real novelty to a game and shake up eventual monotony of a playthrough. Look at the Super Mario Galaxy titles; they have stars/levels based around motion control experiments and while not all of them stick the landing, they rarely last long enough to effectively hurt the overall experience. They're a bit of spice in the SMG duology that works within the context of that pair of games.

However, the more you have alternative experiences dominate the playthrough and the more the former drifts from the mainline game, the greater the risk in the concept not being executed as well while also potentially alienating fans that bought the release for the style/genre they actually want. Its why Sonic Adventure 2 will never appeal to all Sonic fans because even if you view the mech shooting and treasure hunts as having inherently good design, they're not going to be enduring to people that simply prefer speed-oriented platform stages.

It's worth noting that Big's fishing aside, the other styles in SA1 went for either a platformer or speed emphasis, with Gamma being much quicker than Eggman or Tails would be in the sequel, Amy having to be on the move to escape the badnik chasing her, and the radar system allowing Knuckles' sections to not play nearly as long. Even with their flaws it could be argued that much of Adventure keeps to the spirit of Sonic with its core philosophy even if the gameplay does differ in some respects.

Moreover, from a practical standpoint if the ratio of experimental playstyle continues being a pattern, then a game series can quickly gain the reputation of a having a gameplay roulette. That's a distinction than can be potentially poisonous because unless such an idea is baked into the game's identity (Mario Party with its numerous mini-games) then a market could very be reticent about trying the games because they're not entirely certain of what they're getting.The reason Colors got as much good press as it did was because it kept things straightforward and gave players a 2D/3D platformer with novelty coming from Wisp powers. It's an experiment that still stays within typical Sonic and is a much more consistent release because of it.

tl:dr Alternate playstyles can add a lot to games, but like so many other elements in Sonic it's an idea that needs to be tempered by common sense application and selectively utilized in the right circumstances.
 

Quillion

Smash Hero
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
5,479
What gets lost in the discussion about alternative playstyles are a perfectly fine concept... in moderation. When executed with restraint they can add real novelty to a game and shake up eventual monotony of a playthrough. Look at the Super Mario Galaxy titles; they have stars/levels based around motion control experiments and while not all of them stick the landing, they rarely last long enough to effectively hurt the overall experience. They're a bit of spice in the SMG duology that works within the context of that pair of games.

However, the more you have alternative experiences dominate the playthrough and the more the former drifts from the mainline game, the greater the risk in the concept not being executed as well while also potentially alienating fans that bought the release for the style/genre they actually want. Its why Sonic Adventure 2 will never appeal to all Sonic fans because even if you view the mech shooting and treasure hunts as having inherently good design, they're not going to be enduring to people that simply prefer speed-oriented platform stages.

It's worth noting that Big's fishing aside, the other styles in SA1 went for either a platformer or speed emphasis, with Gamma being much quicker than Eggman or Tails would be in the sequel, Amy having to be on the move to escape the badnik chasing her, and the radar system allowing Knuckles' sections to not play nearly as long. Even with their flaws it could be argued that much of Adventure keeps to the spirit of Sonic with its core philosophy even if the gameplay does differ in some respects.

Moreover, from a practical standpoint if the ratio of experimental playstyle continues being a pattern, then a game series can quickly gain the reputation of a having a gameplay roulette. That's a distinction than can be potentially poisonous because unless such an idea is baked into the game's identity (Mario Party with its numerous mini-games) then a market could very be reticent about trying the games because they're not entirely certain of what they're getting.The reason Colors got as much good press as it did was because it kept things straightforward and gave players a 2D/3D platformer with novelty coming from Wisp powers. It's an experiment that still stays within typical Sonic and is a much more consistent release because of it.

tl:dr Alternate playstyles can add a lot to games, but like so many other elements in Sonic it's an idea that needs to be tempered by common sense application and selectively utilized in the right circumstances.
Yeah, a little gameplay mix-ups here and there are good in any game, I can see that.

Still though, would any Sonic game be anything more than repetitive without either those or the "slow moments" like Marble Zone? My point is that Sonic's speed focus design is just inherently repetitive unless they actively go against it.
 

LiveStudioAudience

Smash Master
Joined
Dec 1, 2019
Messages
3,887
Yeah, a little gameplay mix-ups here and there are good in any game, I can see that.

Still though, would any Sonic game be anything more than repetitive without either those or the "slow moments" like Marble Zone? My point is that Sonic's speed focus design is just inherently repetitive unless they actively go against it.
Less speedy sections can be better utilized if it's an issue of experience and skill being able to effectively to work around it. Marble Zone's real failure isn't that its slow, it's that such sections are effectively mandatory. It reeks of the kind of platforming that Yuji Naki ironically cited as his issue with Mario; completing the level effectively takes the same amount of time no matter how skilled you are. Compare that to something like Aquatic Ruin Zone from Sonic 2, which also has slow underwater bits... that can be effectively ignored in favor of the higher speedier paths if you're good enough to get to them.

That central philosophy is a solid one to generally build upon for 3D Sonic; beginners/casuals will have speedy spectacle sections but generally slower platforming while the more experienced players will be able to go through them much quicker. You then build upon further replay value with two gameplay elements:

-Other quick playable characters with their own quirks (and level changes to really give motivation to replay stage remixes) that still play similar enough to Sonic (Shadow, Blaze, Metal Sonic etc)

-Incentivize further exploration through things like Red Rings, alternate exits, and (for the hardcores) a fair ranking system with its own potential rewards.

With that kind of framework, it's where you can have further select variations in gameplay style to effectively mix up the overall experience. Build upon the best friend missions from Generations so you can tie in Tails, Knuckles. Amy, Cream etc. for ideal gameplay sections in the same way the game (presumably) has for the story itself.
 

Quillion

Smash Hero
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
5,479
Less speedy sections can be better utilized if it's an issue of experience and skill being able to effectively to work around it. Marble Zone's real failure isn't that its slow, it's that such sections are effectively mandatory. It reeks of the kind of platforming that Yuji Naki ironically cited as his issue with Mario; completing the level effectively takes the same amount of time no matter how skilled you are. Compare that to something like Aquatic Ruin Zone from Sonic 2, which also has slow underwater bits... that can be effectively ignored in favor of the higher speedier paths if you're good enough to get to them.

That central philosophy is a solid one to generally build upon for 3D Sonic; beginners/casuals will have speedy spectacle sections but generally slower platforming while the more experienced players will be able to go through them much quicker. You then build upon further replay value with two gameplay elements:

-Other quick playable characters with their own quirks (and level changes to really give motivation to replay stage remixes) that still play similar enough to Sonic (Shadow, Blaze, Metal Sonic etc)

-Incentivize further exploration through things like Red Rings, alternate exits, and (for the hardcores) a fair ranking system with its own potential rewards.

With that kind of framework, it's where you can have further select variations in gameplay style to effectively mix up the overall experience. Build upon the best friend missions from Generations so you can tie in Tails, Knuckles. Amy, Cream etc. for ideal gameplay sections in the same way the game (presumably) has for the story itself.
You do realize that in that sense, skill just makes the game MORE repetitive than less. I'm even saying this as someone who outright likes repetitive games and wishes repetition was seen as a tool used well or badly rather than a bad thing.

Side note, Naka clearly isn't a Mario speedrunner.
 

LiveStudioAudience

Smash Master
Joined
Dec 1, 2019
Messages
3,887
You do realize that in that sense, skill just makes the game MORE repetitive than less. I'm even saying this as someone who outright likes repetitive games and wishes repetition was seen as a tool used well or badly rather than a bad thing.

Side note, Naka clearly isn't a Mario speedrunner.
In fairness to Naka, the speedrunning phenomenon wasn't really huge circa the late 80s when Sonic was initially being thought about, so lack of knowledge about exploits and skip tricks at that point is understandable.

With the former point, I think dedicated Sonic fans (the ones most likely to develop the kind of skill mastery we're talking about here) are the ones that often least object to certain repetitive elements either because they're focused on getting better or simply enjoy replaying the levels that much.

The ideal balance in this hypothetical is that if you just casually like Sonic or are into platformers generally, you could get a decently wide range of content in a few standard playthroughs via the multiple speedy characters, variable (but not excessive) friend missions, and some collection of stuff like Red Rings; all without necessarily changing up the gameplay too much. However, for a hardcore fan, any eventual repetition you do inevitably experience will be one you're not inclined to be bothered by because you'd be the type of fan that loves going for A ranks, grabbing all collectables, and getting stuff like secret exits/time bonuses. Essentially a game deep/long enough to for casuals to enjoy a few times but with the type of repetition utilization that hardcore fans would gladly dive into.
 

Champion of Hyrule

Smash Master
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Messages
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*doxxes myself*
Difficulty in and of itself is not an effective way to keep players on the right path in games, unless it’s an RPG where the enemy levels are shown to be higher. A lot of players will just brute force their way through areas that they’re not technically supposed to be and they can be punished for it. There’s definitely plenty of new players who have went to a higher level area in a game like dark souls or elden ring and thought all the unintended difficulty was natural because they heard the game was hard
 

Quillion

Smash Hero
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
5,479
Difficulty in and of itself is not an effective way to keep players on the right path in games, unless it’s an RPG where the enemy levels are shown to be higher. A lot of players will just brute force their way through areas that they’re not technically supposed to be and they can be punished for it. There’s definitely plenty of new players who have went to a higher level area in a game like dark souls or elden ring and thought all the unintended difficulty was natural because they heard the game was hard
In and of itself, I agree, but it's still better than literal hallways.
----
Now that I keep hearing more about the indie video game sector, the more it feels like it's grown to be not so different from the AAA sector.

People romanticize it as a fountain of new ideas... but that was more true in the indie sector's early days. And even then that's not so different from how the video game industry as a whole was a fountain of new ideas before it became increasingly corporatized.

Indie visual styles being more unique than generic "realistic" AAA games? Lately, they've been standardizing to 16-bit styles that are generic in their own right, not to mention use of stock assets in polygonal games.

Indie games come up with new gameplay styles and genres as opposed to oversaturated shooters and open world AAA games? The indie space is now oversaturated with these "horror based on childhood experience" games and Metroidvanias.

Honestly, all this praise for the indie space feels better directed towards its early days which are no longer around.
 

LiveStudioAudience

Smash Master
Joined
Dec 1, 2019
Messages
3,887
I think a really effective use of VR would be for recreating arcade experiences. While it would never be quite the same as the real life was, being able to look around while playing a Street Fighter II or Pac-Man and then seeing one's preferred style old school arcade would really add to the whole thing.
 
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Perkilator

Smash Legend
Joined
Apr 8, 2018
Messages
10,359
Location
The perpetual trash fire known as Planet Earth(tm)
I think a really effective use of VR would be for recreating arcade experiences. While it would never be quite the same as living it then, being able to look around while playing a Street Fighter II or Pac-Man and then seeing one's preferred style old school arcade would really add to the whole playthrough.
VR would lend itself pretty well to light gun games like House of the Dead and Time Crisis.
 
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