Make Your Move 16: MYM 17 Starting June 1st

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Wraps things up!

The Bug-type Pokémon #617, Accelgor, is the evolved form of Shelmet. Once a meak and wholly defensive mollusk-like creature, Shelmet loses its heavy shell upon evolution, spurred by being traded for a Karrablast. While Karrablast steals poor Shelmet's carapace to become the armored and knightly Escavalier, Shelmet benefits from this theft by trading its sedentary lifestyle for blazing, ninja-like speed as Accelgor. Few Pokémon manage to reach the mach speeds that this ironically swift snail attains, and it uses this to its advantage to overwhelm its opponents with overwhelmingly quick ninja-like movements. Since it has lost its shell, it wraps itself in numerous layers of a thin membrane to keep itself hydrated. Accelgor brings its gastropodular ninjutsu to the Smash Bros. arena, because nothing says 'hype' in MYM like yet another ninja moveset.

While Accelgor can have one of three different abilities, in its Smash Bros. appearance, the Sticky Hold ability is most directly featured. Thanks to Sticky Hold, Accelgor cannot be forced to drop an item. Unlike other characters, who are prone to drop held items from time to time while taking knockback, Accelgor will never lose hold of any item in its grip. As to be expected, it moves with quick, dynamic, ninja-like motions. Due to its lack of legs, it forcefully launches itself from a standing position to “fly” across the ground for its dash animation. Unlike fellow ninja Pokémon Greninja, Accelgor doesn't vanish while dodging, but it has a very fluid and swift dodge roll nonetheless. Like other ninja-like fighters, it is capable of performing the wall jump and wall cling techniques.


Size – 4
Weight – 2
Ground Speed – 9
Traction – 10
Air Speed - 9
Fall Speed - 8
Jump – 8


At 2'7'' in canon, Accelgor is rather diminutive for a fully-evolved Pokémon. Nonetheless, it is slightly scaled up for Smash, as with most Pokémon combatants, and is close to Villager in model size. It has most of the benefits bestowed upon characters of its type: small frame, great speed, excellent traction, and a decent fall speed. While not quite as quick to reach back down as Greninja, it sits comfortably near Mega Man in regard to gravity. Combined with an excellent jump height (a full first and second jump easily getting it to the highest platforms in Skyloft) and equally quick ground and air speeds, Accelgor can move to and fro with ease, able to be exactly wherever it needs to be as the player wills. In fact, stacked up against the canon roster, Accelgor is the second fastest character, ahead of Captain Falcon but slightly behind Sonic.

Accelgor's major disadvantage is its characteristic light weight, sharing a tier with Mr. Game & Watch and ultimately being very poor at surviving powerful blows. Coupled with this problem is Accelgor's smaller than average shield, making it a hassle at times to survive into the higher percentages.


Neutral Special – Spikes


Spikes is a move that Accelgor can learn through breeding, and due to the great utility of the move, this Pokémon is quite often seen using it. In the Pokémon series, Spikes functions as a move that lays – you guessed it – barbed spikes (which resemble caltrops) on the ground, providing a trap that injures opponents that fall onto them. The move works much the same way in Smash Bros. With a press of the button, Accelgor pulls a single jack-like spike, about the size of a Freezie, out from hammerspace, and tosses it forward with both arms straight. The animation for this action is about as long as Pac-Man's fruit throw, and like Pac-Man's fruit, the spike functions as an item, and it lands about 1/3 of Battlefield's length away from Accelgor. The move can be charged exactly in the same way as Sheik's needles, allowing Accelgor to toss more spikes at once, up to 5 total. When tossing multiple spikes, Accelgor will throw them in a cluster, so they will all fly in roughly the same direction, but land at different locations in front of Accelgor, though their max range is still 1/3 of Battlefield's length. Spikes deal 8% damage when tossed at an opponent, and 4% damage every time they are touched once resting upon the ground. In any case, contact with a spike is quite painful for Accelgor's opponents, and notably, they suffer higher than average flinch frames.

Accelgor can also be hurt by its own spikes, so you'll want to be careful when attempting to pick them up. As they are items, individual spikes can be picked up and thrown again, and this is a tactic Accelgor can make excellent use of due to their high hitstun. Enemies may also grab spikes, but are easily prone to dropping them when attacked, risking further injuring contact with the dangerous traps. Luckily for Accelgor, Sticky Hold ensures that it will never drop one of its spikes, keeping it safe and secure to pick them up and carry them without risk of suffering unnecessary damage. There can be up to 5 spikes per Accelgor on the map, and unlike other items, retossing a spike doesn't dispose of it, but simply relocates it. Spikes will disappear after 20 seconds.

  • (Alt. Neutral Special 1 – Snagging Spikes)
Working much the same way as the default special, Accelgor tosses a different kind of spike that pierces into opponents it contacts, dealing 1% damage each every second until they fall off after 7 seconds. With mutiple spikes, this can rack up a lot of damage in a short amount of time. Tossed spikes can be shielded, but their damage cannot be shielded against once attached. Unlike normal spikes, snagging spikes are strictly projectiles and cannot be picked up as items, preventing Accelgor from using them manually. These spikes disappear after 15 seconds.

  • (Alt. Neutral Special 2 – Toxic Spikes)
Accelgor throws out up to 5 spikes as normal. This time, they are colored purple instead of a generic metallic gray. Rather than flinching opponents and dealing direct damage, toxic spikes, when contacted, ooze a horrid toxin that poisons the opponent, giving them a purple “poisoned” aura and dealing 1-2% per second for 5 seconds. This stacks if an additional spike is contacted while poisoned, doubling the damage output. The damage does not increased if a third spike makes contact. Toxic spikes can be picked up, but will deal 1% damage for every second they are held. Toxic spikes disappear after 10 seconds.

Side Special – Membrane Chain
Expertly uncoiling some of its protective membrane from its arm, Accelgor performs a very quick-to-start attack in which it flicks its arms and casts out a long strand of membrane. The rope-like material travels straight for half of Battlefield's length, lingering at its maximum length for a few frames before immediately snapping back to Accelgor. The sticky membrane attaches itself to any opponent or item it contacts, functioning as a command grab, and as soon as it does so, Accelgor is left vulnerable to other opponents until it makes another input. Yes, Accelgor uses its membrane as a chain dart. “Get over here!”, indeed.

In a less gory take on Scorpion's infamous spear technique, if the control stick is flicked inward, Accelgor will give a forceful tug and pull its target toward itself, briefly flinching opponents but dealing no damage. This leaves both combatants in immediate proximity of one another, with Accelgor at a slight frame advantage. If the control stick is flicked outward, Accelgor reels itself in, rocketing itself into the target and sending it flying. Against opponents, this causes a heavy impact that deals 13% damage and moderate knockback killing outwards at 160%. For extra damage, activating this move while holding a spike will cause it to attach to the end of the whip, impaling enemies when it makes contact and dealing 9% damage, though this removes the attack's command grab properties. Quick to start and quick to end, this attack can be disorienting for opponents and can set Accelgor up for any number of combo options, or at least net the Bug-type an item from afar. A useful technique for closing distances or punishing rolls, the Membrane Chain is a move best used smartly, as despite activating quickly, failing to connect with this move leaves Accelgor quite vulnerable.

  • (Alt. Side Special 1 – Whip Wrap)
Accelgor casts out a thread of its membrane as normal. This time, however, its grabbox is replaced with a hitbox, and it whips the opponent. The entire length of the thread is a hitbox, but only the tip does significant damage and knockback, causing 14% with decent kill power. The rest of the thread is a sourspot that deals 4% damage and hardly launches the opponent. This attack is twice as fast to complete as the Membrane Chain. If you want a bit more kill power at the cost of shield punishment and overall options, try this custom.

  • (Alt. Side Special 2 – Scarf Snatch)
This variant returns the move to a command grab, but removes the long membrane thread. Accelgor uses its two “scarves” as appendages to reach forward and grab in front of itself. Obviously, this has much shorter range than normal, and while it has some cooldown as Accelgor reels its scarves back in, it's much less punishable when whiffed than the default variety. If Accelgor grabs an opponent, it has two options. Flicking the control stick backward, Accelgor's scarves will fling the foe behind it, dealing 7% damage with moderate knockback. This is the kind of move you annoying little brother will spam while standing near the side of the screen on walk-off stages. Flicking the control stick forward will cause Accelgor to deliver some rapid jabs to the opponent's stomach, dealing 9% damage, then pushing them away with a final hit. The opponent is put only a short distance away from Accelgor, so it's less safe of an option for more damage. Both throws have their own uses, of course, and can be particularly useful for gimps off-stage.

Down Special – Bug Buzz
Accelgor's go-to power attack in the Pokémon metagame, Bug Buzz is an interesting special move. Simply pressing the input will cause Accelgor to stir, but fail to deliver any sort of attack. Holding the input causes the attack to fully go through, and the move can be held indefinitely thereafter. Accelgor emits visible, green soundwaves in a circular pattern around its body in several thin rings, creating a roughly Bowser-sized field around itself. While Accelgor's entire body is covered, this is actually quite short-ranged. Enemies near Accelgor take 8% damage and are pushed outward from the point of contact, making Bug Buzz a good “get off me” option, despite its slow startup. While the input can be held indefinitely, the soundwaves begin to shrink until 5 seconds of usage brings them to their minimum range, just enough to fit around Accelgor's frame, leaving the sibilating snail vulnerable.

Bug Buzz's key utility comes from its unique properties in completely ignoring shields. The move makes no contact to shields. It does not damage shields at all, and simply ignores them as if they are not present, hitting shielding opponents for full damage and knockback. Punishing rolls with ease, Bug Buzz helps ease some of the pressure off of Accelgor when locked in close-quarters or when dealing with opponents who enjoy shielding a lot. Of course, they might be conditioned to do so in order to block all of those spikes laying around.

  • (Alt. Down Special 1 – Big Buzz)
Accelgor puts all of its energy into a larger, more powerful buzz attack. The soundwaves on this move reach twice the radius of the default's. The attack deals more damage the closer the foe is to Accelgor when hit, with a minimum of 8% and a maximum of 21%. Knockback also scales accordingly to this trend. Foes caught by the rim of the attack only take as much knockback as they would with Bug Buzz, while those right beside Accelgor take high knockback that KO's ~120%. Unlike Bug Buzz, Big Buzz cannot be held indefinitely, and is a singular attack that is used in one burst. The move must be recharged by waiting 8 seconds to use again, or else the attack will fail and leave Accelgor vulnerable. Also unlike the default version of the move, it does not ignore shields. This customization is recommended if you feel a need for more range and kill power, rather than shield-infiltrating utility.

  • (Alt. Down Special 2 – Slug Buzz)
Accelgor emits a lower sound frequency with odd properties, creating circular sound waves around itself that emanate slowly from its core. These rings have a wider radius than Bug Buzz, but smaller than that of Big Buzz. The move can be held indefinitely, never weakening in range or effectiveness, and one ring reaches its max distance over the course of a second. These slow-moving pulses deal no damage, but instead disorient opponents caught within them, causing them to feel sick and sluggish. Enemy movement speed is halved for just under 6 seconds when afflicted by this attack. Like Bug Buzz, Slug Buzz ignores shields. This option is recommended for less experienced players having difficulty landing hits on faster opponents, or for those who like the idea of debuffing a roll-happy opponent.

Up Special – Double Team
Accelgor creates two illusory copies of itself as all three Accelgor instantly boost in their own direction. One Accelgor will travel straight upward, the other at a 45° incline forward, and the last straight forward. Travelling at the speed of Wario's Corkscrew for the distance of Falco's Fire Bird, all three Accelgor follow identical paths save for their trajectories. Accelgor doesn't get the most distance from this recovery, however. At the end of the move, Accelgor will not be placed into special fall, but it will have no jumps remaining.

But which Accelgor is the real one? As with many recoveries, a second input can be made to decide which direction you will travel in. The real Accelgor will always be the one travelling in the direction the player chooses to go, while the other two will be illusions. These illusions can be attacked and will disappear when hit, but they deal no damage to opponents, simply passing through them. All three Accelgor, however, have an accompanying windbox that slightly pushes opponents. You'll want to mix up your direction every now and then to keep your opponents guessing, as the move is fast enough to usually only allow time for one Accelgor to be “gimped”.


  • (Alt. Up Special 1 – Agility)
Accelgor foregoes the trickery of its default Up Special by ditching the illusory copies, simply “vanishing” (it's really just moving too quickly to see) and reappearing in any direction inputted by the player, much like Zelda's, Sheik's, and Mewtwo's recoveries. The max distance on this move is poorer than most recoveries of this type, only going as far as half of Battlefield. The player can carefully use the joystick to reduce this distance even further, even having Accelgor reappear in-place without moving anywhere. Accelgor does not enter special fall after using this move. If you prefer technical application over recovery ability or complex mindgames, this recovery is a good option. Accelgor can ledge cancel this move, as well as warp to the ledge. However, it will not regrab the ledge multiple times. Remember, this isn't Brawl anymore.

  • (Alt. Up Special 2 – Feint)
Accelgor appears to dissolve into thin air, instantly appearing in any of the four cardinal directions inputted. This move travels twice the distance of Double Team, but holding back on the joystick cuts this in half should you want that. When Accelgor reappears from its disappearance, if the player is holding down on the attack button, it appears with a shadowy particle effect, striking with a deceptive blow that stalls its descent briefly and hits hard with 13% damage and decent knockback. After this sneak attack, or if it does not attack at all, it enters special fall. Keep in mind that you will not immediately grab the ledge if you attack out of this move while recovering. As its name suggests, Feint is a sneak attack that hits through shields, actually doing more damage to shielding opponents (18%). If you want to put even more pressure on your opponents and scare them every time you disappear, take this custom for a spin.


Forward Smash – U-turn
Crouching and tensing its body while charging this smash, Accelgor bolts forward head-first, launching itself like a rocket for a distance of one Battlefield platform and bashing opponents it collides with using its helmet-like cranium. If Accelgor contacts an opponent, item, or surface midflight, it rebounds and returns to its previous position. This attack will even rebound if met with a shield, keeping Accelgor safe from being shield punished, though it can be interrupted mid-attack (it has light armor). This Fsmash deals 12-18% damage to opponents and decent knockback, killing vertically around 170% with some charge to it. Somewhat weak for a smash attack, it exemplifies Accelgor's preference for speed and mobility over raw power.

Up Smash – Swift Scatter
Looking upward, Accelgor coolly but forcefully swipes one arm in an arc overhead, releasing a scattered ray of gleaming stars of various sizes seemingly composed of pure light. The stars, sharp as razors, extend in an arc above Accelgor, spreading out as they reach ¾ of Accelgor's own height. A disjointed, multihit attack, it has the potential to deal 15-23% if all hits connect. Due to its range and speed, it's a great antiair, and can hit opponents on low platforms above Accelgor as well. The move has some cooldown, however, and doesn't hit to Accelgor's sides, so a whiff can spell trouble.

Down Smash – Double Team Strike
Extremely quickly, Accelgor disappears in-place, two afterimages appearing to either side of where it was standing, facing one another. The two Accelgor simultaneously strike inward toward each other with both arms, hands touching at the tips. Anyone caught between the two Accelgor is struck for 14-21% damage and popped upward with low knockback growth. The two Accelgor linger in place for 3 frames before the “true” Accelgor reappears in-place.

Unlike most Down Smashes, the attack hits inward rather than to either side of Accelgor, so quick punishes on rollers can be a bit trickier than normal. However, luring an opponent to attack, only to disappear and hit back has its own rewards, including an instant aerial set-up which can potentially be followed up on, and shielding opponents will have trouble blocking a hit from two Accelgor at once. This move is not a counter, however, so while it starts quickly, it can be interrupted. Attacking either of the “clone” Accelgor will cause it to dissipate instantly, but has no effect beyond that.


Jab – Acid Spray
Accelgor's odd-looking, puckered lips allow it to eject poison from its mouth, and that's exactly how they're put to use in its standard jab attack. A three-step jab, this attack consists of a quick palm strike with one hand, followed by an identical hit with the other hand, and finally, a spray of acid from Accelgor's mouth. If the jab is inputted with singular presses, the final hit will be an insulting spit of acid toward the opponent's face, which has high hitstun but no real knockback. The strikes in this three-part series of attacks deal 2%, 2%, and 4% damage, respectively, making for a modestly powerful jab, albeit one with no real knockback potential. If the input it held, Accelgor's final hit will become a rapid jab, whereby it continually spits acid from its mouth, dealing moderate hitstun accompanied by 1% damage per hit. Notably, this acid is corrosive enough to break down barriers, and withers shields away like a knife through butter. Shielding opponents beware! It's much easier to punish Accelgor by avoiding his jab and retaliating than by shielding.

Get Up Attack – Struggle Bug
Red with anger, Accelgor quickly rises to its standing position, striking on either side of itself with its arms, and dealing 5% damage with some knockback. Past 100%, the flustered bug performs a rapid handstand kicking maneuver that hits on either side of itself for 7% and higher knockback.

Ledge Attack – Deceptive Blow
Accelgor rolls onto the stage, quickly turning around and sweeping low with its tail/foot, popping the opponent inches into the air, or tripping them occasionally (4%). Past 100%, the Pokémon rolls onto the stage again, this time hitting forcefully with an extended palm, striking the opponent in the back (8%). Unlike other ledge attacks, Accelgor's work best when the foe is behind it rather than in front of it, connecting correctly against opponents who get too close to the ledge, rather than those who respect Accelgor's space. Place a spike a short distance from the ledge, perhaps, to see how your opponent behaves.

Dash Attack – Flying Foot
As Accelgor is technically airborne while dashing, it performs a “dash” attack by flipping itself around so that its singular, gastropod “foot” is facing forward while boosting a short distance. Holding itself this way causes it to deliver a flying kick to anyone it runs into, dealing mild diagonal knockback and 6% damage. There's a bit of endlag after this move ends, as Accelgor lands on its side, halting its momentum. The move comes out quickly but it still rather telegraphed, so it's not the best move to throw around often, and is best reserved for hard reads or when you know it will hit.

Down Tilt – Snail Slide
Leaning bent backward, low to the ground almost to the point of laying on its back, Accelgor slides forward a short distance, generally comparable to Mega Man's down tilt. Sliding into an opponent pops them weakly into the air and behind Accelgor, allowing the ninja to make a risky but sneaky escape from close combat. This weaker attack deals just 5% damage, but can be useful as a mobility option, especially in escape situations, as previously mentioned.

Forward Tilt – Swift Shot
Accelgor expertly swipes its arm backhanded from its chest as if throwing kunai, instead sending out a collection of small, weak stars of light a short distance in front of itself. Extending ¾ of a Battlefield platform in front of Accelgor, this mid-range projectile attack is relatively fast to come out, so it can be a decent surprise attack from time to time. Knockback is nearly nonexistant, but it can weakly whittle down shields and harass opponents, flinching them and buying Accelgor enough time to either retreat or move in; the maximum damage output is 10%.

Up Tilt – Dual Whip
Accelgor looked upward and raises both arms to whip with extended membranous whips from each limb. A two-hit attack with four hitboxes, Accelgor whips upward for the first strike (4%), then crosses its arms to whip them into a knot for a second hit (5%). The first hit is a weak flincher that usually links well into the second, which launches upward, and is a weak kill option for finishing off stubborn survivors around 200%. The whips themselves give the attack quite some range for a normal tilt attack, reaching just below the top Battlefield platform.


Neutral Aerial – Snail Spiral
Accelgor presses its hands together and closes its eyes in concentration as it horizontally spins twice, in a manner similar to Marth's Nair. The scarf around Accelgor's neck extends slightly, whipping opponents who get too close. With horizontal range slightly outclassing Marth's Nair, it's Accelgor's go-to “get off me” option in the air, smacking opponents for mild knockback comparable to Villager's Nair and 8% damage. The second spin has a different hitbox at the end of the animation that sourspots for negligible knockback and 5% damage, so a little precision is required to make the most of the move. Landing lag is mild, but not ignorable.

Up Aerial – Ninja Flip
Displaying expert acrobatic skill, Accelgor performs an aerial backflip, hitting with its foot and dealing 7% with low diagonal knockback. The animation is your archetypical flip kick up aerial, similar to Mario or Pac-Man, but with a bit of tokusatsu flair as Accelgor raises its arms over its head, striking a pose. The entire animation is incredibly quick, easily able to fit two into a shorthop. The attack also has low landing lag, making it quite a spammable technique. Its low knockback is offset by its ability to chain together into itself multiple times, though some accuracy is required due to its short range.

Forward Aerial – Swift Slice
Accelgor quickly chops downward with one arm. This crafty ninja strike comes in two flavors to mix things up against your opponents. A light input will cause Accelgor to send out a short-range disjointed series of small, flinching hitboxes in the form of tiny Swift stars. The range is slightly longer than that of Mega Man's Fair, and the move is a great harassment option out of a shorthop, especially while retreating. When all hits connect, you can expect to deal 11% damage. A “smashed” input, on the other hand, replaces the stream of stardust with one single, large Swift star, which Accelgor grips and slices with like a blade. This deals a more solid, meaty hit of an impressive 14%, as well as knockback reminiscent of Sheik's Fair, but with a more downward trajectory. This version of the move has paltry range, unfortunately, and comes out and ends so quickly that precise timing is needed to avoid whiffing and getting punished. Both versions of this move have moderate landing lag, but Accelgor's fall and jump speed still allow it to throw these out alongside shorthops rather quickly.

Downward Aerial – Thousand Strikes
Accelgor rapidly jabs below itself, alternating arms. These lightning fast punches trap opponents, in the same vein of Dairs as Yoshi and Peach. Delivering blows so fast that only motion blurs can be seen at normal game speed, Accelgor gives its opponent up to 16% damage. If the final hit lands, the opponent is lightly meteor smashed (if aerial) or put into prone (if standing), allowing for some interesting scenarios to unfold. If Accelgor fails to deal the finishing blow, the opponent suffers only mild flinching and is put at a frame advantage, leaving Accelgor vulnerable to counterattack. Out of all of Accelgor's aerials, this attack has the highest landing lag, but it's not exactly bad in that regard.

Backward Aerial – Spiral Kick
Accelgor positions itself so that it's horizontal in the air while spinning, delivering a multihit spin kick to foes behind itself. Similar in animation to Greninja's or Sheik's Up Aerials, only in a sideways position, the attack links together many small hits before releasing the opponent outward. Enemies take a maximum of 10% from this attack. The total knockback is rather weak, so it's not a great off-stage finisher, but if positioned correctly, multiple instances of this move can gimp opponents. Quite fast to execute, Accelgor can throw this move out while approaching, jumping, retreating, or just about whenever it wants, but beware the landing lag on this attack, which is the second highest of Accelgor's aerials.



Grab
In a short-ranged grab, Accelgor grabs with a lightning-fast, motion-blurred extension of one arm, like a warrior in training attempting to catch a fly in midflight. Staring coldly at the opponent with that odd expression it has, it delivers a painful upward jab to the abdomen with its other arm. A mid-speed grab attack, it deals 2% per hit, so it's usually a better option to just toss the opponent before they break out of your grip.

...Or it would be, except for Sticky Hold. Accelgor's iron-tight grip is not limited to simply the items that it grabs; it applies to its opponents as well. Players grabbed by Accelgor will find it 1.5x harder than normal to break out of its grasp, which allows the Pokémon to fit in an extra grab attack or two to rack up some more damage before disposing of its captive.

Down Throw – Swift Execution
Accelgor forcefully tosses the opponent to the ground, hops over the opponent's prone body, and tosses a rapid volley of small Swift stars at them, each hit dealing flinch frames and 1% damage, for a total of 10% overall. Accelgor lands on the other side of the opponent. The opponent is left in prone after this throw ends, forcing them to make a decision in how they will respond.

Back Throw – Water Shuriken
Showing up Greninja at its own game, Accelgor makes use of the Water Shuriken technique that it can also learn. With a backward swing of the arm, Accelgor tosses the opponent 75° into the air behind itself (5% damage). Without even looking back, it tosses a single, small Water Shuriken at the opponent (4% damage), and this can actually be aimed slightly within the range of about 15 degrees, allowing a smart reader to lay the pain on an opponent who tries to DI out of hitstun at low percents. If the shuriken connects, which it usually will unless another opponent attacks the target or Accelgor is interrupted, the target is actually lightly bounced back toward Accelgor, usually ending up in the air a few feet above the Pokémon. Hint: Try to get a follow-up off of this, obviously.

Forward Throw – Pressure Point
Accelgor rapidly jabs at its opponent at different points on their body, attacking their nervous system to briefly stun them. Opponents are left paralyzed in a manner identical to Zero Suit's stun gun or Pac-Man's bell, and will be stunned longer the more damage they've accumulated. While paralyzed, opponents cannot be regrabbed. This “throw” deals 8% damage with no knockback to speak of.

Up Throw – Whiplash
Using motion blur to near-instantly wrap the opponent in a coat of its membrane, Accelgor tosses the opponent upward while they're tied to a leash. Accelgor always tosses the opponent the same distance of 1.5 Batlefield platforms, but unlike other throws, the player can input a secondary direction on the joystick to have Accelgor throw them at any angle between 45° and 135°. At the extent of the throw, Accelgor yanks back on the membranous leash, causing the foe to slam back into the ground beside it, instantly tearing their own membrane coat apart and bouncing them off of the ground, possibly for a follow-up. Opponents can be tossed through a jump-through platform, but when yanked back, will be slammed into the platform instead of returning to Accelgor, allowing the player to get a little tricky with how they use this move. The opponent is dealt 10% damage. Overall, the entire process for this attack is about 80 frames.


Double Team Split Strike


Accelgor employs two different Pokémon techniques for its Final Smash. To activate the attack, the opponent(s) must be within a short distance of Accelgor, who will cast out a glowing pulse of light to ensnare the foe(s). Once the opponent is locked into place, Accelgor glows, using the move Guard Split to average its own defenses with that of its victim(s). Since Accelgor's defenses are so low, the enemy becomes lightweight. Then, the camera zooms in on Accelgor, whose eye glints, and then immediately splits into 6 of itself using Double Team. The illusory copies then begin dashing at the trapped enemies one at a time, slicing through them with ninja-like strikes that deal 10% damage each, for 50% total. The original Accelgor delivers the final blow, dealing 20% damage, with a concentrated strike from a single arm, sending the opponent(s) flying off-stage, and likely to their doom.


Now that we've gone over each individual move, we can discuss some of the more advanced applications of those moves.

One of Accelgor's moveset cornerstones are its spikes, which, like any item, can be played around with in a number of ways. Instead of just picking them up and repeatedly throwing them at your opponent, try Z-dropping them. Most characters with item-based moves, like Link, Peach, and Mega Man, make usage of Z-dropping to great effect. Z-dropping a spike is not only a very fast and unexpected move out of a shorthop, footstool, or shield jump, but the great hit stun it provides opens up a gateway for any number of follow-ups, leading into combos or even a repeating cycle of footstools and Z-drops.

Accelgor's Membrane Chain is a great utility move for snaring opponents from afar, but did you know that it can be platform canceled? Short-hop into or drop through a platform while this move comes out to cancel it early. This allows Accelgor to cast its thread quickly without suffering from the consequence of high cooldown should it miss. Accelgor can act out of a platform-canceled Membrane Chain almost instantly, making the move far less commital. However, the full length of the membrane won't come out when the move is canceled, so keep that in mind.

Accelgor can perform a Spike-Canceled Up Throw using careful positioning. Aiming an opponent into a spike resting on a platform is a great way to build some damage, and if the platform is nearby, you can even follow-up on the hitstun, because an opponent tossed into a spike is instantly freed from the membrane cloak. This breaks the thread as well, canceling Accelgor's Uthrow animation entirely. This move will be canceled whether the opponent hits a spike on their way outward or inward, allowing this somewhat lengthy throw to be sped up considerably. While you won't get the 10% damage from the throw and will have to settle for 5% from a spike, the high flinch effect provided by spikes can allow you to follow up for potentially even more damaging blows.

One of Accelgor's best kill moves, despite being a weak Smash overall, is its Fsmash, U-turn, which, while relatively safe, also has the dishonor of being one of its most telegraphed moves. Like Diddy Kong's infamous glide tossed banana into Fsmash finish, however, Accelgor can mitigate this somewhat. Glide-tossing a spike has enough reliable stun to almost guarantee that your Fsmash will go off successfully, so keep that in mind if you find yourself fruitlessly fishing for kills.

Accelgor is pretty good at keeping strings going. Some makeshift combos include:
  • Bthrow (land shuriken) → Utilt → jump → Uair, Uair, Uair, etc.
  • Uthrow (direct into spike) → short shop Fair → Dtilt → (at lower percents) approaching Bair
  • Short hop Nair (land) → Dtilt → pivot Membrane Chain




Where do we begin to break down Accelgor? As a ninja, it's a master of trickery and deception. The key objective is to keep pressure on the opponent and ensure that they keep second-guessing themselves, always forcing them to worry about stepping out of line, making the wrong move, or attacking at the wrong time. Accelgor relies on blazing speed and perfect maneuverability to completely overwhelm its opponents. A well-honed Accelgor player should be able to make full use of speed and control to be anywhere on-screen that they need to be at the drop of a hat. Accelgor has no shortage of ways to approach, chase, or retreat, with an excellent short hop aerial game, evasive maneuvers such as Down Tilt and even Up Special to fool it its foes into hopelessly chasing it around the map. Even DI'ing opponents have Accelgor's sheer speed to fear, as the shinobi snail has plenty of ways to maneuver around a foe trying to escape its strings of attacks. Accelgor's raw pressure, when applied correctly, makes it very difficult for even skilled players to stay on their toes and think ahead to avoid eating a series of hits.

Accelgor is designed to shut down many of the overcentralizing strengths of Smash 4's powerful shields and grab punishes. Accelgor's Spikes afford great stage control, at the cost of making the arena a bit more dangerous and difficult to navigate for Accelgor as well. The great flinching capabilities of spikes make navigating the stage a feared task for most players, as a single slip-up could lead to dangerous capitalization on the part of Accelgor. Moves such as Ftilt, Jab, Fair, and Usmash bully opponents who don't respect Accelgor's space, pressuring them near spikes and giving them scant room to breathe. Such moves, Spikes included, will also condition foes into throwing out their shields often to avoid taking avoidable damage, only to be punished with a grab or hard read. As a stealthy infiltrator, Accelgor thrives on reading shields and rolls, and has a clear disrespect for shields. While its Dsmash has trouble covering its side, Bug Buzz punishes rollers like no one's business, completely ignoring shields, and Fsmash allows Accelgor to keep up the pressure without fear of being shield-grabbed. Opponents who pick up on these tricks may learn to stop shielding and instead approach Accelgor with short-hopped aerials, dash attacks, or pivoted ground attacks, to which Accelgor may respond with a coy Dsmash to catch them off guard yet again, or respond by jumping out of shield with a Z-dropped spike, never letting the opponent become securely confident in any of their options. Spikes are Accelgor's key tool, and its best close-quarters options are enabled through the use of them as a holdable item, always a reliable tactic thanks to Sticky Hold. Contrarily, without a spike, many of Accelgor's low-knockback, short-ranged close combat options are punishable and weak, which gives it the disadvantage at taking on stronger characters at close-range, specifically struggling with the likes of Mario, Captain Falcon, and Link.

Accelgor generally excels at bringing its opponent nearer to it, or bringing itself nearer to its opponent. While it can close distances and even create space well, it struggles with launching and finishing opponents. Many of its attacks that send opponents away, such as Membrane Chain, Up Throw, and Back Throw, are just as capable of bringing them back closer to Accelgor. Many attacks of this type are designed to put the enemy wherever Accelgor wants them. From that point, it's as simple as navigating Accelgor to that position for a follow-up. Dair and Down Throw force the opponent into positions where they must choose a way to get up, often leaving them little place to go with spikes lying around. They'll often be forced to take the hit from a spike, or simply use their get-up attack, and a smart Accelgor will know how limited these options are and punish accordingly. Membrane Chain is another cornerstone in Accelgor's playstyle, being a lengthy command grab that, like many of Accelgor's other moves, punishes shielders and makes a mockery of the very concept of shielding. Accelgor can approach or retreat while throwing out Membrane Chain when it's platform canceled, but must understand its length in order to not leave itself vulnerable under normal circumstances. Up close, the mid-ranged attack is liable to whiff, guaranteeing the opponent a punish, and from too far a distance, Accelgor is left open for a rushdown; like Bug Buzz, the Membrane Chain will often require a hard read to land and avoid being punished. Membrane Chain is an excellent way to increase the application of Accelgor's spikes, as it can tip the chain with the barbed weapon and open up longer-ranged hitstun options, all without ditching the item in question, as it would with a throw. Membrane Chain can also bring spikes straight to Accelgor's hands, allowing it to pick up its treasured items without having to get too close to risk taking damage from them. A hard read to snag opponents with this versatile special move can reset a combo chain on a fleeing opponent or even secure a kill, as the outward input on this move leads to one of Accelgor's strongest kill options.

While Accelgor has great strengths and a toolshed of options for mixups and general scenarios, it's not without weaknesses. As a fighter of extremes – extreme speed, extreme pressure, extremely light weight – it has both hard strengths and hard weaknesses. Its light weight keeps it from surviving for very long if it finds itself hit by a strong enough move, a major problem for a character with an easily outranged and outprioritized Dair. Because it tends to die early, Accelgor isn't very effective at taking advantage of rage, which can be frustrating for the little bug that already struggles to KO. If you play your cards right, you can net your earliest kills through actions such as getting a Dair meteor smash (best in conjunction with a footstool) or by stage-spiking with Bair. Returning to the stage can sometimes be difficult, especially when knocked at a low trajectory. Accelgor will often be sent flying far, and while its jumps are excellent, it falls quickly, and doesn't have the longest-ranging recovery move out there. Luckily, it can augment this somewhat thanks to its ability to wall-jump.

Accelgor is determined to demonstrate its well-honed ninja techniques in the Smash Bros. arena. A mix-up magician with a great combo, punish, and anti-defensive game, Accelgor forces opponents to adapt to a playstyle that most Smash 4 characters are uncomfortable with. As the millionth ninja character in MYM, you basically know the drill by now. Overwhelm your enemies with disorienting speed and keep them under your constant control. Never let your target out of your sights until the deed is done. Prospective Smashers looking to play as Accelgor, come out of your shells and show everyone what it means to be insane in the membrane.


Taunts
  • Up Taunt – Accelgor utters its own name as it performs a backflip, lands on its “foot”, and strikes a pose with one arm raised.
  • Side Taunt – Closing its eyes and holding its hands together, Accelgor creates illusory copies of itself by rapidly shifting back and forth.
  • Down Taunt – Accelgor sternly glares forward while brandishing an extension of membrane at its side, hitting the ground with a cracking whip sound.

Results Screen
  • Victory 1 – Accelgor rapidly tosses gleaming Swift stars in various directions, then dynamically crosses its arms while facing the camera as the announcer calls its name.
  • Victory 2 – Accelgor simply stands still as an unmoving rock, eyes scowling at the camera as its scarf flows dynamically.
  • Victory 3 – Accelgor, in a blur, rushes on-screen and stops dead-center. With its arms crossed, it turns its head slightly, saying “Accel...Gor!” as it insultingly spits a drop of acid at the ground.
  • Loss – Rather than clap, as most characters do, Accelgor stands, motionless, with its back toward the camera, head slightly turned to view the victor out of the corner of its eye with spite.

Battle Entrance – Accelgor drops down from a classic-style trade cable, as featured during Pokémon trades.

Boxing Ring TitleMach-Speed Mollusk

Kirby Hat – Kirby receives a hat that resembles Accelgor's motocross-like helmet, and gains the ability to use Spikes in the same manner as Accelgor.

Trophies
  • Accelgor
The Shell Out Pokémon, Accelgor is the evolved form of Shelmet. When Karrablast stole its shell, Accelgor took up a swift fighting style. It fights with the speed and skill of a ninja, which sometimes puts it at odds with the brutish and defensive Escavalier. Maybe the two can sort out their differences one day?
[DS: Pokémon Black and Pokémon White (3/2011)]
[DS: Pokémon Black 2 and Pokémon White 2 (10/12)]
  • Accelgor (alt.)
Accelgor's Down Special Bug Buzz has limited range, but completely ignores shields. If you find your opponent shielding often, try using this move to put an end to their shenanigans. Watch out for attacks that can power through your cover, though!
[DS: Pokémon Black and Pokémon White (3/2011)]
[DS: Pokémon Black 2 and Pokémon White 2 (10/12)]
  • Double Team Split Strike
This wordy ninja technique is Accelgor's Final Smash, which sees the Pokémon first lower the target's knockback resistance with Guard Split before using Double Team to copy itself several times over, and begin striking from various angles. The final hit is delivered by the original Accelgor, and will likely seal a KO for your hard work as the target is sent flying. Try using your Membrane Chain to snag opponents trying to avoid your attack.
 
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Roy Moveset
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
http://fireemblem.wikia.com/wiki/Roy

Statistics
Roy is about the size of Marth, and is slightly heavier, but more powerful.

Standard Attacks

Neutral Attack:
I figured that his double-edge dance would work as a good Jab, removing the flame effect and making him not move forward so much. There also aren't any variations, all of the slashes come out as the neutral variations.

Side Tilt:
Roy thrusts his sword forward, similar to his normal attack animation (like for many rapier-based Lords) in Binding Blade. It has considerable range and power, with low start and end lag.

Down Tilt: Like the end slash of the Double-Edge Dance when tilted to it's downward variation.

Up Tilt: Like the end slash of the Double-Edge Dance when tilted to it's upward variation, except it goes more above him than the upward tilted end slash of DED.

Dash Attack: Similar to Ike's Side Tilt, except much quicker and he slides just as much as with the old Dash Attack.

Aerial Attacks

Neutral Air:
He swings his sword around him in almost a complete circle.

Side Air: Like his Side Tilt except in the air. Has low startup lag but higher ending lag.

Back Air: Similar to Ike, Roy performs a quick horizontal outward slash behind him. Can turn Roy around. Very low start lag, but very high end lag, with average landing lag.

Down Air: The same as his old Down Air except it comes out at the speed on Samus' down air, and has a flame effect.

Up Air: Similar to his old Up Air except with a completely different hitbox and looks different. You do not see the arc as he swings the sword round from a different angle. Let's just say that if you paused and rotated the camera while he was using it, it would look like his original Up Air.

Smash Attacks

Forward Smash:
This is like Ike's Side Tilt, except faster and, of course, can be charged. I felt the need to change this otherwise it would just be a ripoff of his Flare Blade.

Down Smash: A low outward slash that goes in almost a complete circle. Similar to his Neutral Air.

Up Smash: His old Up Tilt, except it has a flame effect, and can, of course, be charged.

Special Attacks


Neutral Special:
Flare Blade. Roy charges his sword for a powerful overhead slash, which can cause a flame effect. The power of the attack increases the longer it is held, with an powerful explosion effect occurring if the charge is complete, which can also break shields. However, the explosion damages Roy 10% in the process.

Side Special: Holocauster. He rushes sideways with his flaming sword, burning opponents within his reach. It also goes slightly upwards, making it usable as a vertical recovery move, but it goes much further horizontally. The distance is similar to that of Captain Falcon's Raptor Boost.

Down Special: Counter. But not a normal counter. He puts his sword into the defence position, making the counter noise. Any attack will be absorbed by this, but will also immediately end the counter. Once he has used this move 5 times, the next time he uses it, he will strike

Up Special: Blazer. Roy soars upwards with his flaming sword, burning opponents within his reach. Similar to Marth's Dolphin Slash, though noticeably different in that it hits multiple times, is slower, and has significant hang time, giving Roy somewhat of an advantage against impromptu edge-guard attempts. The move's animation in Project M has been modified as a reference to the Ryuuenjin (Dragon Flame Blade) used by Zero in Mega Man X4 and Capcom's Vs. series of games.

Final Smash
The same as the one in Project M.

Throws

Forward Throw: Roy lets go of his opponent, but before they touch the ground he hits them with his knee, sending them away, like with Captain Falcon's Knee.

Back Throw: Same as original.

Down Throw: He drops his opponent onto the ground, then stabs them with his sword, afterwards sending them up into the air.

Up Throw: Same as original.

Miscellaneous

Grab:
Same as original.

Pummel:
Similar to his old one, except he kicks rather than using his knee.

Ground Attack 1:
Roy swings his sword around him, like with his neutral air.

Ground Attack 2:
He swings his sword on one side, then the other. Slower than his Ground Attack 1.

Ledge Attack 1:
Same as his old Ledge Attack 1.

Ledge Attack 2:
Same as his old Ledge Attack 2.

Sidestep Dodge:
Same as original.

Roll Dodge:
A roll. What did you expect?

Clapping Animation:
Same as his old clap.

Victory Pose 1:
Same as original...

Victory Pose 2:
Do I really need to say it again? LOL

Finished! I hope you like it.
 
Last edited:

Smash Daddy

Smash Master
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Hey @ Smash Daddy Smash Daddy , it says in the User Rankings FAQ that you would change someone's banner if they requested it. Could you change mine when you get a chance? I've made a background for it:
Thanks! :)
Sure, I've got to make loads of new banners for all the recent newcomers, I'll make a new one for you around then.
 
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One Day set coming in, beware.


Wraps things up!

The Bug-type Pokémon #617, Accelgor, is the evolved form of Shelmet. Once a meak and wholly defensive mollusk-like creature, Shelmet loses its heavy shell upon evolution, spurred by being traded for a Karrablast. While Karrablast steals poor Shelmet's carapace to become the armored and knightly Escavalier, Shelmet benefits from this theft by trading its sedentary lifestyle for blazing, ninja-like speed as Accelgor. Few Pokémon manage to reach the mach speeds that this ironically swift snail attains, and it uses this to its advantage to overwhelm its opponents with overwhelmingly quick ninja-like movements. Since it has lost its shell, it wraps itself in numerous layers of a thin membrane to keep itself hydrated. Accelgor brings its gastropodular ninjutsu to the Smash Bros. arena, because nothing says 'hype' in MYM like yet another ninja moveset.

While Accelgor can have one of three different abilities, in its Smash Bros. appearance, the Sticky Hold ability is most directly featured. Thanks to Sticky Hold, Accelgor cannot be forced to drop an item. Unlike other characters, who are prone to drop held items from time to time while taking knockback, Accelgor will never lose hold of any item in its grip. As to be expected, it moves with quick, dynamic, ninja-like motions. Due to its lack of legs, it forcefully launches itself from a standing position to “fly” across the ground for its dash animation. Unlike fellow ninja Pokémon Greninja, Accelgor doesn't vanish while dodging, but it has a very fluid and swift dodge roll nonetheless. Like other ninja-like fighters, it is capable of performing the wall jump and wall cling techniques.


Size – 4
Weight – 2
Ground Speed – 9
Traction – 10
Air Speed - 9
Fall Speed - 8
Jump – 8


At 2'7'' in canon, Accelgor is rather diminutive for a fully-evolved Pokémon. Nonetheless, it is slightly scaled up for Smash, as with most Pokémon combatants, and is close to Villager in model size. It has most of the benefits bestowed upon characters of its type: small frame, great speed, excellent traction, and a decent fall speed. While not quite as quick to reach back down as Greninja, it sits comfortably near Mega Man in regard to gravity. Combined with an excellent jump height (a full first and second jump easily getting it to the highest platforms in Skyloft) and equally quick ground and air speeds, Accelgor can move to and fro with ease, able to be exactly wherever it needs to be as the player wills. In fact, stacked up against the canon roster, Accelgor is the second fastest character, ahead of Captain Falcon but slightly behind Sonic.

Accelgor's major disadvantage is its characteristic light weight, sharing a tier with Mr. Game & Watch and ultimately being very poor at surviving powerful blows. Coupled with this problem is Accelgor's smaller than average shield, making it a hassle at times to survive into the higher percentages.


Neutral Special – Spikes


Spikes is a move that Accelgor can learn through breeding, and due to the great utility of the move, this Pokémon is quite often seen using it. In the Pokémon series, Spikes functions as a move that lays – you guessed it – barbed spikes (which resemble caltrops) on the ground, providing a trap that injures opponents that fall onto them. The move works much the same way in Smash Bros. With a press of the button, Accelgor pulls a single jack-like spike, about the size of a Freezie, out from hammerspace, and tosses it forward with both arms straight. The animation for this action is about as long as Pac-Man's fruit throw, and like Pac-Man's fruit, the spike functions as an item, and it lands about 1/3 of Battlefield's length away from Accelgor. The move can be charged exactly in the same way as Sheik's needles, allowing Accelgor to toss more spikes at once, up to 5 total. When tossing multiple spikes, Accelgor will throw them in a cluster, so they will all fly in roughly the same direction, but land at different locations in front of Accelgor, though their max range is still 1/3 of Battlefield's length. Spikes deal 8% damage when tossed at an opponent, and 4% damage every time they are touched once resting upon the ground. In any case, contact with a spike is quite painful for Accelgor's opponents, and notably, they suffer higher than average flinch frames.

Accelgor can also be hurt by its own spikes, so you'll want to be careful when attempting to pick them up. As they are items, individual spikes can be picked up and thrown again, and this is a tactic Accelgor can make excellent use of due to their high hitstun. Enemies may also grab spikes, but are easily prone to dropping them when attacked, risking further injuring contact with the dangerous traps. Luckily for Accelgor, Sticky Hold ensures that it will never drop one of its spikes, keeping it safe and secure to pick them up and carry them without risk of suffering unnecessary damage. There can be up to 5 spikes per Accelgor on the map, and unlike other items, retossing a spike doesn't dispose of it, but simply relocates it. Spikes will disappear after 20 seconds.

  • (Alt. Neutral Special 1 – Snagging Spikes)
Working much the same way as the default special, Accelgor tosses a different kind of spike that pierces into opponents it contacts, dealing 1% damage each every second until they fall off after 7 seconds. With mutiple spikes, this can rack up a lot of damage in a short amount of time. Tossed spikes can be shielded, but their damage cannot be shielded against once attached. Unlike normal spikes, snagging spikes are strictly projectiles and cannot be picked up as items, preventing Accelgor from using them manually. These spikes disappear after 15 seconds.

  • (Alt. Neutral Special 2 – Toxic Spikes)
Accelgor throws out up to 5 spikes as normal. This time, they are colored purple instead of a generic metallic gray. Rather than flinching opponents and dealing direct damage, toxic spikes, when contacted, ooze a horrid toxin that poisons the opponent, giving them a purple “poisoned” aura and dealing 1-2% per second for 5 seconds. This stacks if an additional spike is contacted while poisoned, doubling the damage output. The damage does not increased if a third spike makes contact. Toxic spikes can be picked up, but will deal 1% damage for every second they are held. Toxic spikes disappear after 10 seconds.

Side Special – Membrane Chain
Expertly uncoiling some of its protective membrane from its arm, Accelgor performs a very quick-to-start attack in which it flicks its arms and casts out a long strand of membrane. The rope-like material travels straight for half of Battlefield's length, lingering at its maximum length for a few frames before immediately snapping back to Accelgor. The sticky membrane attaches itself to any opponent or item it contacts, functioning as a command grab, and as soon as it does so, Accelgor is left vulnerable to other opponents until it makes another input. Yes, Accelgor uses its membrane as a chain dart. “Get over here!”, indeed.

In a less gory take on Scorpion's infamous spear technique, if the control stick is flicked inward, Accelgor will give a forceful tug and pull its target toward itself, briefly flinching opponents but dealing no damage. This leaves both combatants in immediate proximity of one another, with Accelgor at a slight frame advantage. If the control stick is flicked outward, Accelgor reels itself in, rocketing itself into the target and sending it flying. Against opponents, this causes a heavy impact that deals 13% damage and moderate knockback killing outwards at 160%. For extra damage, activating this move while holding a spike will cause it to attach to the end of the whip, impaling enemies when it makes contact and dealing 9% damage, though this removes the attack's command grab properties. Quick to start and quick to end, this attack can be disorienting for opponents and can set Accelgor up for any number of combo options, or at least net the Bug-type an item from afar. A useful technique for closing distances or punishing rolls, the Membrane Chain is a move best used smartly, as despite activating quickly, failing to connect with this move leaves Accelgor quite vulnerable.

  • (Alt. Side Special 1 – Whip Wrap)
Accelgor casts out a thread of its membrane as normal. This time, however, its grabbox is replaced with a hitbox, and it whips the opponent. The entire length of the thread is a hitbox, but only the tip does significant damage and knockback, causing 14% with decent kill power. The rest of the thread is a sourspot that deals 4% damage and hardly launches the opponent. This attack is twice as fast to complete as the Membrane Chain. If you want a bit more kill power at the cost of shield punishment and overall options, try this custom.

  • (Alt. Side Special 2 – Scarf Snatch)
This variant returns the move to a command grab, but removes the long membrane thread. Accelgor uses its two “scarves” as appendages to reach forward and grab in front of itself. Obviously, this has much shorter range than normal, and while it has some cooldown as Accelgor reels its scarves back in, it's much less punishable when whiffed than the default variety. If Accelgor grabs an opponent, it has two options. Flicking the control stick backward, Accelgor's scarves will fling the foe behind it, dealing 7% damage with moderate knockback. This is the kind of move you annoying little brother will spam while standing near the side of the screen on walk-off stages. Flicking the control stick forward will cause Accelgor to deliver some rapid jabs to the opponent's stomach, dealing 9% damage, then pushing them away with a final hit. The opponent is put only a short distance away from Accelgor, so it's less safe of an option for more damage. Both throws have their own uses, of course, and can be particularly useful for gimps off-stage.

Down Special – Bug Buzz
Accelgor's go-to power attack in the Pokémon metagame, Bug Buzz is an interesting special move. Simply pressing the input will cause Accelgor to stir, but fail to deliver any sort of attack. Holding the input causes the attack to fully go through, and the move can be held indefinitely thereafter. Accelgor emits visible, green soundwaves in a circular pattern around its body in several thin rings, creating a roughly Bowser-sized field around itself. While Accelgor's entire body is covered, this is actually quite short-ranged. Enemies near Accelgor take 8% damage and are pushed outward from the point of contact, making Bug Buzz a good “get off me” option, despite its slow startup. While the input can be held indefinitely, the soundwaves begin to shrink until 5 seconds of usage brings them to their minimum range, just enough to fit around Accelgor's frame, leaving the sibilating snail vulnerable.

Bug Buzz's key utility comes from its unique properties in completely ignoring shields. The move makes no contact to shields. It does not damage shields at all, and simply ignores them as if they are not present, hitting shielding opponents for full damage and knockback. Punishing rolls with ease, Bug Buzz helps ease some of the pressure off of Accelgor when locked in close-quarters or when dealing with opponents who enjoy shielding a lot. Of course, they might be conditioned to do so in order to block all of those spikes laying around.

  • (Alt. Down Special 1 – Big Buzz)
Accelgor puts all of its energy into a larger, more powerful buzz attack. The soundwaves on this move reach twice the radius of the default's. The attack deals more damage the closer the foe is to Accelgor when hit, with a minimum of 8% and a maximum of 21%. Knockback also scales accordingly to this trend. Foes caught by the rim of the attack only take as much knockback as they would with Bug Buzz, while those right beside Accelgor take high knockback that KO's ~120%. Unlike Bug Buzz, Big Buzz cannot be held indefinitely, and is a singular attack that is used in one burst. The move must be recharged by waiting 8 seconds to use again, or else the attack will fail and leave Accelgor vulnerable. Also unlike the default version of the move, it does not ignore shields. This customization is recommended if you feel a need for more range and kill power, rather than shield-infiltrating utility.

  • (Alt. Down Special 2 – Slug Buzz)
Accelgor emits a lower sound frequency with odd properties, creating circular sound waves around itself that emanate slowly from its core. These rings have a wider radius than Bug Buzz, but smaller than that of Big Buzz. The move can be held indefinitely, never weakening in range or effectiveness, and one ring reaches its max distance over the course of a second. These slow-moving pulses deal no damage, but instead disorient opponents caught within them, causing them to feel sick and sluggish. Enemy movement speed is halved for just under 6 seconds when afflicted by this attack. Like Bug Buzz, Slug Buzz ignores shields. This option is recommended for less experienced players having difficulty landing hits on faster opponents, or for those who like the idea of debuffing a roll-happy opponent.

Up Special – Double Team
Accelgor creates two illusory copies of itself as all three Accelgor instantly boost in their own direction. One Accelgor will travel straight upward, the other at a 45° incline forward, and the last straight forward. Travelling at the speed of Wario's Corkscrew for the distance of Falco's Fire Bird, all three Accelgor follow identical paths save for their trajectories. Accelgor doesn't get the most distance from this recovery, however. At the end of the move, Accelgor will not be placed into special fall, but it will have no jumps remaining.

But which Accelgor is the real one? As with many recoveries, a second input can be made to decide which direction you will travel in. The real Accelgor will always be the one travelling in the direction the player chooses to go, while the other two will be illusions. These illusions can be attacked and will disappear when hit, but they deal no damage to opponents, simply passing through them. All three Accelgor, however, have an accompanying windbox that slightly pushes opponents. You'll want to mix up your direction every now and then to keep your opponents guessing, as the move is fast enough to usually only allow time for one Accelgor to be “gimped”.


  • (Alt. Up Special 1 – Agility)
Accelgor foregoes the trickery of its default Up Special by ditching the illusory copies, simply “vanishing” (it's really just moving too quickly to see) and reappearing in any direction inputted by the player, much like Zelda's, Sheik's, and Mewtwo's recoveries. The max distance on this move is poorer than most recoveries of this type, only going as far as half of Battlefield. The player can carefully use the joystick to reduce this distance even further, even having Accelgor reappear in-place without moving anywhere. Accelgor does not enter special fall after using this move. If you prefer technical application over recovery ability or complex mindgames, this recovery is a good option. Accelgor can ledge cancel this move, as well as warp to the ledge. However, it will not regrab the ledge multiple times. Remember, this isn't Brawl anymore.

  • (Alt. Up Special 2 – Feint)
Accelgor appears to dissolve into thin air, instantly appearing in any of the four cardinal directions inputted. This move travels twice the distance of Double Team, but holding back on the joystick cuts this in half should you want that. When Accelgor reappears from its disappearance, if the player is holding down on the attack button, it appears with a shadowy particle effect, striking with a deceptive blow that stalls its descent briefly and hits hard with 13% damage and decent knockback. After this sneak attack, or if it does not attack at all, it enters special fall. Keep in mind that you will not immediately grab the ledge if you attack out of this move while recovering. As its name suggests, Feint is a sneak attack that hits through shields, actually doing more damage to shielding opponents (18%). If you want to put even more pressure on your opponents and scare them every time you disappear, take this custom for a spin.


Forward Smash – U-turn
Crouching and tensing its body while charging this smash, Accelgor bolts forward head-first, launching itself like a rocket for a distance of one Battlefield platform and bashing opponents it collides with using its helmet-like cranium. If Accelgor contacts an opponent, item, or surface midflight, it rebounds and returns to its previous position. This attack will even rebound if met with a shield, keeping Accelgor safe from being shield punished, though it can be interrupted mid-attack (it has light armor). This Fsmash deals 12-18% damage to opponents and decent knockback, killing vertically around 170% with some charge to it. Somewhat weak for a smash attack, it exemplifies Accelgor's preference for speed and mobility over raw power.

Up Smash – Swift Scatter
Looking upward, Accelgor coolly but forcefully swipes one arm in an arc overhead, releasing a scattered ray of gleaming stars of various sizes seemingly composed of pure light. The stars, sharp as razors, extend in an arc above Accelgor, spreading out as they reach ¾ of Accelgor's own height. A disjointed, multihit attack, it has the potential to deal 15-23% if all hits connect. Due to its range and speed, it's a great antiair, and can hit opponents on low platforms above Accelgor as well. The move has some cooldown, however, and doesn't hit to Accelgor's sides, so a whiff can spell trouble.

Down Smash – Double Team Strike
Extremely quickly, Accelgor disappears in-place, two afterimages appearing to either side of where it was standing, facing one another. The two Accelgor simultaneously strike inward toward each other with both arms, hands touching at the tips. Anyone caught between the two Accelgor is struck for 14-21% damage and popped upward with low knockback growth. The two Accelgor linger in place for 3 frames before the “true” Accelgor reappears in-place.

Unlike most Down Smashes, the attack hits inward rather than to either side of Accelgor, so quick punishes on rollers can be a bit trickier than normal. However, luring an opponent to attack, only to disappear and hit back has its own rewards, including an instant aerial set-up which can potentially be followed up on, and shielding opponents will have trouble blocking a hit from two Accelgor at once. This move is not a counter, however, so while it starts quickly, it can be interrupted. Attacking either of the “clone” Accelgor will cause it to dissipate instantly, but has no effect beyond that.


Jab – Acid Spray
Accelgor's odd-looking, puckered lips allow it to eject poison from its mouth, and that's exactly how they're put to use in its standard jab attack. A three-step jab, this attack consists of a quick palm strike with one hand, followed by an identical hit with the other hand, and finally, a spray of acid from Accelgor's mouth. If the jab is inputted with singular presses, the final hit will be an insulting spit of acid toward the opponent's face, which has high hitstun but no real knockback. The strikes in this three-part series of attacks deal 2%, 2%, and 4% damage, respectively, making for a modestly powerful jab, albeit one with no real knockback potential. If the input it held, Accelgor's final hit will become a rapid jab, whereby it continually spits acid from its mouth, dealing moderate hitstun accompanied by 1% damage per hit. Notably, this acid is corrosive enough to break down barriers, and withers shields away like a knife through butter. Shielding opponents beware! It's much easier to punish Accelgor by avoiding his jab and retaliating than by shielding.

Get Up Attack – Struggle Bug
Red with anger, Accelgor quickly rises to its standing position, striking on either side of itself with its arms, and dealing 5% damage with some knockback. Past 100%, the flustered bug performs a rapid handstand kicking maneuver that hits on either side of itself for 7% and higher knockback.

Ledge Attack – Deceptive Blow
Accelgor rolls onto the stage, quickly turning around and sweeping low with its tail/foot, popping the opponent inches into the air, or tripping them occasionally (4%). Past 100%, the Pokémon rolls onto the stage again, this time hitting forcefully with an extended palm, striking the opponent in the back (8%). Unlike other ledge attacks, Accelgor's work best when the foe is behind it rather than in front of it, connecting correctly against opponents who get too close to the ledge, rather than those who respect Accelgor's space. Place a spike a short distance from the ledge, perhaps, to see how your opponent behaves.

Dash Attack – Flying Foot
As Accelgor is technically airborne while dashing, it performs a “dash” attack by flipping itself around so that its singular, gastropod “foot” is facing forward while boosting a short distance. Holding itself this way causes it to deliver a flying kick to anyone it runs into, dealing mild diagonal knockback and 6% damage. There's a bit of endlag after this move ends, as Accelgor lands on its side, halting its momentum. The move comes out quickly but it still rather telegraphed, so it's not the best move to throw around often, and is best reserved for hard reads or when you know it will hit.

Down Tilt – Snail Slide
Leaning bent backward, low to the ground almost to the point of laying on its back, Accelgor slides forward a short distance, generally comparable to Mega Man's down tilt. Sliding into an opponent pops them weakly into the air and behind Accelgor, allowing the ninja to make a risky but sneaky escape from close combat. This weaker attack deals just 5% damage, but can be useful as a mobility option, especially in escape situations, as previously mentioned.

Forward Tilt – Swift Shot
Accelgor expertly swipes its arm backhanded from its chest as if throwing kunai, instead sending out a collection of small, weak stars of light a short distance in front of itself. Extending ¾ of a Battlefield platform in front of Accelgor, this mid-range projectile attack is relatively fast to come out, so it can be a decent surprise attack from time to time. Knockback is nearly nonexistant, but it can weakly whittle down shields and harass opponents, flinching them and buying Accelgor enough time to either retreat or move in; the maximum damage output is 10%.

Up Tilt – Dual Whip
Accelgor looked upward and raises both arms to whip with extended membranous whips from each limb. A two-hit attack with four hitboxes, Accelgor whips upward for the first strike (4%), then crosses its arms to whip them into a knot for a second hit (5%). The first hit is a weak flincher that usually links well into the second, which launches upward, and is a weak kill option for finishing off stubborn survivors around 200%. The whips themselves give the attack quite some range for a normal tilt attack, reaching just below the top Battlefield platform.


Neutral Aerial – Snail Spiral
Accelgor presses its hands together and closes its eyes in concentration as it horizontally spins twice, in a manner similar to Marth's Nair. The scarf around Accelgor's neck extends slightly, whipping opponents who get too close. With horizontal range slightly outclassing Marth's Nair, it's Accelgor's go-to “get off me” option in the air, smacking opponents for mild knockback comparable to Villager's Nair and 8% damage. The second spin has a different hitbox at the end of the animation that sourspots for negligible knockback and 5% damage, so a little precision is required to make the most of the move. Landing lag is mild, but not ignorable.

Up Aerial – Ninja Flip
Displaying expert acrobatic skill, Accelgor performs an aerial backflip, hitting with its foot and dealing 7% with low diagonal knockback. The animation is your archetypical flip kick up aerial, similar to Mario or Pac-Man, but with a bit of tokusatsu flair as Accelgor raises its arms over its head, striking a pose. The entire animation is incredibly quick, easily able to fit two into a shorthop. The attack also has low landing lag, making it quite a spammable technique. Its low knockback is offset by its ability to chain together into itself multiple times, though some accuracy is required due to its short range.

Forward Aerial – Swift Slice
Accelgor quickly chops downward with one arm. This crafty ninja strike comes in two flavors to mix things up against your opponents. A light input will cause Accelgor to send out a short-range disjointed series of small, flinching hitboxes in the form of tiny Swift stars. The range is slightly longer than that of Mega Man's Fair, and the move is a great harassment option out of a shorthop, especially while retreating. When all hits connect, you can expect to deal 11% damage. A “smashed” input, on the other hand, replaces the stream of stardust with one single, large Swift star, which Accelgor grips and slices with like a blade. This deals a more solid, meaty hit of an impressive 14%, as well as knockback reminiscent of Sheik's Fair, but with a more downward trajectory. This version of the move has paltry range, unfortunately, and comes out and ends so quickly that precise timing is needed to avoid whiffing and getting punished. Both versions of this move have moderate landing lag, but Accelgor's fall and jump speed still allow it to throw these out alongside shorthops rather quickly.

Downward Aerial – Thousand Strikes
Accelgor rapidly jabs below itself, alternating arms. These lightning fast punches trap opponents, in the same vein of Dairs as Yoshi and Peach. Delivering blows so fast that only motion blurs can be seen at normal game speed, Accelgor gives its opponent up to 16% damage. If the final hit lands, the opponent is lightly meteor smashed (if aerial) or put into prone (if standing), allowing for some interesting scenarios to unfold. If Accelgor fails to deal the finishing blow, the opponent suffers only mild flinching and is put at a frame advantage, leaving Accelgor vulnerable to counterattack. Out of all of Accelgor's aerials, this attack has the highest landing lag, but it's not exactly bad in that regard.

Backward Aerial – Spiral Kick
Accelgor positions itself so that it's horizontal in the air while spinning, delivering a multihit spin kick to foes behind itself. Similar in animation to Greninja's or Sheik's Up Aerials, only in a sideways position, the attack links together many small hits before releasing the opponent outward. Enemies take a maximum of 10% from this attack. The total knockback is rather weak, so it's not a great off-stage finisher, but if positioned correctly, multiple instances of this move can gimp opponents. Quite fast to execute, Accelgor can throw this move out while approaching, jumping, retreating, or just about whenever it wants, but beware the landing lag on this attack, which is the second highest of Accelgor's aerials.



Grab
In a short-ranged grab, Accelgor grabs with a lightning-fast, motion-blurred extension of one arm, like a warrior in training attempting to catch a fly in midflight. Staring coldly at the opponent with that odd expression it has, it delivers a painful upward jab to the abdomen with its other arm. A mid-speed grab attack, it deals 2% per hit, so it's usually a better option to just toss the opponent before they break out of your grip.

...Or it would be, except for Sticky Hold. Accelgor's iron-tight grip is not limited to simply the items that it grabs; it applies to its opponents as well. Players grabbed by Accelgor will find it 1.5x harder than normal to break out of its grasp, which allows the Pokémon to fit in an extra grab attack or two to rack up some more damage before disposing of its captive.

Down Throw – Swift Execution
Accelgor forcefully tosses the opponent to the ground, hops over the opponent's prone body, and tosses a rapid volley of small Swift stars at them, each hit dealing flinch frames and 1% damage, for a total of 10% overall. Accelgor lands on the other side of the opponent. The opponent is left in prone after this throw ends, forcing them to make a decision in how they will respond.

Back Throw – Water Shuriken
Showing up Greninja at its own game, Accelgor makes use of the Water Shuriken technique that it can also learn. With a backward swing of the arm, Accelgor tosses the opponent 75° into the air behind itself (5% damage). Without even looking back, it tosses a single, small Water Shuriken at the opponent (4% damage), and this can actually be aimed slightly within the range of about 15 degrees, allowing a smart reader to lay the pain on an opponent who tries to DI out of hitstun at low percents. If the shuriken connects, which it usually will unless another opponent attacks the target or Accelgor is interrupted, the target is actually lightly bounced back toward Accelgor, usually ending up in the air a few feet above the Pokémon. Hint: Try to get a follow-up off of this, obviously.

Forward Throw – Pressure Point
Accelgor rapidly jabs at its opponent at different points on their body, attacking their nervous system to briefly stun them. Opponents are left paralyzed in a manner identical to Zero Suit's stun gun or Pac-Man's bell, and will be stunned longer the more damage they've accumulated. While paralyzed, opponents cannot be regrabbed. This “throw” deals 8% damage with no knockback to speak of.

Up Throw – Whiplash
Using motion blur to near-instantly wrap the opponent in a coat of its membrane, Accelgor tosses the opponent upward while they're tied to a leash. Accelgor always tosses the opponent the same distance of 1.5 Batlefield platforms, but unlike other throws, the player can input a secondary direction on the joystick to have Accelgor throw them at any angle between 45° and 135°. At the extent of the throw, Accelgor yanks back on the membranous leash, causing the foe to slam back into the ground beside it, instantly tearing their own membrane coat apart and bouncing them off of the ground, possibly for a follow-up. Opponents can be tossed through a jump-through platform, but when yanked back, will be slammed into the platform instead of returning to Accelgor, allowing the player to get a little tricky with how they use this move. The opponent is dealt 10% damage. Overall, the entire process for this attack is about 80 frames.


Double Team Split Strike


Accelgor employs two different Pokémon techniques for its Final Smash. To activate the attack, the opponent(s) must be within a short distance of Accelgor, who will cast out a glowing pulse of light to ensnare the foe(s). Once the opponent is locked into place, Accelgor glows, using the move Guard Split to average its own defenses with that of its victim(s). Since Accelgor's defenses are so low, the enemy becomes lightweight. Then, the camera zooms in on Accelgor, whose eye glints, and then immediately splits into 6 of itself using Double Team. The illusory copies then begin dashing at the trapped enemies one at a time, slicing through them with ninja-like strikes that deal 10% damage each, for 50% total. The original Accelgor delivers the final blow, dealing 20% damage, with a concentrated strike from a single arm, sending the opponent(s) flying off-stage, and likely to their doom.


Now that we've gone over each individual move, we can discuss some of the more advanced applications of those moves.

One of Accelgor's moveset cornerstones are its spikes, which, like any item, can be played around with in a number of ways. Instead of just picking them up and repeatedly throwing them at your opponent, try Z-dropping them. Most characters with item-based moves, like Link, Peach, and Mega Man, make usage of Z-dropping to great effect. Z-dropping a spike is not only a very fast and unexpected move out of a shorthop, footstool, or shield jump, but the great hit stun it provides opens up a gateway for any number of follow-ups, leading into combos or even a repeating cycle of footstools and Z-drops.

Accelgor's Membrane Chain is a great utility move for snaring opponents from afar, but did you know that it can be platform canceled? Short-hop into or drop through a platform while this move comes out to cancel it early. This allows Accelgor to cast its thread quickly without suffering from the consequence of high cooldown should it miss. Accelgor can act out of a platform-canceled Membrane Chain almost instantly, making the move far less commital. However, the full length of the membrane won't come out when the move is canceled, so keep that in mind.

Accelgor can perform a Spike-Canceled Up Throw using careful positioning. Aiming an opponent into a spike resting on a platform is a great way to build some damage, and if the platform is nearby, you can even follow-up on the hitstun, because an opponent tossed into a spike is instantly freed from the membrane cloak. This breaks the thread as well, canceling Accelgor's Uthrow animation entirely. This move will be canceled whether the opponent hits a spike on their way outward or inward, allowing this somewhat lengthy throw to be sped up considerably. While you won't get the 10% damage from the throw and will have to settle for 5% from a spike, the high flinch effect provided by spikes can allow you to follow up for potentially even more damaging blows.

One of Accelgor's best kill moves, despite being a weak Smash overall, is its Fsmash, U-turn, which, while relatively safe, also has the dishonor of being one of its most telegraphed moves. Like Diddy Kong's infamous glide tossed banana into Fsmash finish, however, Accelgor can mitigate this somewhat. Glide-tossing a spike has enough reliable stun to almost guarantee that your Fsmash will go off successfully, so keep that in mind if you find yourself fruitlessly fishing for kills.

Accelgor is pretty good at keeping strings going. Some makeshift combos include:
  • Bthrow (land shuriken) → Utilt → jump → Uair, Uair, Uair, etc.
  • Uthrow (direct into spike) → short shop Fair → Dtilt → (at lower percents) approaching Bair
  • Short hop Nair (land) → Dtilt → pivot Membrane Chain




Where do we begin to break down Accelgor? As a ninja, it's a master of trickery and deception. The key objective is to keep pressure on the opponent and ensure that they keep second-guessing themselves, always forcing them to worry about stepping out of line, making the wrong move, or attacking at the wrong time. Accelgor relies on blazing speed and perfect maneuverability to completely overwhelm its opponents. A well-honed Accelgor player should be able to make full use of speed and control to be anywhere on-screen that they need to be at the drop of a hat. Accelgor has no shortage of ways to approach, chase, or retreat, with an excellent short hop aerial game, evasive maneuvers such as Down Tilt and even Up Special to fool it its foes into hopelessly chasing it around the map. Even DI'ing opponents have Accelgor's sheer speed to fear, as the shinobi snail has plenty of ways to maneuver around a foe trying to escape its strings of attacks. Accelgor's raw pressure, when applied correctly, makes it very difficult for even skilled players to stay on their toes and think ahead to avoid eating a series of hits.

Accelgor is designed to shut down many of the overcentralizing strengths of Smash 4's powerful shields and grab punishes. Accelgor's Spikes afford great stage control, at the cost of making the arena a bit more dangerous and difficult to navigate for Accelgor as well. The great flinching capabilities of spikes make navigating the stage a feared task for most players, as a single slip-up could lead to dangerous capitalization on the part of Accelgor. Moves such as Ftilt, Jab, Fair, and Usmash bully opponents who don't respect Accelgor's space, pressuring them near spikes and giving them scant room to breathe. Such moves, Spikes included, will also condition foes into throwing out their shields often to avoid taking avoidable damage, only to be punished with a grab or hard read. As a stealthy infiltrator, Accelgor thrives on reading shields and rolls, and has a clear disrespect for shields. While its Dsmash has trouble covering its side, Bug Buzz punishes rollers like no one's business, completely ignoring shields, and Fsmash allows Accelgor to keep up the pressure without fear of being shield-grabbed. Opponents who pick up on these tricks may learn to stop shielding and instead approach Accelgor with short-hopped aerials, dash attacks, or pivoted ground attacks, to which Accelgor may respond with a coy Dsmash to catch them off guard yet again, or respond by jumping out of shield with a Z-dropped spike, never letting the opponent become securely confident in any of their options. Spikes are Accelgor's key tool, and its best close-quarters options are enabled through the use of them as a holdable item, always a reliable tactic thanks to Sticky Hold. Contrarily, without a spike, many of Accelgor's low-knockback, short-ranged close combat options are punishable and weak, which gives it the disadvantage at taking on stronger characters at close-range, specifically struggling with the likes of Mario, Captain Falcon, and Link.

Accelgor generally excels at bringing its opponent nearer to it, or bringing itself nearer to its opponent. While it can close distances and even create space well, it struggles with launching and finishing opponents. Many of its attacks that send opponents away, such as Membrane Chain, Up Throw, and Back Throw, are just as capable of bringing them back closer to Accelgor. Many attacks of this type are designed to put the enemy wherever Accelgor wants them. From that point, it's as simple as navigating Accelgor to that position for a follow-up. Dair and Down Throw force the opponent into positions where they must choose a way to get up, often leaving them little place to go with spikes lying around. They'll often be forced to take the hit from a spike, or simply use their get-up attack, and a smart Accelgor will know how limited these options are and punish accordingly. Membrane Chain is another cornerstone in Accelgor's playstyle, being a lengthy command grab that, like many of Accelgor's other moves, punishes shielders and makes a mockery of the very concept of shielding. Accelgor can approach or retreat while throwing out Membrane Chain when it's platform canceled, but must understand its length in order to not leave itself vulnerable under normal circumstances. Up close, the mid-ranged attack is liable to whiff, guaranteeing the opponent a punish, and from too far a distance, Accelgor is left open for a rushdown; like Bug Buzz, the Membrane Chain will often require a hard read to land and avoid being punished. Membrane Chain is an excellent way to increase the application of Accelgor's spikes, as it can tip the chain with the barbed weapon and open up longer-ranged hitstun options, all without ditching the item in question, as it would with a throw. Membrane Chain can also bring spikes straight to Accelgor's hands, allowing it to pick up its treasured items without having to get too close to risk taking damage from them. A hard read to snag opponents with this versatile special move can reset a combo chain on a fleeing opponent or even secure a kill, as the outward input on this move leads to one of Accelgor's strongest kill options.

While Accelgor has great strengths and a toolshed of options for mixups and general scenarios, it's not without weaknesses. As a fighter of extremes – extreme speed, extreme pressure, extremely light weight – it has both hard strengths and hard weaknesses. Its light weight keeps it from surviving for very long if it finds itself hit by a strong enough move, a major problem for a character with an easily outranged and outprioritized Dair. Because it tends to die early, Accelgor isn't very effective at taking advantage of rage, which can be frustrating for the little bug that already struggles to KO. If you play your cards right, you can net your earliest kills through actions such as getting a Dair meteor smash (best in conjunction with a footstool) or by stage-spiking with Bair. Returning to the stage can sometimes be difficult, especially when knocked at a low trajectory. Accelgor will often be sent flying far, and while its jumps are excellent, it falls quickly, and doesn't have the longest-ranging recovery move out there. Luckily, it can augment this somewhat thanks to its ability to wall-jump.

Accelgor is determined to demonstrate its well-honed ninja techniques in the Smash Bros. arena. A mix-up magician with a great combo, punish, and anti-defensive game, Accelgor forces opponents to adapt to a playstyle that most Smash 4 characters are uncomfortable with. As the millionth ninja character in MYM, you basically know the drill by now. Overwhelm your enemies with disorienting speed and keep them under your constant control. Never let your target out of your sights until the deed is done. Prospective Smashers looking to play as Accelgor, come out of your shells and show everyone what it means to be insane in the membrane.


Taunts
  • Up Taunt – Accelgor utters its own name as it performs a backflip, lands on its “foot”, and strikes a pose with one arm raised.
  • Side Taunt – Closing its eyes and holding its hands together, Accelgor creates illusory copies of itself by rapidly shifting back and forth.
  • Down Taunt – Accelgor sternly glares forward while brandishing an extension of membrane at its side, hitting the ground with a cracking whip sound.

Results Screen
  • Victory 1 – Accelgor rapidly tosses gleaming Swift stars in various directions, then dynamically crosses its arms while facing the camera as the announcer calls its name.
  • Victory 2 – Accelgor simply stands still as an unmoving rock, eyes scowling at the camera as its scarf flows dynamically.
  • Victory 3 – Accelgor, in a blur, rushes on-screen and stops dead-center. With its arms crossed, it turns its head slightly, saying “Accel...Gor!” as it insultingly spits a drop of acid at the ground.
  • Loss – Rather than clap, as most characters do, Accelgor stands, motionless, with its back toward the camera, head slightly turned to view the victor out of the corner of its eye with spite.

Battle Entrance – Accelgor drops down from a classic-style trade cable, as featured during Pokémon trades.

Boxing Ring TitleMach-Speed Mollusk

Kirby Hat – Kirby receives a hat that resembles Accelgor's motocross-like helmet, and gains the ability to use Spikes in the same manner as Accelgor.

Trophies
  • Accelgor
The Shell Out Pokémon, Accelgor is the evolved form of Shelmet. When Karrablast stole its shell, Accelgor took up a swift fighting style. It fights with the speed and skill of a ninja, which sometimes puts it at odds with the brutish and defensive Escavalier. Maybe the two can sort out their differences one day?
[DS: Pokémon Black and Pokémon White (3/2011)]
[DS: Pokémon Black 2 and Pokémon White 2 (10/12)]
  • Accelgor (alt.)
Accelgor's Down Special Bug Buzz has limited range, but completely ignores shields. If you find your opponent shielding often, try using this move to put an end to their shenanigans. Watch out for attacks that can power through your cover, though!
[DS: Pokémon Black and Pokémon White (3/2011)]
[DS: Pokémon Black 2 and Pokémon White 2 (10/12)]
  • Double Team Split Strike
This wordy ninja technique is Accelgor's Final Smash, which sees the Pokémon first lower the target's knockback resistance with Guard Split before using Double Team to copy itself several times over, and begin striking from various angles. The final hit is delivered by the original Accelgor, and will likely seal a KO for your hard work as the target is sent flying. Try using your Membrane Chain to snag opponents trying to avoid your attack.
Whoa, that's a lot of effort you must have put into that. Be warned that many people may need to put even more effort into reading the whole thing xD
I'll read all of it later. But I would suggest not to put quite as much detail in every single attack. My brain has a good chance to explode while I'm reading it!
 

MasterWarlord

Smash Champion
Joined
Aug 24, 2008
Messages
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Crocodilopolis/White King’s Paradise
Whoa, that's a lot of effort you must have put into that. Be warned that many people may need to put even more effort into reading the whole thing xD
I'll read all of it later. But I would suggest not to put quite as much detail in every single attack. My brain has a good chance to explode while I'm reading it!
A lot of us have been doing this for quite some time and put a lot of effort into making our movesets be highly unique in all of their individual attacks, and try to more greatly visualize them in the game. Considering how long some of us have been at this (The entirety of the current leadership has been in MYM for multiple years), we've been around the block and seen a lot of the more basic concepts done many times before. While there is plenty of taste in more simplistic movesets (One of our ultimate goals is attempting to merge functionality and creativity), even then we still like to provide enough detail to fully picture them in the game and talk about what makes their playstyle different from other characters.

To put things in context, some of the walls of text you see can be the product of months of work. I think the longest moveset posted in this particular contest is Chou Chou Infinite or Kel'Thuzad (Unsure due to extra non moveset content in both), both of which come in at over 15,000 words. While obviously not everything we make that big takes that long, to make something in a quick span of time generally requires some concentrated work sessions. BridgeswithTurtles was probably slaving over Accelgor up there for several hours to make something with that kind of effort in a single day.

If you don't have the time to read all of the movesets posted, there's nothing wrong with that, you're among a fairly large group of active posters in the thread. You can come in and read movesets from authors you like or characters that appeal to you, while posting works of your own. The main thing is that if you don't have the time or will to read the majority of movesets in the thread, we would ask that you don't vote in the top 50 at the end of the contest, considering you wouldn't have given many of the potential movesets a proper chance.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 22, 2015
Messages
557
Location
Wokingham
A lot of us have been doing this for quite some time and put a lot of effort into making our movesets be highly unique in all of their individual attacks, and try to more greatly visualize them in the game. Considering how long some of us have been at this (The entirety of the current leadership has been in MYM for multiple years), we've been around the block and seen a lot of the more basic concepts done many times before. While there is plenty of taste in more simplistic movesets (One of our ultimate goals is attempting to merge functionality and creativity), even then we still like to provide enough detail to fully picture them in the game and talk about what makes their playstyle different from other characters.

To put things in context, some of the walls of text you see can be the product of months of work. I think the longest moveset posted in this particular contest is Chou Chou Infinite or Kel'Thuzad (Unsure due to extra non moveset content in both), both of which come in at over 15,000 words. While obviously not everything we make that big takes that long, to make something in a quick span of time generally requires some concentrated work sessions. BridgeswithTurtles was probably slaving over Accelgor up there for several hours to make something with that kind of effort in a single day.

If you don't have the time to read all of the movesets posted, there's nothing wrong with that, you're among a fairly large group of active posters in the thread. You can come in and read movesets from authors you like or characters that appeal to you, while posting works of your own. The main thing is that if you don't have the time or will to read the majority of movesets in the thread, we would ask that you don't vote in the top 50 at the end of the contest, considering you wouldn't have given many of the potential movesets a proper chance.
Good point. I don't think that I would want to read a moveset with 15,000 words, but I will definitely read new ones that look good. And could you give me some feedback on my Roy moveset?
 
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The Make Your Move Rooligan Society
[collapse=Roy]Roy shows that you have an understanding of attack purposes (up special) and an emphasis on making attack animations unique, which is really good since it'd be boring if say Wario's Ftilt and Fsmash looked the same. That being said, Roy does borrow quite heavily from his FE smash counterparts, and that means he doesn't actually do anything unique for the most part. How does he play? How do his moves come together in the end and how are you supposed to use them?

You may omit detail so people can get through your set quickly, which is fair enough from a casual perspective since longer works can take over half an hour to read, but even % or a simple little attack description can make a world of difference in how much one enjoys your set. Also, no need to be shy with those collapse tags; let your set loose for the world to see! You don't have to be like everyone else, but know that you don't have to worry about compressing your sets just because people might not read them if they were long. With that, hopefully I helped just a little bit, and if you have any questions then don't hesitate to ask us.[/collapse]
 

Slavic

homura on the outside, madoka on the inside
Premium
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Jun 5, 2013
Messages
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taco bell, probably

“Yar! You’ll make a tasty treat!”
Clawgrip (Clawglip in some versions) is an antagonistic crustacean who served as a boss in Super Mario Bros. 2, where he fought Mario and co., attempting to crush them with a barrage of boulders. Clawgrip’s only appearances have been in Super Mario Bros. 2 and its remakes and ports, and only appears as a boss once for World 5, unlike Birdo, Mouser, and Tryclyde, who are all fought at least twice. As many people know, Super Mario Bros. 2 is an English version of the Japanese game Doki Doki Panic, but with Mario and his friends as the playable cast. What many people don’t know, however, is that Clawgrip was not in Doki Doki Panic at all. Instead, Clawgrip’s fight was originally a third Mouser fight, but was taken out in the English version as he was considered too difficult a boss. Because of this, Clawgrip had the fortune to be created for Super Mario Bros. 2, when he could have easily been an earlier boss repeated. This makes Clawgrip the only enemy added to Super Mario Bros. 2 that was not originally in Doki Doki Panic. This title is threatened by Robobirdo, who was added to the Gameboy Advance remake of Super Mario Bros. 2, meaning it also was not in Doki Doki Panic. Clawgrip also made an appearance in the Super Mario Bros. Super Show, shown to be heavily affiliated with pirates. The cruel crustacean’s final appearance has been in volume 8 of Super Mario-kun, the official Mario comic series, where he terrorized Mario who ultimately defeated him with a boulder and then a rocket. While Clawgrip’s only battle strategy is to lob chunks of earth at opponents, he has demonstrated other abilities, such as the production of bubbles similar to his lord Wart. There have been other crabs in Mario games, such as Yoshi’s Island and Mario Galaxy who can lend their powers to the king of crabs, and it can be assumed that Clawgrip has the traits and mannerisms of ordinary crabs as well. This allows the crabby crook to have an entire moveset for himself, bringing him to fight some of the universe’s greatest combatants.

Clawgrip's boss battle in SMB2 can be seen here.

Entrance - A Sidestepper from Mario Bros. walks on the screen. The crab is then engulfed in a spray of bubbles, which dissipate and reveal that the crab has become Clawgrip. Clawgrip rotates one claw around as he releases a hearty laugh, prepared for battle.
Boxing Ring Title - King of Crustaceans
U-Taunt - Clawgrip holds a single claw forward, snapping it once, as if performing the come-over-here motion with his crabby appendage. Clawgrip shouts out in a pirate-y accent during this, taunting the opponent to ‘Come fight me, then!’
S-Taunt - Clawgrip faces the camera and lifts his claws up on either side, similar to a generic crab stance. He then performs a comical crabwalk, a few steps to his left followed by a few to his right.
D-Taunt - Clawgrip pulls out three small rocks. The crab then throws them into the air, juggling them for a moment before they all fall to the ground. Clawgrip punctuates this with a disheartened ‘Yar...’ before returning to the fight. During this taunt, a jaunty pirate jingle plays on a faint accordian somewhere.
Victory Pose A - Clawgrip is shown building a wall out of boulders. As he places the last rock on the wall, the whole thing collapses. Clawgrip becomes visibly angry, picking the boulders up and hurling them off the screen, seething red with anger.
Victory Pose B - Clawgrip sits atop a pile of boulders, a true ‘king of the rock’. At the base of the rocks, several Sidesteppers are shown to be carrying various golden treasures and locked chests. Clawgrip roars out with a pirate’s fervor, ‘Take it all, boys! Yar!’ (Note: After winning a Coin Battle, this pose has a 100% chance of appearing.)
Victory Pose C - A few large bubbles pass by on the screen, carrying boulders, Sidesteppers, Bob-ombs, and other general flotsam and jetsam. A moment later, a larger bubble flies onto the screen, containing a gleeful Clawgrip.
Losing Pose - Clawgrip is seen somewhat slumped on the ground, his mouth frothing with great bubbly wrath. However, the crab is a good sport, and taps his claws together in what some could consider a clapping animation.
Victory Theme - The Super Mario Bros. 2 Fanfare (Reorchestrated)
Character Theme - Super Mario Bros. 2 Boss Theme Remix
Home Stage - World 5

Palette Swaps
01 - Original Colors
02 - Colors of a Blue Sidestepper
03 - Colors of a Purple Sidestepper
04 - Colors of Birdo
05 - Colors of Triclyde
06 - Colors of Mouser
Alt. - Clawgrip’s Pirate Outfit from the Super Mario Bros. Super Show.

Animations
Neutral - Clawgrip stands on all his legs, hoisted above the ground. His legs are relatively spaced apart and his claws are held idly in front of his body, slowly snapping throughout the match.
Idle - Clawgrip brings his claws up and peforms a quick jig, waving his claws back and forth as if showing off unseen biceps. Clawgrip does this twice before putting his claws back down.
Walk - Clawgrip’s legs are the only difference between his neutral and walking animations. While walking, the crab’s legs move similar to how a real crab moves.
Run - Clawgrip does his walking animation like before. However, his legs move farther with each stride, and this causes Clawgrip to bounce up and down a little.
Dash - Clawgrip’s legs fold up flat against his shell. The crab drops to the ground and grinds along the stage, leaving sparks behind himself. Similar to Bowser’s dash animation from Brawl.
Jump - Clawgrip’s knees buckle slightly, causing him to lower closer to the ground by a hair. His legs then straighten up all the way, launching the crab upwards into the air before returning to their natural leggy position.
Double Jump - Clawgrip’s knees buckle again, and, similar to his regular jump, straighten out to lift Clawgrip higher into the air. However, Clawgrip’s legs then pull against his shell and the crab performs an aerial flip before returning to his normal aerial stance.
Sleeping - Clawgrip’s legs sprawl out, removing all the support to his shell. As such, Clawgrip flops to the ground, sleeping on his carapace covered belly.
Crouch - Clawgrip bends at all his knees, bringing his height way down. Clawgrip’s underside nearly reaches the ground during this.
Crawl - Clawgrip creeps along, sticking his legs out slowly and pulling his shell along with them.

Clawgrip is built like your standard Mario boss archetype; slow, heavy, and a walking powerhouse. However, Clawgrip’s build differs in that he is a crab, unlike the many bipedal or quadrupedal bosses from Mario games. This lowers the crab’s size significantly, coming up shorter than the likes of Bowser and Ganondorf. While humbling to some, the proud crab uses his slightly lowered height to his advantage, able to avoid some of the taller attacks that plague lesser villains. Clawgrip is in no hurry to get anywhere, but should he need to make a rapid movement his dash allows him to book it. The air is not kind to the crab, and he will come back to Earth as fast as he can, lest he flounder amongst the clouds and combo-heavy aerial fighters. Clawgrip may have oddly distributed stats without any real focus, but he is an excellent combatant regardless.

Weight - 8
Size - 7
Jump Height - 3
Double Jump Height - 4
Air Speed - 4
Fall Speed - 8
Walk Speed - 4
Dash Speed - 7
Traction - 8


Neutral Special - Bubble Breath (5%)
Clawgrip holds his claws out of his way as he faces forward. His mouth chatters and begins to foam wildly. In a moment, a bubble forms at his mandibles, transparent with a blue outline. The bubble grows even larger, reaching its maximum size a little larger than Kirby. This bubble looks kind of delicate, doesn’t it? Well… it is! This bubble is very fragile, and should Clawgrip, an opponent, or any outside force deal any kind of damage to the bubble, it will pop! When the bubble pops, it deals around 5% damage to any opponent in the immediate vicinity, in a flimsy, filmy pseudoexplosion. What purpose does this bubble have? It can serve as a weak, slow moving projectile, as it separates from Clawgrip’s mouth once it has fully formed around Mario’s walk speed. The trajectory of the bubble can be influenced up or down during the startup animation of the move, allowing him to cause bubbles to lift up or down. This bubble travels in a wave away from Clawgrip, popping once struck, if it strikes a surface, or after it has traveled two Battlefield Platforms away from its creator.

More important, however, is the bubble’s ability to encapsulate objects and even opponents. Using this move in front of an item, object, or opponent will cause Clawgrip to inflate the bubble around them. Once the entity in question has been fully engulfed, they are sent on their soapy way. While from the outside the bubbles are incredibly easy to pop, opponents stuck on the inside have a more difficult time escaping. The bubbles can withstand 10% damage a la grab struggle before bursting, and opponents who are inside the bubble are guaranteed to take damage from the popping of the bubble, whether it be from time, outside forces, or from struggling. A final, somewhat odd feature of the bubbles is the ability to catch items that Clawgrip throws at them. This includes everything, ranging from held items like the Home Run Bat to explosives to items like barrels and crates. Should an item be thrown at an already occupied bubble, it will instead pop, dropping both its contents and the thrown object. The versatility of this mechanic cannot be understated; between damaging and carrying opponents, the ability to carry explosives towards the enemy, and the fire-and-forget nature bubbles, Clawgrip has access to an excellent projectile that can mix up the battle.

Side Special - Grip Claw (10%)
Clawgrip’s name is subverted, and in response he lunges forward with a single claw stretched in front of himself. Clawgrip rushes ahead only a short distance, comparable to the Koopa Claw from Melee in range. Clawgrip’s claw is open during this animation. If Clawgrip strikes an opponent, his claw clamps closed, dealing weak damage to the opponent and placing them in a special grab. In this grab, Clawgrip can walk back and forth, but the only input which affects opponents is the Special input. This allows Clawgrip to throw opponents ahead of himself. This throw, like the grab, is special, and provides a set trajectory and knockback, greatly limiting the killing potential of this move. Thrown opponents are sent upwards in an arc, two Stage Builder Blocks in horizontal distance as well. After the peak of the throw, the opponent is free to jump or attack. In addition to opponents, larger objects, like crates and barrels, can be picked up using this move as well. This move, though it may not appear it, is one of Clawgrip’s most important moves for setting up the stage and damaging opponents.

Up Special - Bubble Lift (5%)
Clawgrip’s mouth begins to foam once more, as it did during his Neutral Special. Clawgrip leaps up into the air, spewing a bubble under himself. This bubble functions identically to his Neutral Special, with the ability to engulf opponents and objects. However, rather than drifting forward, the bubble will lift upwards the distance of two Battlefield Platforms slowly. This bubble is special in that Clawgrip can stand on the bubble, which will lift him upwards. At the peak of the bubble’s path, or once struck by an opponent, the bubble pops, dealing no damage to Clawgrip but 5% to opponents and hitstun. After this, Clawgrip falls down, though not helpless; Clawgrip cannot use this move multiple times in the air, however. Once the balloon pops, any object or opponent in the bubble falls downward freely.

Down Special - Boulder Bash (9%)
Clawgrip lifts a claw up in the air, brandishing it as crabs often do. Clawgrip then drops his claw downward like a hammer, bashing opponents for a chunk of damage and decent knockback, KOing around 145%. Opponents stuck between the claw and the ground have their knockback dealt horizontally, while opponents struck by the rest of the claw get knocked diagonally instead. When used in the air, opponents struck at the end of the attack are meteor smashed downward. When used on the ground, this move has a second effect. Directly in front of Clawgrip, after slamming the ground, a boulder flies out of the ground from the impact, about the size of Kirby. This boulder serves as a strong projectile, dealing up to 8% damage to opponents struck by it. The boulder also acts like Stone Kirby should an opponent be trapped under the rock; the boulder travels very low, however, and likely will only do this to prone opponents. This boulder KOs at 145% upon hitting opponents. After appearing, the boulder remains on the stage and acts like a wall and platform for all fighters, and can be destroyed after receiving 20% damage.

This boulder is pivotal to Clawgrip’s moveset, as his other moves are all manipulative of the environment, and this naturally includes his boulders. Clawgrip can have a maximum of five boulders on the screen at once, and it tends to be in the crab’s best interest to leave some behind instead of using them immediately. Now, how can Clawgrip actually use the boulders? They are too heavy to be picked up like a regular item by anyone, although Clawgrip’s Grip Claw allows him to lift them with ease. From here, he can hurl the boulder forward as he would with an opponent, and fighters hit by a boulder in this way are damaged as if struck by the boulder appearing. Hurling the boulders also allows him to move them around easier, juggling them across the stage. The boulders fly forward and upwards two Stage Builder Blocks, reaching a peak and continuing down to the ground after two more blocks of distance. These boulders can be carried inside of Clawgrip’s bubbles as well, either by forming around the rocks or the boulders being thrown into the bubble. When the bubble pops, the boulder is dropped below like a bomb, striking opponents for damage and knockback. Should a boulder be inside of a bubble that is lifting Clawgrip upwards, Clawgrip can quickly jumps off the boulder to reset his jumps, though he only resets his Special upon retouching the stage or being hit. This makes recovery much safer for Clawgrip, as opponents who wish to pop his bubble risk being crushed by a rock. These boulders make Clawgrip’s entire moveset much more hazardous, allowing him to send rocks all over the stage.


Jab - Crabhammer (4%)
Clawgrip holds his claw out in front of himself and it grows to comically large proportions. After a moment, the claw begins spinning slowly around in circles. Opponents struck by this claw take damage and a good deal of knockback for a jab, pushing opponents away from Clawgrip. This is an infinite jab, allowing Clawgrip to spin his claw as much as he needs. Once the jab ends, the crab pauses as his claw shrinks back to normal. While this move is powerful for being a jab, it has a lot of starting and ending lag for what it is, meaning it can be pragmatic to rely on.

Forward Tilt - Pincer Attack (6%)
Clawgrip reaches forward with both of his claws open, and they promptly snap closed one after the other. Each snap deals around 6% damage. The first snap does very little knockback, simply pushing opponents forward a bit. The second snap does more knockback after a slight delay, and launches opponents at an upward diagonal. This move will KO opponents starting at 160%. Like his jab, this move has a bit of startup lag that telegraphs the move.

Up Tilt - Scissor Shockwave (7%)
Clawgrip holds his claw up towards the sky, and it remains there open for a moment. The claw suddenly snaps shut with great force, damaging opponents and launching them upwards. This move is capable of KOing at 165%. This move also creates a shockwave that projects outward from the claw which has a maximum diameter of one Stage Builder Block. This shockwave deals no damage but instead pushes opponents away in the direction of the pulse. If the shockwave hits one of Clawgrip’s bubbles, the bubble will have its trajectory moved in the direction of the pulse, allowing the crab to control where his bubbles travel.

Down Tilt - Crush Claw (9%)
Clawgrip faces the camera and holds both his claws upwards, high in the air. He then drops both of them on either side of himself. Opponents struck by the claw’s arc going downwards take a chunk of damage, 9% for both claws, and aerial opponents are meteor smashed. Grounded opponents who are struck anywhere except the bottom of the claws are launched outward diagonally, KOing around 145%. Opponents who are caught between the ground and the claw take damage and are pitfalled, allowing Clawgrip to follow up with moves like his Bubble Breath or Boulder Bash.

Dash - Crab Roll (4%)
As Clawgrip slides forward on his shell, he lifts himself up even further. After positioning himself on the very center of his shell, Clawgrip rotates around fast like a top with his legs and claws outstretched. Clawgrip travels forward about half a Battlefield Platform while performing this attack before winding down to a stop. Opponents struck by the spiraling crab take damage and are knocked forward slightly, allowing Clawgrip to combo opponents. At the end of the attack, the move deals more knockback than during the spiraling part, capable of KOing at 155% and higher.

Ledge Attack - Lifting Snip (7%)
Clawgrip holds onto the ledge with one claw, using it to propel himself upwards. Once on the stage again, Clawgrip holds his unused claw forward open, snapping it closed with force. Opponents struck by the claw take some damage and are thrown backwards, capable of KOing at 165%+.

Ledge Attack (100%+) - Curling Carapace (3%)
Clawgrip lifts himself slowly back onto the stage. Once he has returned to the stage, Clawgrip pulls his claws and legs against his shell, similar to his dash attack. Clawgrip then spins slowly along the stage the distance of two thirds a Battlefield Platform, dealing weak damage. While not a strong move, this gains Clawgrip a good chunk of distance after saving himself.

Neutral Aerial - Seafoam Assault (5%)
Clawgrip holds his claws away from battle as his mandibles begin to chatter. They froth up and create a small spray of bubbles ahead of Clawgrip. Opponents struck by this foam take damage and are pushed back a little bit. If Clawgrip hits a grounded opponent with this move, the slippery nature of the bubbles will cause them to trip. An additional effect of this move is that it will not break Clawgrip’s bubbles; instead, using this move on a bubble will reinforce it, meaning the bubble will float further an even farther distance, having its total distance traveled raised by a factor of 1.5, assuming it is not popped. The bubble also has its health reset at this point, meaning trapped opponents have to deal more damage to escape from the bubble.

Forward Aerial - Bubble Buster (7%)
Clawgrip spreads his mandibles and they begin to foam. A moment later, a small, silvery bubble launches from his mouth. Unlike his main bubble, this bubble travels forward fast, dealing damage to any opponent struck by it. This move also pushes Clawgrip backwards a short bit, and can be thought of as analogous to the Villager’s Forward Aerial. The main function of this move is not to damage opponents from a distance but to quickly pop his main bubbles quickly, without having to step into the fray.

Up Aerial - Arc de Crab (11%)
Clawgrip swings one claw in an arc above his head in midair. A fairly basic attack, Clawgrip’s claw makes a large hitbox that knocks opponents upwards while damaging them. Clawgrip can KO opponents starting at 155%.

Back Aerial - Backstroke (12%)
Clawgrip holds both his claws above his head. The claws increase in size slightly and Clawgrip swings them backwards in a downward arc with much force. Opponents struck by the claw take damage and are knocked back at a diagonal, capable of KOing at 160%. Opponents who are struck at the very end of the arc are meteor smashed instead, launched straight downward with a lot of power.

Down Aerial - Crab Legs (4%)
Clawgrip stretches his legs out under him, giving this attack decent range. Clawgrip then rapidly stabs with all his legs several times, dealing 4% damage each hit. At the end of the move, Clawgrip thrusts all of his legs down at the same time, creating a single powerful hitbox that deals more damage (6%) and can meteor smash opponents struck by it. This move is better for comboing opponents on the ground as they won’t get pushed away from the attack, although it is also a good anti-air move should someone be giving Clawgrip trouble.


Forward Smash - Sidestepper (11-18%)
Clawgrip lifts one claw into the air, not to attack but to cast an order. With a hearty ‘Yarr!’, Clawgrip points forward. A Sidestepper, the crab enemy from the classic Mario Bros., appears in front of Clawgrip and the attack animation begins to charge. As the attack charges, the Sidestepper changes appearance to indicate the strength, changing in color from red to blue to purple. In between these colors, the Sidestepper will appear angry before switching to a new shade, giving it six distinct levels of power (Red, Red Angry, Blue, Blue Angry, Purple, Purple Angry). When the attack is released, the Sidestepper scuttles forward a few steps in front of Clawgrip and then a few back, snapping its claws the entire time. The speed of the attack and the knockback done by the Sidestepper is dictated by the color of the crab, with purple moving the fastest. The red Sidestepper KOs around 165%, the blue at 145%, and the purple crab KOs starting at 125%. The expression of the Sidestepper determines its damage neutral Sidesteppers of all colors deal 11%, and angry Sidesteppers deal 18%.

The other effect of the Sidestepper, and this is true with all of Clawgrip’s smashes, is the ability to be encapsulated by any of Clawgrip’s empty bubbles, should they run into one. In the case of the Sidestepper, when inside a bubble it will increase the speed of said bubble, allowing the crab to travel longer distances at a fast rate. When the bubble pops, the Sidestepper falls to the ground, dealing weak damage to opponents who are struck by it. As soon as the crab hits the ground, it charges forward a few steps, as if it was just summoned by Clawgrip. However, the crab will not make a return trip, disappearing after it has traveled a few steps.

Up Smash - Fighter Fly (10-16%)
With a pirate-y ‘Go get ‘em!’ Clawgrip lifts his claw in the air, pointing straight up. Above him, a Fighter Fly, another enemy from the classic Mario Bros., appears, charging up the attack. Similar to the Sidestepper smash, the color of the Fighter Fly affects its properties. While there is no angry Fighter Fly, the fly changes color from its default black to green to purple. Each different color of the fly affects its damage and range. When released, the Fighter Fly lifts its arms in the air, rapidly flitting its wings in a blur. The Fighter Fly flies straight upwards, hitting foes and dealing vertical knockback that doesn’t vary with the charge of the attack, KOing at 150%. While normal, the Fighter Fly will buzz upwards half a Stage Builder Block, dealing 10% damage to opponents it strikes. A green Fighter Fly travels a whole Stage Builder Block and deals 13% when it makes contact, and the purple one flies a Stage Builder Block and a half for 16% damage.

Like the Sidestepper, the Fighter Fly can be sent into any bubble, though it’s easiest to put the fly in a vertically moving bubble, like those from Clawgrip’s Bubble Lift. Once inside a bubble, the Fighter Fly vigorously flaps its wings, increasing the speed of the bubble greatly. The bubble will not travel farther; if the bubble should run into an opponent and pop, it will do 10% damage instead of 5% due to the increased speed. Once the bubble pops, the Fighter Fly will fly out with its arms outstretched, traveling a fourth of a Stage Builder Block before disappearing. As a note for all of Clawgrip’s smashes, he is incapable of moving normally while performing them. However, should one of his minions enter a bubble, Clawgrip is free to move once more. Clawgrip can also only have one of each minion in a bubble at a time. If there is already a Fighter Fly traveling on its own in a bubble, attempting to put another one in a different bubble will just cause the bubble to pop, even if empty.

Down Smash - Spiny Egg (13-21%)
Clawgrip lifts both claws upwards and a red, thorny ball appears in his hands, a Spiny Egg. During this time, the move charges and the Spiny Egg changes color from red to green to blue. Once released, Clawgrip yells out in a nautical accent ‘Yer dead weight!’ and promptly drops the Spiny Egg. The move is a little laggy, similar to Villager’s forward smash, and it is Clawgrip’s best smash move for killing, dealing a lot of damage and knockback. Similar to Clawgrip’s other Smashes, the color of the shell affects the abilities of the move. A default red Spiny Egg deals 13% damage and throws opponents backwards, KOing at 150%. Green shells deal 17% damage and KO starting at 130%, and the blue shell will deal 21% damage and KO at 110%+. Unlike the other smashes, this move has diminutive range, as the Spiny Egg will only strike right in front of Clawgrip, unable to travel anywhere.

Unable to travel, however, unless placed in a bubble! Unlike the other smash moves, the bubble is not sped up with a Spiny Egg inside, instead slowing down and actually descending slowly as it moves forward. Additionally, the Spiny Egg turns into a full Spiny, capable of walking. Unfortunately for the turtle, it has nowhere to walk as it is stuck inside the bubble. Though the bubble moves slower, it will still travel as far as it normally would, which allows this move to interrupt an opponent’s momentum for longer. When popped, the Spiny will fall out of the bubble as expected. Should the bubble still be airborne, the Spiny reverts back to a Spiny Egg, falling and working simply as an extension of the smash move, disappearing upon contact with the ground. If the bubble pops after it has reached the ground, the Spiny will walk along the ground for a distance, very slowly, dealing the same damage as the smash but with less knockback. After traveling around one Stage Builder Block, the Spiny will disappear. The color of the Spiny dictate how fast the Spiny moves



or ‘Crab Game’
Grab - Grip Grab (0%)
Clawgrip points a single claw out in front of himself and enlarges itself a bit. An opponent struck by the claw are grabbed. While this grab has a decently large hitbox, it has a lot of startup and ending lag for a grab, punishing Clawgrip for being too ambitious with his grabs. After an opponent has been snared, the claw shrinks to normal, pulling the opponent closer.

Pummel - Vicegrip (3%)
Clawgrip uses the claw that holds the opponent as a vicegrip, crushing them for weak damage.

Forward Throw - Lobster Lob (12%)
The claw which is currently holding the opponent grows larger and begins to spin around in vertically aligned circles. After a few moments of wind-up, Clawgrip opens his claw, hurling the opponent forward a bit in a manner visually similar to his Grip Claw move. Opponents can be KO’d starting at 165%. However, should Clawgrip throw the opponent and they come in contact with an unoccupied bubble, they will be absorbed into the filmy surface.

Up Throw - Pirate’s Juggle (11%)
Clawgrip faces the camera and throws the opponent in the air a very short distance. During this time, Clawgrip throws a few small rocks in the air as well. Clawgrip juggles the opponent and rocks for a few moments, racking up 11% damage to the opponent before they are thrown upwards, KOing at 150%. Opponents besides the one currently being thrown can be struck by the juggled rocks, taking 2% damage and some hitstun. Similar to the Forward Throw, opponents who touch a bubble after being thrown are taken into the bubble’s interior. While juggling the opponent and rocks, a jaunty pirate jingle plays on an unknown accordion faintly.

Back Throw - Crustacean Circuit (11%)
Clawgrip faces the camera and the claw with a snared opponent grows in size, similar to the forward throw. However, Clawgrip’s other claw also grows in size, and both claws begin spinning around in circles. Every time the claws rotate, the opponent is grabbed by the opposite claw, which happens four times before they are thrown behind Clawgrip. This throw can KO at 160% and higher, and opponents can be thrown into bubbles, of course.

Down Throw - Avalanche (14%)
Clawgrip takes the opponent in his claw and pins them against the ground, immobilizing them. Clawgrip uses his free claw to take out a boulder, which he lifts up in the air. Clawgrip brings the boulder down with ferocity, using it as a hammer against the opponent. When struck, the opponent takes a good chunk of damage, and some horizontal knockback. While this move deals the best damage out of all of Clawgrip’s throws, it also has the weakest killing potential, starting to KO at 170%. Similar to his up throw, this move can damage other opponents as well, should they be struck by the rock as it travels downwards. Unlike his other throws, opponents will not enter bubbles if they hit them.


Crab Battle
Clawgrip puts a claw to his mandibles and manages a whistle (how does he do it??). A pirate ship appears from the right side of the screen and Clawgrip is teleported to the wheel of the ship. The only part of the ship seen is the front half. Clawgrip is immobile during this Final Smash, but also invincible. A pile of cannonballs appear next to Clawgrip, which can be thrown by pressing any attack input, essentially a farther reaching version of the Grip Claw throw. However, the trajectory of these cannonballs can be aimed, and each one deals 20% damage to opponents and can KO at 125%. Clawgrip can throw five of these cannonballs during this Final Smash. During this move, a swarm of Sidesteppers, Spinies, and Fighter Flies exist the ship, causing mayhem and attacking opponents in the same manner as they do in Mario Bros. This move ends automatically after eight seconds, causing the ship to retreat and Clawgrip to teleport back. All of his minions disappear after the ship leaves as well. This Final Smash will also end early if Clawgrip throws all five of his cannonballs.

The king of crabs the ocean across, the stone-throwing Subconian crustacean, the big jumbo shrimp himself, Clawgrip likes to play in a true evil boss method; rather than getting close and dirty, he prefers to take control of the field from a distance, throwing out bubbles, boulders, and all sorts of baddies to do his bidding. Like a true pirate and villain, of course, he is capable of close combat, and uses his claws and carapace to overpower opponents and pressure them away, allowing him to continue his distanced assault. Clawgrip’s weakness is his air game, and he can be outranged by projectile characters who can eliminate the bubbles before they become a problem. Much of the early battle with Clawgrip consists of him throwing boulders around the stage, not just to fight but to set the field up for late game attacks. Once there are boulders scattered around the stage, Clawgrip truly becomes deadly, able to run across the stage and pelt opponents from anywhere he wants. His bubbles and smashes make approaches difficult, as he can easily prevent characters like Little Mac from getting too close with projectile pressure. All is not buttery gold for the crab king, however, as his rock heavy shell and easy to stop recovery can lead him to gravity’s grave off stage. The best way to counter Clawgrip is to target bubbles as soon as they appear, which cripples Clawgrip’s excellent boulders and smashes, forcing him to rely on close range combat where his laggy moves can result in being easily outsped. The cons and pros, as they tend to do, balance each other out, and Clawgrip can be a nautical nuisance to team up with any truly diabolical player.

Palutena’s Guidance
Pit - W-wow! That’s one big crab!
Viridi - Yes, Pit, his name is Clawgrip! As you might expect from his name, watch out for those killer claws.
Palutena - Not just that, Pit, but watch out for the bubbles he spits out at you, you wouldn’t want to get trapped in them.
Viridi - And his minions! They can come out of nowhere and charge at you!
Palutena - And of course you have his boulders to watch out for, they’re heavier than they look!
Viridi - And-!
Pit - Yeah, that’s great and all, but I have one question.
Palutena - Yes, Pit?
Pit - How do you think he tastes with butter on the side?
Viridi - …

Trophies
Fighter Trophy
Clawgrip
(The trophy displays Clawgrip brandishing both his claws in front of himself, his mouth with traces of bubble on it)
Clawgrip was the boss of World 5 in Super Mario Bros. 2. The crab caused trouble for Mario and friends by hurling rocks at the crew. When the rocks were thrown back, however, the crab king was ultimately defeated and the heroes continued onward. This crab brings with him a barrage of bubbles, boulders, and baddies to battle with.

Fighter Trophy (alt.)
Clawgrip
(On the 3DS, a blue Clawgrip is seen with a bubble protruding from his mandibles, caressed by his claws. On the WiiU, the pirate dressed Clawgrip is seen holding a Spiny Egg over his head)
Clawgrip likes to control the battlefield using his bubbles, which can hold virtually anything and carry them around. The bubbles are easy to pop but deal damage to opponents to close. Clawgrip also comes packing minions like the Spiny, whose egg can be dropped into a bubble to travel to opponents.
Final Smash
Crab Battle
(The trophy shows the front of a pirate ship, covered with enemies and Clawgrip at the helm)
When Clawgrip grabs the Smash Ball, he calls his pirate squad to do his bidding for him. The Fighter Flies are the hardest to watch out for, as they leap around and are difficult to avoid. Clawgrip isn’t useless during this move, either, throwing out a volley of cannonballs to attack opponents with.

---

I don’t know why I chose to make a moveset for Clawgrip (the only other one I could find is here, and it’s, well, interesting). Clawgrip was my favorite boss from Super Mario Bros. 2, and I just got it in my head to make a moveset for him. Given how little there was to work with for Clawgrip, I thought making this moveset was a lot of fun. The boulder moves are self-explanatory, as it is how Clawgrip actually fights in the game. The idea of using Mario Bros. enemies for smashes came from his entrance in the remake of Super Mario Bros. 2 as an altered Sidestepper, so I figured he had a pirate crew of these enemies. The bubbles were a bit of a stretch, but I got the idea of an obscure game similar to Fossil Fighters, where you got attacked by a bubble breathing crab while looking for fossils. I think I characterized him pretty well, and this is one of my personal favorite sets I’ve made so far! Now to get caught up on comments...
 
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Whoa, that's a lot of effort you must have put into that. Be warned that many people may need to put even more effort into reading the whole thing xD
I'll read all of it later. But I would suggest not to put quite as much detail in every single attack. My brain has a good chance to explode while I'm reading it!
I'm glad my moveset looks appealing to you, and I look forward to any feedback you may be able to give once you've read it.

Actually, Accelgor is one of my less detailed movesets, as I often go into very lengthy explanations to meticulously detail each and every move. Right now, I'm trying to cut down on wordiness and make my moveset easier to read, and Accelgor is an attempt at that. There are much lengthier movesets throughout MYM's history (mine actually tend to be quite shorter than most veterans'), and in this very contest, which I'd recommend you spend some time reading if you have the time, as hypocritical as I may be saying that. Like MasterWarlord said, a lot of posters in this thread are MYM veterans and have been doing movesets for years; compared to most, I'm a relative newbie. Lengthy, detailed movesets are just sort of the norm for participants as they get bored of ultra-simple playstyles and wish to try more outlandish and complex ideas. I've been making movesets for the better part of a decade, but until I joined MYM, they were often very short and undetailed. While I enjoyed writing those movesets, they definitely weren't as satisfying as what I would later go on to create. Many of us like to envision what our character would truly feel like if they were actually in the game, whether we express that through conventions such as highly detailed break-downs of each and every move; describing each and every animation the character takes; or even coming up with extraneous data unrelated to the character's playstyle itself, such as taunts or trophy descriptions. Personally, I like to write my movesets as if I were a programmer pitching an idea to the development team. I wouldn't just give them a vague description of each move, but rather, I'd describe an entire playstyle I'd like to see integrated into the game; exactly how we'd make the character work, and why it would be a worthwhile new project to invest in.

No worries if you or anyone else doesn't get around to reading it, as I don't mind. I mostly make movesets just to flex my creative muscles, and I post them here in case anyone else would want to see them. I really don't mind much if my movesets go ignored, as I see any readers as being a perk, rather than something I expect from anyone.

PS: I second what Katapultar said. Don't feel obligated to format your movesets into a spoiler tag. You can if you want, but hardly anybody will mind if you don't, and in fact, I'd encourage you to display your movesets just as everyone else does. It makes it easier to notice it while scrolling down a page.
 
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[collapse=Clawgrip]Clawgrip immediately stands out the moment you look upon his set, and the contents don't disappoint - he is undoubtedly your breakthrough set.

Where to start? The Specials are all pretty great and feel unique, especially the bubble Neutral Special. What's more, your standard attacks are better than ever before, more fleshed out and actually capitalizing on your base concept through the occasional interaction. It reminds me of old bubble-based sets back in MYM13 like Bubbleman EXE which have aged badly, and it's refreshing to have an interaction-based set for once. Bubbles are simple enough that Clawgrip can get good mileage out of them if he stays close to them, like placing a minion in one or even just having it pop near a foe so you can capitalize on their hitstun with something like a Dash Attack.

The moves were easy to understand for the most part, but the Side Special left me confused about how the opponent actually comes back down once thrown up and then the part about traveling 4 SBBs on flat stages and then falling endlessly. Do they have to button-mash to escape once they start falling when initially thrown upwards? Also, no specific size is given for the boulder nor a trajectory, but I assume it travels on a very low angle given what you imply. These details are probably common sense to those who have seen the Clawgrip boss fight, but I have not and there is no link to the fight from what I can see in the set.

As far as nitpicks regarding the actual set, I somewhat feel that the boulders can potentially hurt your bubbles by blocking them off in certain situations, but it's not really a big deal since it comes down to stage control and you can easily reposition the boulders. Also, might I suggest that you make the bubbles be able to curve upwards or downwards by holding the control stick up or down during the start-up lag of the Neutral Special? This would make them a good deal more versatile, and really it would help if you could elevate a NSpec bubble so it would be easier to utilize boulder and U-Smash interactions with it so you don't just have to use the Up Special or U-tilt interaction. The bubble could also provide stage control by blocking off the air while your boulders block off the ground, or something...and also let your bubble float over your boulders.

Overall, Clawgrip is a very cool set coming from you, and really shows how far you've come in such a short amount of time. You've become a force in your own way now, and it makes me excited as to what you might have in store for us in the future, as well as the possibility that you might one day make a truly great set. Keep up the good work![/collapse]
 

Munomario777

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BAYMAX
"Hello. I am Baymax, your personal healthcare companion."
Hailing from the city of San Fransokyo, Baymax is the revolutionary new healthcare robot designed by Hadashi Hamada to help the sick and injured around the world. While big marshmellow nurse robots aren't awfully common when it comes to fighting, Baymax has some upgrades that make him well equipped to take on the world of Smash! As always, this moveset is custom built from the ground up for Smash 4 for balance and the like. With the introductions out of the way, let's delve right into this set!

STATS

Weight: Yoshi (despite his large size, Baymax is lightweight due to his inflatable structure)
Size: Bowser
Ground Speed: Ike
Jump Height: Olimar
Air Speed: Ike
Fall Speed: Jigglypuff
Stance: For the crouch, Baymax deflates flat to the ground.

UNIQUE MECHANICS

Baymax's main mechanic is his companion from Big Hero 6, that companion being Hero Hamada!

Hiro rides on Baymax's back, and serves as the brains of the duo. Technically, the player is actually controlling Hiro, and he tells Baymax what to do via his neurotransmitter (or occasionally shouting out the move's name). While this may seem like a purely aesthetic detail at first, it is actually a vital part of Baymax's playstyle, and his core weakness. See, if Hiro is hit with a powerful launching attack, he will be sent flying off of Baymax, and the player will lose control of Baymax! Baymax will then wander around the stage aimlessly, and he will still take percentage and knockback when attacked. He will still try to recover with his double jump and midair movement, but he won't use his recovery moves, so it's vital to get back on Baymax before he gets KO'd! (Hiro can re-mount Baymax by simply jumping on top of him.) Hiro does have his own moveset for when they're separated, but it's much weaker, simpler, and more limited:

Neutral Special: Nanobot Toss
Damage: 5%
Hiro tosses a ball of his Nanobots (tiny robots that can clump together to form bigger things) forward in an arc to damage opponents. Lacks severely in the knockback department.

Side Special: Nanobot Chain
Damage: 5%
Hiro extends a chain made of his Nanobots about one Battlefield platform long and cracks it like a whip to damage opponents. Lacks severely in the knockback department, but functions as a tether recovery.

Up Special: Jetpack
Damage: 0%
Hiro extends a small jetpack from his suit to ascend about one Battlefield platform. Does not leave Hiro in helpless, but can't be used again without touching the ground.

Down Special: Nanobot Pillar
Damage: 5%
Hiro summons a pillar of his Nanobots beneath him to raise him up into the air a distance about the same as his height. Damages opponents, but lacks severely in the knockback department.

Tilts/Aerials: Nanobot Fist
Damage: 5%
For all of his tilts and aerials, Hiro creates a fist made of his Nanobots to punch in any direction.

Hiro's recovery is actually pretty good, since three of his four Specials can be used in succession to recover, but he does not have any other moves besides the above attacks. His stats are similar to those of Mario. If Baymax gets KO'd without Hiro on top of him, the player will lose a stock/point/etc. and Baymax will respawn, but Hiro will remain on the battlefield, detached from Baymax. If Hiro gets KO'd while separated from Baymax, the reverse will happen (and the player will still lose a stock/point/etc.).

Additionally, while Baymax is normally in his regular form, many of his attacks have him partially transform into his 2.0 form:

When performing an attack that uses this feature (will be noted on a per-attack basis), that part of Baymax's body will gain the 2.0 armor for a second (i.e. for a punch, Baymax gains the armor on his fist). Aside from giving his punches more "oomph" than squishy Baymax could regularly achieve, these parts of his body are also invincible during the attacks. This enables Baymax to be a viable fighter while still allowing the player to control the "marshmallow" form of Baymax (because really, who doesn't want to do that?).

SPECIALS

Neutral Special: Rocket Fist
Damage: 17%
Baymax holds his fist in front of him while it gains the 2.0 armor and fires forward via small hidden rockets, detaching from his arm and shooting ahead at moderate speed (about Mario's dash speed) to damage opponents. Deals good damage and knockback, KOing at around 130%, but Baymax can only have two out at any given time (seeing as how he only has two hands), and using this attack renders Baymax unable to perform punching attacks (this goes for all attacks that use his rocket fists). When the hand hits a solid surface, an opponent, or strong projectiles, it will explode, and Baymax will grow it back. This attack is a bit laggy, due to the rockets taking a moment to activate.

Side Special: Inflate Roll
Damage: 10%
Baymax inflates into a round, puffy ball and rolls along the ground at Captain Falcon's dash speed (or up to Sonic's if he's rolling down a steep enough incline), while Hiro runs on top to control the direction. Baymax can ram into opponents to deal 10% of damage and good knockback, KOing at around 130%. Has a bit of lag due to the inflation and deflation, and won't move sideways much in midair (but will deal a powerful meteor smash).

Up Special: Wings
Damage: 5%
Baymax assumes a "Superman" pose and gains the wings from his 2.0 armor, using the thrusters to recover to the stage. Carries Baymax about three times his own height through the air, and can be aimed similarly to Lucario's Extreme Speed. If Baymax collides with an opponent, he will deal 5% of damage and moderate knockback. Baymax is put into helpless after the flight is finished.

Down Special: Scan
Damage: 0%
Baymax leans forward as his head gains the helmet from his 2.0 armor and uses his medical scanner to scan the closest opponent (or opponents) in front of him (up to three Baymax widths away). Once the scan is complete (which takes a second), Baymax has the opponent's medical data in his database. This puts extra data on that opponent's percentage gauge area, including shield recharge, score, stale moves, and more. In addition, Baymax analyzes the opponent's weak spots, making his attacks deal 1.3x their original damage, hitstun, and knockback to that opponent. The effect lasts either for 15 seconds or until Baymax uses the move again (even if he misses).

STANDARD ATTACKS

Jab: Antibacterial Spray
Damage: 3%, 3%, 1% per rapid hit, 3%
Baymax does two weak punches straight forward (without the 2.0 armor) and then holds out his hands, with his palms facing diagonally down and forward. He then activates the antibacterial spray in his hands for the rapid hits, spraying it at a downward angle. The finisher has him do another weak punch to deal moderate knockback.

Forward Tilt: Defibrillators
Damage: 3% pet hit, 5 hits, total of 15%
Baymax says "clear!", rubs his hands together, and holds them straight in front of his body. He then uses the defibrillators in his hands to shock opponents in front of him. Has a bit of start lag (since he has to rub them together before using them), but makes up for it in damage. Deals moderate knockback.

Up Tilt: Flip Kick
Damage: 5%
Hiro holds onto Baymax with his hands and does a flip kick upwards to deal 5% of damage and moderate knockback, while Baymax jumps about one third of a his own height up to extend the attack's range. A nice, quick attack with good range, but lacks in knockback.

Down Tilt: Roundhouse Kick
Damage: 10%
Baymax crouches down, gains the foot from his 2.0 armor, and does a low roundhouse kick. Deals 10% of damage and moderate knockback.

Dash Attack: Belly Flop
Damage: 10%
Baymax does a running belly flop onto the ground to damage opponents and deal moderate knockback, while Hiro flies into the air and lands on Baymax once he gets back on his feet. Has a bit of end lag due to Baymax having to get up after the attack, and opponents can punish Baymax easily by jumping over the attack and hitting Hiro.

Edge Attack: Punch
Damage: 3%
Hiro punches forward while Baymax gets up onto the stage. Deals low damage and flinching, and Baymax is a bit slow and clumsy to get up.

SMASH ATTACKS

Side Smash: Fistbump
Damage: 20%
Hiro jumps off of Baymax's back and steps in front of him, and they do a fistbump (see above), with most of it being during the charging period and the actual bumping of fists (which serves as a punch, and Baymax has the 2.0 hand while punching) and the aftermath thereof being the actual attack. Luckily, Hiro barely gets out of the way of Baymax's fist, which is extremely powerful, dealing heavy damage and knockback (KOing at around 90%), but it has a few downsides: Firstly, the move cannot be used unless it is fully charged. In addition, there is quite a bit of end lag due to the "bah-a-la-la-la". Finally, Hiro is made especially vulnerable due to him being on the ground in front of Baymax (plus, he has to get back on Baymax, which adds a bit of end lag to the attack).

Down Smash: Double Hammer Fist
Damage: 10~18% depending on charge
Baymax crouches, faces the camera, gains the 2.0 armor on both hands, and does a hammer fist punch to either side. Has good range and is rather quick, but can be avoided by crouching since it doesn't make contact with the ground. KOs at around 120% at full charge, and if it hits an opponent over the edge, has a powerful meteor smash.

Up Smash: Upward Rocket Fist
Damage: 10~18% depending on charge
Baymax looks above him and shoots one of his fists (which gains the 2.0 armor) upwards, in a similar fashion to his Neutral Special with similar lag. The fist travels about one Battlefield platform upward before reattaching to Baymax. Deals great damage and can KO at around 100% at full charge.

AERIAL ATTACKS

Neutral Aerial: Knife Hand
Damage: 4~10%
Baymax faces straight forward in midair, and his hands both gain the 2.0 armor. Then he and Hiro both perform a quick double knife hand attack to either side; Baymax attacks in front, while Hiro attacks behind. Baymax deals 10% of damage and moderate knockback, but Hiro only deals 4% of damage and minor knockback.

Up Aerial: Flip Kick
Damage: 5%
Hiro holds onto Baymax with his hands and does a flip kick upwards to deal 5% of damage and moderate knockback. Is very quick, but lacks in the damage and knockback departments.

Down Aerial: Drop Kick
Damage: 15%
Baymax faces the camera, gains the 2.0 armor on his feet, and thrusts them downwards, dealing 10% of damage and a powerful meteor smash. Is a bit slow, but makes up for it in power.

Forward Aerial: Side Kick
Damage: 8%
Baymax faces the camera, gains the 2.0 armor on his leg, and does a side kick in front of himself, dealing 8% of damage and KOing at around 120%. Is rather quick, but the hitbox is a bit small.

Back Aerial: Back Kick
Damage: 10%
Baymax gains the 2.0 armor on his leg and does a back kick behind himself in a similar pose to Donkey Kong's Back Aerial, dealing 10% of damage and KOing at around 110%. Slower than the Forward Aerial.

GRAB GAME

Grab: Megabot
Damage: 0%

Hiro holds out his Megabot (which is small enough to fit in the palm of the hand, despite the name) behind Baymax to grab opponents. Is very quick and has a good range, but requires the target to be behind Baymax, which requires not only getting used to but also exposes Hiro to attacks. Once the opponent is grabbed, the Megabot goes into "angry face" mode:


Pummel: Megaspin
Damage: 1%
The Megabot spins its "arms" around to hit the opponent the opponent, dealing 1% of damage. This pummel is very quick.

Up Throw: Belly Slam
Damage: 12%
Hiro pins the opponent to the ground while Baymax jumps up at a height equal to his full jump and belly slams the opponent, arms and legs outstretched. Deals good damage and good knockback, KOing at around 130%.

Forward Throw: Microbot Toss
Damage: 10%
Hiro summons a giant arm and hand made of Microbots to grab the opponent and fling them forward. Deals good damage and great knockback, KOing at around 100%.

Down Throw: Clear!
Damage: 3% per hit, 5 hits, total of 15%
Hiro pins the opponent on the ground while Baymax rubs his hands together to charge up his built-in defibrillators. Baymax then says "Clear!" and uses them on the opponent's chest (as if they had a heart attack), dealing good damage and weak knockback.

Back Throw: Rocket Fist
Damage: 10%
Baymax gains the 2.0 armor on one of his fists and shoots the opponent at point blank with the rocket fist. This won't explode on contact, however; the fist continues to carry the opponent for about three times Baymax's width with a shaky trajectory at a slight upward angle and then explodes, dealing 10% of damage and great knockback, KOing at around 90% (taking into account the travel distance). Once the fist explodes, Baymax will regenerate it like usual.

MISCELLANEOUS

Final Smash: Baymax 2.0: Rage Edition
Damage: varies

Baymax gains his 2.0 armor on his whole body, which doubles the damage and knockback all of his attacks deal, as well as making him invincible and allowing him to fly forever without going into helpless. This would be all fine and dandy, of course, if it weren't for the fact that Baymax's medicare chip (which also contains his personality and such) falls out, which causes Baymax to go on a destructive rampage! Luckily, Hiro catches the chip, but Baymax throws him off and attacks opponents. The player is now controlling Hiro, who must be careful not to get in the crossfire, since Baymax can now harm him! After fifteen seconds of this, Hiro throws the medicare chip back into Baymax, which causes him to lose his 2.0 armor and turn back to normal, thus ending the Final Smash (Hiro must still remount Baymax, however).

Entrance Animation:

Baymax emerges from his charging box and waves, and then Hiro mounts him.

Up Taunt:
Baymax says, "I know karate," and he enters a fighting stance.
Side Taunt:
Baymax scans Hiro for medical information.
Down Taunt:
Baymax deflates and reinflates.

Losing Animation:
Baymax hugs Hiro and pats his head, as if to say "There, there."
Victory Pose 1:
Baymax 2.0 flies around with Hiro on his back, and the screen freeze frames when they fly by the camera.
Victory Pose 2:
Hiro tinkers with Baymax's armor, but a puff of smoke comes out and Hiro's face becomes cartoonishly exploded-looking.
Victory Pose 3:
Baymax and Hiro do the aforementioned fistbump.

Victory Music: ???

Miscellaneous:
- In the stunned period after his shield is broken, Baymax becomes slightly deflated, and will say one of the following phrases in a woozy voice:
"Low battery..."
"I'm healthcare, your personal Baymax companion."
"WE JUMPED OUT A WINDOW!"
- When Baymax lands a successful meteor smash (and KOs with it), he says "You have fallen."
- When Baymax enters water, he inflates to gain buoyancy.

PLAYSTYLE
Baymax is a strong character with powerful attacks, a good recovery, and lots of options. However, he has one fatal flaw in the fact that he relies entirely on Hiro to function, and is pretty much useless on his own (except for the Final Smash). Thus, Baymax's playstyle revolves around keeping opponents away from his backside and thus his weak spot. If Hiro does get knocked off, remember that Baymax walks very slowly on his own, and use Hiro's Nanobots to fend off opponents on your way back; just be sure to return to Baymax quickly! His Neutral Special is a good projectile that can keep opponents at bay, but limits his close range options. The Side Special is a great way to traverse the stage (especially given Baymax's slow running speed), but leaves Hiro even more open than he normally is! The Up Special is fairly standard as far as recovery moves go and can be aimed to fit the situation at hand, but the Down Special is anything but! While the scanning gives Baymax a great advantage if used properly, it leaves him (and Hiro!) open for a second, making it a very risk-versus-reward move. The tilts are fairly standard, but they're good for up-close, and the smashes have some unique attributes (the Forward Smash leaves Hiro vulnerable, so be careful when using this). The aerials take advantage of Baymax's martial arts upgrades, and the drop kick is a force to be reckoned with! The grab is the epitome of risk versus reward in the moveset, since it requires great skill to use, exposes Baymax's weak spot, and provides powerful throws to boot! The Final Smash is dangerous to everyone on the field, and Hiro must be extremely careful to stay out of Baymax's way! Overall, Baymax is a character who wants to protect Hiro at all costs, whether it be via projectiles, long-range attacks, or speed, and he's ready to take on the world of Smash! As always, feedback is appreciated, and I hope you enjoyed the set! :)

Like what you see? See some more over at my Make Your Move Hub! :D
 
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Slavic

homura on the outside, madoka on the inside
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FLESHY MOVESET TUTORIAL
Since there are a lot of newcomers on Make Your Move now (not that I’m one to really talk), I wanted to try and be productive to help without saying the same thing over different movesets. So I decided to make a tutorial on how to flesh moves out and get the right amount of detail to help make these movesets spectacular. Below I have put a few examples of moves from Smash Bros described by yours truly, each one with two descriptions. The first description is under detailed, exaggeratedly so, but it still describes the attack. The second version goes into the nitty gritty of each move, explaining everything that should be described in an attack. Compare the two and you see that, even though they are the same move, you get a much better idea of how the move works in the second description.


Mario

Neutral Special - Fireball
Mario shoots a red fireball in front of himself. Opponents hit by the fireball are burned and take damage.


Luigi
Neutral Special - Fireball
Luigi shoots a green fireball in front of himself. Opponents hit by the fireball are burned and take damage.

Technically, both these descriptions are accurate; Mario shoots a red fireball, and Luigi shoots a green fireball. The way these moves are described, though, leaves plenty of unanswered questions about damage, movement, appearance, and knockback. It also portrays Mario and Luigi as having identical fireballs. This isn’t all bad, however, as it is a good start to describing the moves. It just needs expanded upon, as illustrated below with the expanded moves.

Mario
Neutral Special - Fireball
Mario takes a step forward and bends at the front knee, putting himself in a quasi-kneeling pose. Mario leans forward on this foot and holds one hand out, palm open. From his hand, a red fireball is launched out. This fireball bounces along the ground, up to three times, before disappearing. These bounces take the fireball almost two and a half Battlefield platforms forward before it dissipates. Should an opponent be struck by a fireball, they receive a burning effect and take 5% damage with some hitstun, though virtually non-existent knockback. When used in the air, the fireball will fall until the ground and bounce two more times, no matter how far it travels. Mario is able to throw two of these fireballs out at a time, with about a half second of lag between them. The fireball spawns with the iconic Fire Mario sound.
Luigi
Neutral Special - Fireball
Luigi twists his body and leans forward on one leg slightly. He holds his hand out, poised as if about to fire a finger pistol. A green fireball leaps from Luigi’s fingers, and it flies straight ahead of Luigi in the air, rather than bouncing in a manner similar to the fireball enemies from Mario Bros.. The fireball rotates in the air as it travels, and travels one and a half Battlefield Platforms forward before disappearing. Opponents struck by this fireball are burned and receive 6% damage, being stunned a bit. Luigi can rapidly create these fireballs with little lag in between, though only two will ever be out at the same time. The fireball spawns with the iconic Fire Luigi sound.

As you can see, the moves are much different, and their unique properties are actually relevant to mention. While the first descriptions were correct, they don’t have nearly as much detail or pertinent information as the updated ones. While it may look daunting to write, moves can be expanded upon fairly quickly by asking yourself simple questions, like I do:

- What does this move look like?
- How does [character] perform this move?
- How much damage does this move do?
- How much knockback does this move do and in what direction?
- How fast is this move performed?
- What is the range on this move?
- What other effects does this move have?
- How does this move work with [character]’s other moves?
- Why is this move important to [character]?

There are other things that can factor into the move, but these are key details to ask yourself and answer in the moveset. It takes a little longer, but the payoff is worth it, as it turns any moveset into something more substantial. Below are more examples of Smash Bros. moves broken down into detail. A good exercise for describing moves is to pull out Smash Bros. and go to training, pick a random character, use any move, and describe it in detail, using the questions above as a template.

- Other examples -

Marth
Forward Tilt
Marth swings his rapier up in an arc in front of himself.

Marth
Forward Tilt
Marth leans forward dramatically, thrusting his rapier forward. Marth then swings it upwards in an arc, just over 90 degrees. The attack is fast, and opponents who are struck take 9% damage and are knocked horizontally away from Marth. This move begins to KO at over 180%. However, should an opponent be struck by the sweetspot of Marth’s rapier, as indicated by a bright blue blur at the tip of the sword, opponents will take 12% damage instead of 9%, and are knocked upwards and outwards. Sweetspotted opponents can be KOd at as low as 125%. When the sweetspot hits, there is a more drastic slashing sound.


Wii Fit Trainer
Up Smash
The Wii Fit Trainer points her arms up and performs the tree position, damaging opponents above her.

Wii Fit Trainer
Up Smash
The Wii Fit Trainer brings her hands together, almost as if praying, and her legs cross at the knees. While charging the move, the Wii Fit Trainer remains bent legged, semi-crouched. Once released, the Wii Fit Trainer stretches upward, both her hands pointed above her head, and she brings her foot against the opposite leg, striking the tree pose. The damage this move’s damage ranges from 15% to 21% at full charge, and launches opponents straight up in the air, able to KO at 95% when the charge is maxed.

I hope this post can help explain how to flesh out moves to some of the newcomers without making it some cryptic puzzle. I know I can be guilty of leaving out important details, so feel free to call me out on being hypocritical. I just want to help! If you have any questions, feel free to ask and I’ll try to answer them to the best of my ability, though the veterans might be better suited to answer them. Hope to continue seeing great new movesets!

---
[collapse=Clawgrip]Clawgrip immediately stands out the moment you look upon his set, and the contents don't disappoint - he is undoubtedly your breakthrough set.

Where to start? The Specials are all pretty great and feel unique, especially the bubble Neutral Special. What's more, your standard attacks are better than ever before, more fleshed out and actually capitalizing on your base concept through the occasional interaction. It reminds me of old bubble-based sets back in MYM13 like Bubbleman EXE which have aged badly, and it's refreshing to have an interaction-based set for once. Bubbles are simple enough that Clawgrip can get good mileage out of them if he stays close to them, like placing a minion in one or even just having it pop near a foe so you can capitalize on their hitstun with something like a Dash Attack.

The moves were easy to understand for the most part, but the Side Special left me confused about how the opponent actually comes back down once thrown up and then the part about traveling 4 SBBs on flat stages and then falling endlessly. Do they have to button-mash to escape once they start falling when initially thrown upwards? Also, no specific size is given for the boulder nor a trajectory, but I assume it travels on a very low angle given what you imply. These details are probably common sense to those who have seen the Clawgrip boss fight, but I have not and there is no link to the fight from what I can see in the set.

As far as nitpicks regarding the actual set, I somewhat feel that the boulders can potentially hurt your bubbles by blocking them off in certain situations, but it's not really a big deal since it comes down to stage control and you can easily reposition the boulders. Also, might I suggest that you make the bubbles be able to curve upwards or downwards by holding the control stick up or down during the start-up lag of the Neutral Special? This would make them a good deal more versatile, and really it would help if you could elevate a NSpec bubble so it would be easier to utilize boulder and U-Smash interactions with it so you don't just have to use the Up Special or U-tilt interaction. The bubble could also provide stage control by blocking off the air while your boulders block off the ground, or something...and also let your bubble float over your boulders.

Overall, Clawgrip is a very cool set coming from you, and really shows how far you've come in such a short amount of time. You've become a force in your own way now, and it makes me excited as to what you might have in store for us in the future, as well as the possibility that you might one day make a truly great set. Keep up the good work![/collapse]
Thank you for the response, Kat! This is some of my proudest work on Make Your Move, so I’m glad people enjoyed it as much as I did. I went through and fixed some of the issues with the Side and Down Special, and I also threw in a clip of the Clawgrip battle in the introduction. I also added the adjustment to the bubbles, because I do think that adds something cool to the set. I’m not terribly concerned about the boulders interfering with the bubbles, since they move slow enough to rearrange the boulders, and it really shouldn’t make too much of an issue to gameplay.
 
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ForwardArrow

Smash Journeyman
Joined
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Messages
431
Clawgrip
I feel some need to comment this set as I have been glancing over your other sets Dr. Slavic, and while I need to read them in detail you actually do feel like you have an awareness of playstyle and half decent concepts. I'm not going to say Clawgrip is revolutionary because its not, but the using the bubbles to create a minefield of aerial boulders and Smash Attack summons is at least somewhat fun to envision, and even in the standards you actually throw in some material to play off them, such as another projectile to pop them from safety or moves that buff them up a bit and move them around. The real highlight for me is just the varied Smash attacks, which all have a bunch of unique properties when in bubbles or coming out of bubbles, and in a trap a lot of newer people fall into, none of them just obsolete the boulders introduced earlier as far as material to place in bubbles.

There are a few problems worth addressing, probably the one that sticks out to me the most just being the Up and Side Specials. The Up Special is literally just the Neutral Special but fired up and usable as a recovery for reasons that aren't clearly shown to the player, and while the boulder application you put in to make it a remotely safe recovery is fun, I still wonder if it could've just been safely combined into the Neutral Special. Side B also feels rather bad, mostly just as a generic super forceful spacer on opponents that ends up simplifying getting your opponent into ideal positions with your bubbles far more than it needs too, and providing an alternative to just carrying around items like a normal character for no adequately explained reason, other than to attempt playstyle relevance beyond that. I know it sounds harsh but neither move has much reason to exist, which is rather egregious on specials. Aside from that the grab game's relevance amounts too "you can throw them into bubbles" which is functional, but it doesn't really expand on his game at all like I'd hope it would, given opponents running into bubbles naturally causes the same effect. Also Down Tilt pitfalling is honestly kind of broken and doesn't contribute to the set in a productive way, arbitrary powerful stuns thrown in at random like that are universally considered a very bad thing nowadays.

I know that last paragraph was rather harsh, but I'm sure you can understand the criticism because you seem to have a pretty solid understanding of playstyle and MYM in general. If you can improve much of this you'll honestly be a very competitive setmaker and I eagerly await what you post next.
 
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[collapse=Roy]Roy shows that you have an understanding of attack purposes (up special) and an emphasis on making attack animations unique, which is really good since it'd be boring if say Wario's Ftilt and Fsmash looked the same. That being said, Roy does borrow quite heavily from his FE smash counterparts, and that means he doesn't actually do anything unique for the most part. How does he play? How do his moves come together in the end and how are you supposed to use them?

You may omit detail so people can get through your set quickly, which is fair enough from a casual perspective since longer works can take over half an hour to read, but even % or a simple little attack description can make a world of difference in how much one enjoys your set. Also, no need to be shy with those collapse tags; let your set loose for the world to see! You don't have to be like everyone else, but know that you don't have to worry about compressing your sets just because people might not read them if they were long. With that, hopefully I helped just a little bit, and if you have any questions then don't hesitate to ask us.[/collapse]
Some of the attack descriptions I ripped off a website describing the moves. The Up Special was one of them as the one in Project M I thought was different to Marth's, and for the Side Special I just took the Up Special and made it into a horizontal recovery move as well.
I may redo the moveset with more detail and in a style like you guys have done it, but right now my back is in pain for reasons that I don't need to describe here :(
I'm also going to do Lucina and Chrom, then I have my own characters that I made up myself which I can make up my own stuff for.
I don't know any strategies that would work when using my Roy set. I suppose I could have described when you should use a move, like with his Up Air which has a small hitbox, and that should be used when your opponent is directly above you, requiring precise timing.
 
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Hey all, figured i'd throw my hat in the ring. This was a moveset I already did, but I figured to use it unedited just as a control group on where I am on the move-set making spectrum.


Tyrantrum
Universe: Pokemon
Game of Origin: Pokemon X/Pokemon Y <3DS, 2013>


Universal Stats:
- Size: Class 10-11 <big as he needs to be in order to be a class higher than Bowser, but not overly gigantic. Basically, as big as he can be without it clearly being silly about how big he is.>
- Weight: 10-11 <135>
- Ground Speed: 3
- Air Speed: 1
- Fall Speed: 11

-Number of successive jumps: 2
-Wall Jump: No
-Crawl: No

Tyrantrum is a huge, aggressive dinosaur of a Pokemon, and his attacks will most perfectly show that. His speed and air options are severely limited outside of techniques, but if he connects an attack, it'll hit like a freight train. He's bigger, meaner, and heavier than Bowser by a good bit, so good luck trying to knock this titan off the stage.

That said, if you DO get him off-stage, may as well consider Tyrantrum KO'd. Not only would his stage recovery be spectacularly horrible even compared to Little Mac's <though his air attacks in themselves aren't weakened like Mac's are>, but most of the moves are as ancient in speed as they are in strength, so you can almost assuredly get a counterattack in before Tyrantrum can land a hit. He also would have his size betray him in the air; His jump height is laughable compared to most characters, and he sinks like, well, a rock if he gets taken off-stage. Grabbing a Metal Box as Tyrantrum would be comparable to a do-or-die strategy in regards to his extra durability vs. the added fall speed.

Moveset:
-Neutral A: Tyrantrum takes a hearty bite out of crime his opponent using his trademark jaw. Only hits once.
-Side Tilt: Tyrantrum flails his arms around to scratch the opponent a few times. Kind of a piddly attack in range, power and utility, but it's his de-facto fastest attack.
-Up Tilt: Tyrantrum takes a chomp straight upward.
-Down Tilt: Tyrantrum stomps a foot straight down for a curbstomp. Can Meteor Smash at higher percentages if used off the ledge.
-Dash Attack:
Tyrantrum does a frontflip and kicks out with both feet, similar to Riptor from Killer Instinct.
-Grab Pummel: Tyrantrum's grab holds opponents in his hands. Pummeling has Tyrantrum crunch down on them with his teeth.
-Forward Throw: Tyrantrum tosses the opponent forward, then headbutts them away.
-Backward Throw: Tyrantrum slams the opponent down on the ground, then kicks them back behind him.
-Up Throw: Tyrantrum grabs the opponent with his teeth and tosses them upward.
-Down Throw: Tyrantrum turns around, slams the opponent down, then gives a powerful curbstomp. Think of it like Chief Thunder's hit-grab in Killer Instinct '13.

-Neutral Aerial: Tyrantrum kicks both feet forward.
-Forward Aerial: Tyrantrum tries to grab the opponent with his arms.poor reach as to be expected, but if he grabs you, he brings you down for a powerful frog splash.
-Backward Aerial: Tyrantrum swings his tail down for a Meteor Smash.
-Up Aerial: Tyrantrum chomps upward.
-Down Aerial: Tyrantrum stops in the air, readies his body and shoots downward with both feet extended. If it connects, opponents will be hit twice; Once for the kick that causes a untechable Meteor Smash, and again when Tyrantrum slams into the ground.

-Side Smash: Tyrantrum swings his tail forward with a golden aura emanating off of it.
-Up Smash: Tyrantrum jumps straight up for a powerful headbutt.
-Down Smash: Tyrantrum slams his foot to the ground, pauses, then stomps again. Only hits in front of you, but the first hit buries opponents <no damage>, while the second hit deals a great deal of damage, and sends opponents flying.

-Neutral Special <Roar>: As Tyrantrum would be so big in the fight, it's just so that most people would try and fight him almost exclusively just for being the elephant-er, dinosaur-in the room.Naturally, he's gonna need a way to get some of that pressure off of him. Roar is a chargeable move that, when unleashed, lets Tyrantrum belt out a ferocious roar, sending out a windbox from around his entire character, the size and power of which can be charged indefinitely. That said, getting any overbearingly-powerful pushback takes an almost comically large charge time, so you should mostly just use it to get others off of you rather than actively going for enough power to KO a person just from Roar.
-Side Special <Rock Slide>: In a slight sendup of Hulk's Gamma Wave/Tsunami in the Marvel vs. Capcom series, Tyrantrum plants his foot inside of the ground, then kicks up, sending a group a stones flying up like a small concrete wave in front of him. Great power if it hits, and each individual sidewalk piece deals damage if hit from close up. That said, the stones count as physical projectiles, so watch out for reflect characters or a Villager. Using this move in the air will have Tyrantrum simply kick forward rather pitifully, but for nothing to come out from it. No damage from the air kick, either.
-Up Special <Ancient Power>: I stone spire made of golden aura erupts from under Tyrantrum, shooting him upward. The move has great upward range, but down right terrible horizontal recovery, similar to a Zelda using Farore's Wind upward.
-Down Special <Endure>: Tyrantrum steels his body for a full second, then is buffed with 1 hit of hyper armor that is a guaranteed flinch nullifier, no matter the opposing attack's damage. However, as Endure can fail after repeated usage, in Smash Bros., the startup window on Tyrantrum's Endure increases by an extra half second after every time he can get a successful hit of armor. If he is hit out of the startup, he is dealt extra knockback, but the startup for Endure resets back to its default. You cannot stack Endure uses to get multiple armors.

-Final Smash <Rock Polish>: Tyrantrum coats his entire body with a golden aura, making him impervious to flinching. His attack speed is also greatly increased, making all attack animations twice as fast, though there is no buff to walk speed, air speed or attack power. However, a Rock Polished Tyrantrum can still receive damage, so your main goal as Tyrantum is to get your strongest attacks out with the attack speed buff, and not worry about any move having snail's-pace animations.

EDIT: I had to edit the ground speed stat. Darn keyboard fingers, heh

EDIT 2: GO HERE for the newest version of this moveset.
 
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Reigaheres

Roses are Blue, Violets are Blue, I'm Blue too
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Hey guys, I'm working in a team to make a fangame and I think that making movesets may halt my work in the game, so I guess I'll stop making mediocre movesets for a good while, or at least update with movesets way less frequently. :(

But I guess making reviews won't take a lot of my time, so I guess I'll still do some comments.

Tyrantrum

Welcome to Make Your Move, TechPowah! Your Tyrantrum moveset seems actually pretty good for a first moveset, barring some major flaws that can simply be editted. What really got my attention is how great you talked about Tyrantrum in the stats section, making us (at least me) have a pretty good sense of how it feels like moving around with Tyrantrum. Some moves in this set are also increadibly creative like the Forward Aerial and the Down Smash, though you seem to be hit or miss with these moves as some are pretty bland and don't have a very indept explination.
You should also add how much % a move deals and the knockback (if it's good, great or not very good), these informations help us understand the utility of a move better and better understand the playstyle.
This is more of a nitpick per-say, but it would be better to read movesets that have moves neatly organised than those that are a cluster of moves together, I mean, which one of these moveset's look better?

This one:

Specials:

Neutral-Special: Soybean Gun
Nano put's her right arm forward and the animation above happens. She can then can fire up to 6 soybean, the first 5 do 2~3% damage with almost no knockback, while the last one does 5~6% and has good knockback, being a bit bigger to distinguish it from others.
(....)


Down-Special: Food Dispense

This move on input has Nano dispense one of many foodstuff that then become an item consumable to her and adversaries. These food items include: (....)


or this one?

Neutral Special <Soybean Gun>:Nano put's her right arm forward and the animation above happens. She can then can fire up to 6 soybean, the first 5 do 2~3% damage with almost no knockback, while the last one does 5~6% and has good knockback, being a bit bigger to distinguish it from others (...)
Down-Special <Food Dispense>: This move on input has Nano dispense one of many foodstuff that then become an item consumable to her and adversaries. These food items include: ....

Obviously the first one looks more appealing and looks less like a cluster of words, so you should adopt that style.
You should also make a Playstyle section, sure, we know Tyrantrum's physics, but how would one generally try to do when playing as him? What moves are the more effective?
Overall, you have very good potential. As for the question as to if you are or aren't on the moveset spectrum you certainly have potential, so you shouldn't give up!

 

Slavic

homura on the outside, madoka on the inside
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SLAVIC'S SMASHING STATEMENTS!
ACCELGOR
Accelgor is one of my favorite Pokemon, so I’m glad to see it getting some love! First things first, making this moveset in one day is inspiring! I’m very impressed, Clawgrip took almost a week to put together (though I kept distracting myself), and it is well thought out for being a day long set. I love the idea of using Sticky Hold as you did, though I feel like Unburden could have been included in some way, just for a bit of fun. The stats all make sense for Accelgor, and fit both the Pokemon and the playstyle. The use of Spikes is pretty cool to see on this set, and the latent damage build up is important to Accelgor who can have trouble KOing opponents otherwise. When I first started reading the Membrane Chain, I was concerned it was just going to be Sheik's Chain Whip, but with a membrane. I like the idea of grabbing items with the membrane too, and I can imagine fun hijinks by using the membrane on its own Spikes. Bug Buzz is a must have on Accelgor’s moveset, and you pulled it off very well. Ignoring shields entirely is an interesting concept, and I don’t think it sounds *too* broken. Double Team is very ninja-like in execution here, and plays some excellent mind games with opponents, as I’m sure you’re aware. With his Standards, none of them stick out as being awkward or awful, and some, like the Jab, are pretty nifty, punishing shield users. Seeing Sticky Hold come back for the grab was unexpected and enjoyable, even if it seems off for a little snail ninja, it is a good reference to the source material. This moveset manages to be a ninja set without being stereotypical as one, using just enough of the Pokemon source material to make a unique fighter.

As for issues with the set, I’m not sure if Accelgor, given its speed and ground control, actually needs the Membrane Chain, as fun as it is, since I feel like it is just as fast as tethering opponents. If I were playing, I would usually just run up to opponents and strike them up close rather than risk missing the membrane chain. It is useful for Accelgor to grab items, of course, but it seems a little unnecessary for Accelgor. The size and number of the spikes concerns me too. I’m fine with having five spikes, but each one being the size of a Freezie is a little excessive, and could be scaled down quite a bit and still be effective. For reference, a Freezie is this large. I honestly think they could be the size of a Smart Bomb and still work fine. As another issue, though more just characterization, I wish Accelgor pulled off a ranged ninja vibe more, rather than martial arts, since it’s second biggest stat is Special Attack. That’s not terribly important, though, as you do pull it off well. I wish you did more with the Standards, possibly revolving around punishing shields to help give Accelgor more thematic moves. Perhaps using Swift to damage shields along with his poison moves, helping the less than physically capable slug deal enough damage to kill. Other than these issues, I think Accelgor is one of my favorites in this contest to read, and you did an excellent job!

BAYMAX AND HIRO
I still haven’t seen Big Hero 6, but I know enough about it to go into this set. The mechanic with Hiro seems a little odd when you first read it, but it actually makes a good enough weakness to balance out a lot of Baymax’s more powerful moves. The Specials have some good things going for them too, I especially enjoy the Rocket Fist. You have definitely learned since Captain Toad, you aren’t just giving Baymax an arbitrary in character weakness without making up for it. The Down Special Medical Scan is actually a really neat idea, and I’m glad you implemented it like you did. I never thought how cool it would be to see all of an opponent’s information, and it’s very in character for Baymax. I’m a little concerned about the time span, but I don’t think a second is terribly ridiculous. This set sticks out amongst many of your others because it is very coherent, with all the moves tying together instead of being a hodgepodge of references, which I have noticed your sets tend to be. I also really enjoy the concept of a backwards grab, it’s so versatile to be able to attack in one direction and grab in another, and it really helps the duo out. As for potential edits, my typical mantra of detailing attacks more applies, though only a few examples stick out as being criminally under detailed. For instance, the fistbump is a nifty move, but you don’t explain how Hiro gets down or in what time span, something rather important for the move. Other examples include the Neutral Air, the Up and Down Throw, and Up Special, though that one just looks like parts of the sentence were deleted. My last issue is with the Final Smash, because twenty seconds is a long time for all of that to happen. All things considered, this is a pretty nifty set from you, and is definitely a good step forward in your movesetting.

TYRANTRUM
Welcome to Make Your Move! For a starter, I will parrot what others have said earlier to Roy in that you do not have to worry about putting movesets in collapse tags, nobody on here minds scrolling through movesets and they do attract more attention if you leave them uncollapsed. Into the moveset itself, you seem to have a pretty good grasp on how to make movesets, especially for a newcomer. I understand you posted this as a sort of background moveset, so you can compare later movesets to it, and I will critique it as such. First off, I actually really enjoy the Specials for what they are. They’re simple, but they add a lot to support his royal highness’ physical movepool. You avoid the infamous ‘Pokemon Complex’ well in this set, creating your own effects for many of the moves. Roar and Endure stand out the most to me, as they are support moves you rarely see on heavy characters. However, you pull it off very well, and they both tackle specific weaknesses which can plague Tyrantrum, with (assumingly) laggy attacks he doesn’t want to be knocked out of and the ability to keep opponents away from his easy-to-strike hitbox.

For recommendations on what to improve for this and future sets, I would first suggest adding more detail to attacks. If you’re unsure on how to do it or what information to include, I’ve added a short tutorial on attack basics a few posts upwards. Reading through that should hopefully help add detail to your attacks, as people want to know more about damage, knockback, lag, and range. Reiga (hope you can still make movesets at least occasionally!) points out a bit of formatting improvements, and in addition I would recommend looking around at old sets and taking note of which ones stand out the most to you, and try and figure out what they do to attract intention. This is definitely a good starting place for a movesetter, and I hope that you continue to improve and make more movesets for the competition!
 

Munomario777

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BAYMAX AND HIRO
I still haven’t seen Big Hero 6, but I know enough about it to go into this set. The mechanic with Hiro seems a little odd when you first read it, but it actually makes a good enough weakness to balance out a lot of Baymax’s more powerful moves. The Specials have some good things going for them too, I especially enjoy the Rocket Fist. You have definitely learned since Captain Toad, you aren’t just giving Baymax an arbitrary in character weakness without making up for it. The Down Special Medical Scan is actually a really neat idea, and I’m glad you implemented it like you did. I never thought how cool it would be to see all of an opponent’s information, and it’s very in character for Baymax. I’m a little concerned about the time span, but I don’t think a second is terribly ridiculous. This set sticks out amongst many of your others because it is very coherent, with all the moves tying together instead of being a hodgepodge of references, which I have noticed your sets tend to be. I also really enjoy the concept of a backwards grab, it’s so versatile to be able to attack in one direction and grab in another, and it really helps the duo out. As for potential edits, my typical mantra of detailing attacks more applies, though only a few examples stick out as being criminally under detailed. For instance, the fistbump is a nifty move, but you don’t explain how Hiro gets down or in what time span, something rather important for the move. Other examples include the Neutral Air, the Up and Down Throw, and Up Special, though that one just looks like parts of the sentence were deleted. My last issue is with the Final Smash, because twenty seconds is a long time for all of that to happen. All things considered, this is a pretty nifty set from you, and is definitely a good step forward in your movesetting.
Thanks for the feedback! :)
  • Big Hero 6: I definitely recommend seeing it; it's a great movie.
  • Hiro: Thanks! Since Baymax isn't designed for combat, he needs someone with a bit more fighting knowledge to guide him, and I think the mechanic works rather well.
  • Rocket Fist: It's one of his signature moves in the movie, and it made sense to include it in the moveset, especially since it has its own unique properties.
  • Scan: Thanks! When making the set, I aimed to have a nice balance of Baymax's medicare abilities and combat abilities, and I think I accomplished that pretty nicely. It would be really interesting if you could actually see that data in the games (perhaps a Special Smash mode?).
  • Coherent: I think Baymax has a really nice flow to him, with a couple of core mechanics that bind his moveset together while still being faithful to the source. I really like how he turned out.
  • Grab: The grab really provides a nice risk-versus-reward element to the set, and really makes it stand out.
  • Detail: True. I'll go through and flesh out some of the descriptions a bit.
  • Final Smash: Good point. I'll perhaps tone down the time limit a bit
  • Conclusion: Thanks! I really like how it turned out, and I'm glad I was able to fit as much of Baymax's personality into the set as I did.
Thanks again for the feedback! :) I'll go through the moveset and flesh out some of the descriptions a bit, as well as tweaking some details here or there.

EDIT: Moveset updated! Check it out and see what you think! :)
 
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Oh man, this is quite a bit of feedback, a little overwhelming, heh. But yes, this is tremendously helpful, i'll see if I can't do something with the layout and descriptions.

.....And also add an Up Special, I just realized I never gave him one. Whoops.

EDIT: I figured i'd ask, what is this "Pokemon Complex"?

EDIT 2: I was working on an Up Special, only to notice that he already had one. Oh well, too late now, this special is more fun anyway. =P
 
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n88_2004

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Every reasonably prolific MYMer is guaranteed to create a Pokémon set at some point.
Actually, I believe the Doctor was referring to good ol' Pokemon Syndrome, which is an age-old MYM term for diagnosing a Pokemon set that doesn't quite make the best use of the Pokemon's learnset. A good definition and example (pulled from this article, which is a bit old, but still worth a perusal for the new guys) is as follows:

What is Pokemon Syndrome?

We’ve had this question asked a myriad times in the past, and I’ve given my answer just as many times, but once more won’t hurt. Pokemon Syndrome is when a moveset doesn’t understand the moves that a Pokemon can do. Or rather, doesn’t understand ‘how‘ the Pokemon uses certain moves, and what those moves say about the Pokemon.

For an example, let’s take good old Arbok. He learns Leer and Glare, both of which are intimidation techniques suitable for a snake to unnerve the foe with. However, do not make the mistake of assuming Arbok uses his eyes for these attacks. That’s not how a cobra would do it, and it’s certainly not how Arbok would do it. The pattern on his hood is clearly a glowering face, and THAT is what the cobra Pokemon intimidates his prey with.

Also note what these attacks say about Arbok. A big running theme for this Pokemon, is intimidation. He scares the foe into immobilization, which gives his venom a chance to work its magic. Leer and Glare both play into this theme. The attacks aren’t just there for gameplay reasons, they help flesh out the characterisation of the Pokemon itself.
 
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Slavic

homura on the outside, madoka on the inside
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Oh man, this is quite a bit of feedback, a little overwhelming, heh. But yes, this is tremendously helpful, i'll see if I can't do something with the layout and descriptions.

.....And also add an Up Special, I just realized I never gave him one. Whoops.

EDIT: I figured i'd ask, what is this "Pokemon Complex"?

EDIT 2: I was working on an Up Special, only to notice that he already had one. Oh well, too late now, this special is more fun anyway. =P
I'm interested in hearing what your other idea of an Up Special was before you saw you had AncientPower. Plus you can incorporate it as a custom move! As for the Pokemon Complex, more specifically, I believe it is in reference to movesets that incorporate material that is out of character for the fighter to use, even if they technically can. This is especially true in Pokemon sets, as Make Your Movers tend to blur the line between what a Pokemon naturally uses and what it actually has. For instance, let's say I'm hypothetically making a moveset for Machamp. Machamp can learn Blizzard, Sheer Cold, Fire Blast, Hyper Beam, Fissure, and several other elemental moves. Yes, Machamp can learn them, but it isn't very characteristic of him, so you have to be careful with which moves you pick. I think this stems from the fact that so many people name every move in the set, including Standards, so it sounds like a nice reference to name them after moves the Pokemon leanrs. This actually limits what can be done, as you start forcing the moves to match the ingame attack, which can feel unnatural. An example of a criminal offense of this is my Magcargo set, which may as well be ripped off of Bulbapedia. You do a good job at avoiding this, though, which is good for a newcomer. The best way to prevent this would be to only look at Level Up and Breeding moves, which are much more natural than tutors or TMs. This can happen in other characters as well, I saw a Megaman.exe set from MYM 9 I think that was guilty of it, but it doesn't appear as much as it does in Pokemon. Hope this helps you understand what I'm talking about!

EDIT - Nate ninja'd me, but he has an excellent point too. Don't feel like you have to perform a move in accordance with the in-game animation, description, or effect if it doesn't fit the character. You actually do a really good job at coming up with creative uses for moves.
 
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Ah, OK then. I actually try and avoid looking at the actual moves while making normals, as I always imagine those as the moves a given character can do naturally as opposed to using the specific powers, especially for Pokemon. The actual moves they can use in Pokemon are reserved for Specials, as those are the ones that actually involve a Pokemon's given special abilities.

Anyway, while i'm re editing the moveset writeup and special move, i'm going ahead and giving Tyrantrum a tiny overhaul on his ideal playstyle. His style is still "top attack power, but slo-mo moves and abysmal recovery", but to a higher extreme; Now, he's being rebranded as a character that will absolutely decimate you with the power of his normals and specials, but his recovery is so bad it makes Little Mac look like Brawl-era Meta Knight, and his moves have such a heaviness to them that it will be a wonder you landed them in the first place. It's not that his aerial normals are bad, it's just that his air mobility and weight are very much so a death sentence the moment you stop having something to land on.
 
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OK, here's my revised Tyrantrum moveset, version 2.0
I'd just edit the old post, but i want it to stay there just so the feedback can still be understandable. That said, I WILL go ahead and edit this one for any other changes.
And so I can post without the spoiler bracket. Exposure, HO! =P

And sorry for what is technically a double-post

Edit 1: Slight damage change on Down Throw, seemed a little too strong.

Tyrantrum
Universe: Pokemon
Game of Origin: Pokemon X/Pokemon Y <3DS, 2013>

Universal Stats:
- Size: 10-11 <big as he needs to be in order to be a class higher than Bowser, but not overly gigantic. Basically, as big as he can be without it clearly being silly about how big he is.>
- Weight: 10-11 <135>
- Ground Speed: 3
- Air Speed: 1
- Fall Speed: 11

-Number of successive jumps: 2
-Wall Jump: No
-Wall Cling: No
-Crawl: No

Tyrantrum is a huge, aggressive dinosaur of a Pokemon, and his attacks will most perfectly show that. His speed and air options are severely limited outside of techniques, but if he connects an attack, it'll hit like a freight train. He's bigger, meaner, and heavier than Bowser by a good margin, so good luck trying to knock this titan off the stage.

That said, if you DO get him off-stage, may as well consider Tyrantrum KO'd. Not only would his stage recovery be spectacularly horrible even compared to Little Mac's <though his air attacks in themselves aren't weakened like Mac's are>, but most of the moves are as ancient in speed as they are in strength, so you can almost assuredly get a counterattack in before Tyrantrum can land a hit. He also would have his size betray him in the air; His jump height is laughable compared to most characters, and he sinks like, well, a rock if he gets taken off-stage. Grabbing a Metal Box as Tyrantrum would be comparable to a do-or-die strategy in regards to his extra durability vs. the added fall speed.

Moveset:
Grounded Normals:
-Neutral Attack: Tyrantrum takes a hearty bite out of his opponent using his trademark jaw. He chomps in front of him, but he lowers his neck slightly to make sure he can get the smaller characters. Only hits once. Does about 7% damage, with minor knockback. Will destroy non-explosive projectiles, but only if it connects with Tyrantrum's mouth. Explosives and items will still connect. Large beam-type projectiles, such as the Daybreak or the vertical beams from the Three Sacred Treasures, along with Pikmin, are exempt from this, and will also still hit properly. He has a slight windup before the chomp, so careful with your timing.

-Side Tilt:
Tyrantrum flails his arms around to scratch the opponent 4 times, each slash dealing a measly 1% with very poor knockback <4% total>. Kind of a piddly attack in range, power and utility, but it's his de-facto fastest attack. This is best used to get some hits in against an opponent's shield, as its true purpose is breaking shields.

-Up Tilt:
Tyrantrum takes a chomp straight upward. This move doesn't nullify any projectiles like the Neutral Attack does, but makes for a fantastic anti-air, given just how huge he is. Does around 9%, with some moderate upwards knockback.

-Down Tilt:
Tyrantrum stomps a foot straight down for a curbstomp <9%>. Can Meteor Smash at higher percentages if used off the ledge <the earliest being around 100%>.

-Dash Attack:
Tyrantrum does a frontflip and kicks out with both feet, similar to Riptor from Killer Instinct. Deals 8% damage, but with poor knockback.

-Ledge Grab: When you grab the ledge, Tyrantrum sinks his teeth into the stage for support.
- - Ledge Attack: Tyrantrum tosses himself up using his jaw, and straightens out for a body slam. The move has a very long recovery while Tyrantrum gets up, but the move deals 15% damage and slightly-higher-than-average-for-a-ledge-attack knockback as a concession to how hard it is for Tyrantrum to even get to the ledge in the first place.

Grab/Throws:
-Grab: Tyrantrum's grabs opponents with his teeth to plop them into his hands. The grab range is entirely within Tyrantrum's mouth. He grabs somewhat low to the ground, making the best course of action from right in front of him an aerial attack.

-Pummel: Tyrantrum crunch down on them with his teeth. Each Pummel attack does 3% damage
-Forward Throw: Tyrantrum tosses the opponent forward, then headbutts them away. 4% damage, with average throw knockback.
-Backward Throw: Tyrantrum slams the opponent down on the ground, then kicks them back behind him, dealing 7% damage. The throw leaves them on the floor with a small windbox pushed behind Tyrantrum, to simulate his kick sliding the opponent back.
-Up Throw: Tyrantrum grabs the opponent with his teeth and tosses them upward. 9% damage, but with a small, vertical knockback of fixed distance.
-Down Throw: Tyrantrum turns around, slams the opponent down, then gives a powerful 15% curbstomp. Think of it like Chief Thunder's hit-grab in Killer Instinct '13. The actual stomp has a Paralyzer-esque hitstun bonus, but only while Tyrantrum's foot os on the opponent; Once he releases the foot, the opponent will go into a groundbounce as if meteored onto the floor. Opponents can tech this groundbounce.

Aerial Normals:
-Neutral Aerial: Tyrantrum kicks both feet forward for 11% damage and some moderate horizontal knockback. This is his fastest Air Normal.
-Forward Aerial: Tyrantrum tries to grab the opponent with his stumpy arms. Poor reach as to be expected <less than half the reach of Bowser's Flying Slam>, but if he grabs you, he brings the opponent down for a powerful 20% frog splash, leaving them on the floor, similar to Snake's Down Throw in Brawl. In the case of connecting from off-stage, the opponent will always be KOd before Tyrantrum.
-Backward Aerial: Tyrantrum swings his tail down for a 10% Meteor Smash. He has a good bit of startup, so this is best for hard reads.
-Up Aerial: Tyrantrum chomps upward for a clean 10% and adequate upwa knockback. This move has the longest recovery time of his aerials that keep him in the air.
-Down Aerial: Tyrantrum stops in the air, readies his body and shoots downward with both feet extended. If it connects, opponents will be hit twice; Once for the kick that causes a untechable Meteor Smash <4%>, and again when Tyrantrum slams into the ground <9%> <13% total, with average upward-angled knockback>. Great to use when you keep getting hit into the air and need a fast way down <well, even faster than you already have naturally.>

Smash Attacks:
-Side Smash: Tyrantrum slowly brings his tail backwards before charging, then violently swings it forward with a golden aura emanating off of it. The hitbox of the move is entirely on the tail - no more, no less. Does 15% damage uncharged, and 23% fully charged, with great knockback. There is also some notable recovery, so make sure you connect.
-Up Smash: Tyrantrum jumps straight up for a powerful headbutt. Hits straight upward for 14% uncharged and 22% fully-charged and moderate upwards knockback. He kinda hangs in the air for a time after he jumps, so that's the time to strike him.
-Down Smash: Tyrantrum raises his leg to charge the Smash, and afterward slams his foot to the ground, pauses, then stomps again. Only hits in front of you, but the first hit buries opponents <no damage>, while the second hit is the one to deal damage, and sends opponents flying. As the first hit's burying requires you to be on the ground, this move basically does nothing but slam opponents to the ground if they are somehow hit out of the air, and they can either tech or roll out of the way before the second hit. To compensate, this move has downright monstrous power when charged, the best of any Smash Attack <25% uncharged and 40% fully-charged, along with being the best Smash Attack in regards to knockback.> However, it also tops the charts as the slowest and longest windup of all Smashes if you include the first hit as part of the windup towards the second, for it will take 3 seconds to get the full attack out even without charging; Ether know for sure you can get the bury, or get your timing and read skills trained enough to get the second strike on its own. That all said, both hits are just as susceptible to getting armored through as any other Smash, so be careful around a Bowser or Little Mac if you just try and spam to get the second hit, and try to NEVER-EVER-NEVER<!!!> GET THE SECOND HIT COUNTERED, for fear of the counterattack that would follow.

Special Moves:
-Neutral Special <Roar>: As Tyrantrum would be so big in the fight, it's just so that most people would try and fight him almost exclusively just for being the elephant-er, dinosaur-in the room. Naturally, he's gonna need a way to get some of that pressure off of him. Roar is a chargeable move that, when unleashed, lets Tyrantrum belt out a ferocious roar, sending out a windbox from around his entire character, the size and power of which can be charged indefinitely. That said, getting any overbearingly-powerful pushback takes an almost comically large charge time, so you should mostly just use it to get others off of you rather than actively go for enough power to KO a person just from Roar.

-Side Special <Rock Slide>: In a slight sendup of Hulk's Gamma Wave/Tsunami in the Marvel vs. Capcom series, Tyrantrum plants his foot inside of the ground, then kicks up, sending a group of Jigglypuff-sized, flat stones covered in gold energy flying up like a small concrete wave in front of him, the distance being half of Final Destination. Great power if it hits, and each individual sidewalk piece deals damage <6 stone chunks for 4% apiece, 24% in total>. Each stone piece also has fixed knockback to ensure you get knocked into where the next stone will pop up, and the last piece will have spikes on top, sending you upwards in an angle, and with a good knockback. That said, the stones count as physical projectiles, so watch out for reflect characters or a Villager. Using this move in the air will have Tyrantrum simply kick forward rather pitifully, but for nothing to come out from it. No damage from the air kick, either. This is a great move to use to get some space between you and other characters when Roar can't cut it, and is Tyrantrum's only keepaway attack that does damage.


-Up Special <Ancient Power>: This move has different properties between using it while standing and using it in the air.
- - When used on the ground: Tyrantrum kneels down as golden sand gathers beneath him. After a half-second, a stone spire made of golden aura erupts from under Tyrantrum, shooting him upward. The move has great upward range, but down right terrible horizontal recovery, similar to a Zelda using Farore's Wind upward. The spire deals 10% damage, and has fixed upward knockback to launch them straight upwards, close to Tyrantrum. The recovery on the move is just barely fast enough for Tyrantrum to get a single aerial move in, making this his ONLY way to get a combo in without items.

- - When used in the air: As Tyrantrum scrunches his body, golden sand swirls around his feet as it forms a gold-colored diamond. Tyrantrum then jumps off the diamond for a small last spurt of height <the tiniest smidge below Rising Uppercut, and that's already not saying much given the size difference between Mac and Tyrantrum>, but then drops at a dramatic speed as he goes into freefall. It has little to no horizontal recovery, so realistically you should only count on this move getting you to safety 100% of the time if you are directly below the ledge. As a concession, however, you keep your vertical momentum during the windup, so there's always the chance of that extra bit of height helping you to the ledge. The diamond itself is shot downwards, doing 10% damage with average non-meteor knockback. The diamond also counts as a physical projectile, so be wary of Reflectors and Pockets, though it will go through certain projectiles that can shoot upward. The main use for this move as an attack is to somehow get above your opponent and drop the diamond down towards them when there already is ground beneath you.

-Down Special <Endure>: Tyrantrum steels his body for a full second, then is buffed with 2 hits of hyper armor that is a guarantee to nullify not just flinching but also any hitstop from getting hit, no matter the opposing attack's original damage or knockback, the indicator being a dark-orange flashing over your body. However, as Endure can fail after repeated usage, in Smash Bros., the startup window on Tyrantrum's Endure increases by an extra half second after every time he can get a successful hit of armor. If he is hit out of the startup, he is dealt extra knockback, but the startup for Endure resets back to its default. You cannot reuse Endure while you still have armor left. As a concession, this only involves attacks that actually cause knockback to begin with, so attacks like Fox's Blaster that already cause no flinching won't take a cheap hit out of Tyrantrum's armor.

Final Smash:
-Final Smash <Rock Polish>: Tyrantrum coats his entire body with a golden aura, making him completely impervious to flinching. His attack speed is also greatly increased, making all attack animations twice as fast <both startup and recovery>, though there is no buff to walk speed, air speed or attack power. However, a Rock Polished Tyrantrum can still receive damage from non-grab attacks, so your main goal as Tyrantrum is to get your strongest attacks out with the attack speed buff, and not worry about any move having snail's-pace animations or anyone cutting attacks short.

Playstyle/Strategy
STAY. ABOVE. GROUND.
If you can, you will, quite frankly, ravage the competition, IF you can get attacks in <as big of an "if" as it is>. If you so much as slip off the ledge, LITTLE MAC will feel sorry for you as far as Tyrantrum's recovery game goes. You can jump and be in the air itself, just make sure there is something under your feet at all times.

For a battle plan, your modus operandi is to tear through the opponent before they have the chance to get you to the ledge. If you have to go airborne, go for it as long as you know for sure you can reach solid flooring. Make sure you can get either a Forward Air for damage or a Down Air to make a hasty getaway. When you can bust out Tyrantrum's trademark ground attacks, try and have a the armor from Endure stocked at all times, as that will be your ticket to getting that choice Dash Attack, or to bury opponents for the Down Smash's ruinous power.

Zoners and keepaway characters like Duck Hunt Trio, Ness and Olimar, as well as Rosalina, will be Tyrantrum's biggest weaknesses, as they can get the damage they need from a distance and get you to launchable damages before you can properly lay into them, and your massive size is nothing but an overgrown target to them. In this case, try as hard as you can to use your Neutral Attack's projectile-stopping properties and Rock Slide as a long-distance attack to help you reach them. In the case of Rosalina, Luma will go down in about 2 hits with as powerful as you'd be, so just shove him off the moment he respawns and gets sent off towards you.

Good set ups for him involve using Endure just as you get hit out of your last hit of armor, that way it'll help try and rearmor quickly given the extra startup. If you want to try and get the fully charged Down Smash, wait for just as an opponent is about to hit you with an attack that has slow recovery, so that even when they try for a second hit then it will just get armored through again if you have both armored hit stocked.

Other good strategies involve using the grounded Ancient Power to get a small air combo in, the Neutral Aerial for a fast move or the Forward Aerial for some heavy damage and a way back down to soil. There's also using Roar for a push followed by a Rock Slide to keep the pressure off of you against short-range characters like Captain Falcon, DK and Little Mac. If they try and run at you through the Roar, you can always use a quick Neutral Attack or try your luck with a Side Smash. Block-heavy players that shield all the time can be messed with via the Side Tilt, which trades damage and knockback for strong shield-crushing power.

And one last tip:
DO
NOT
GO
OFF-STAGE
EVER!!!
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 22, 2015
Messages
557
Location
Wokingham
OK, here's my revised Tyrantrum moveset, version 2.0
I'd just edit the old post, but i want it to stay there just so the feedback can still be understandable. That said, I WILL go ahead and edit this one for any other changes.
And so I can post without the spoiler bracket. Exposure, HO! =P

And sorry for what is technically a double-post

Tyrantrum
Universe: Pokemon
Game of Origin: Pokemon X/Pokemon Y <3DS, 2013>

Universal Stats:
- Size: 10-11 <big as he needs to be in order to be a class higher than Bowser, but not overly gigantic. Basically, as big as he can be without it clearly being silly about how big he is.>
- Weight: 10-11 <135>
- Ground Speed: 3
- Air Speed: 1
- Fall Speed: 11

-Number of successive jumps: 2
-Wall Jump: No
-Wall Cling: No
-Crawl: No

Tyrantrum is a huge, aggressive dinosaur of a Pokemon, and his attacks will most perfectly show that. His speed and air options are severely limited outside of techniques, but if he connects an attack, it'll hit like a freight train. He's bigger, meaner, and heavier than Bowser by a good margin, so good luck trying to knock this titan off the stage.

That said, if you DO get him off-stage, may as well consider Tyrantrum KO'd. Not only would his stage recovery be spectacularly horrible even compared to Little Mac's <though his air attacks in themselves aren't weakened like Mac's are>, but most of the moves are as ancient in speed as they are in strength, so you can almost assuredly get a counterattack in before Tyrantrum can land a hit. He also would have his size betray him in the air; His jump height is laughable compared to most characters, and he sinks like, well, a rock if he gets taken off-stage. Grabbing a Metal Box as Tyrantrum would be comparable to a do-or-die strategy in regards to his extra durability vs. the added fall speed.

Moveset:
Grounded Normals:
-Neutral Attack: Tyrantrum takes a hearty bite out of crime his opponent using his trademark jaw. He chomps in front of him, but he lowers his neck slightly to make sure he can get the smaller characters. Only hits once. Does about 7% damage, with minor knockback. Will destroy non-explosive projectiles, but only if it connects with Tyrantrum's mouth. Explosives and items will still connect. Large beam-type projectiles, such as the Daybreak or the vertical beams from the Three Sacred Treasures, along with Pikmin, are exempt from this, and will also still hit properly. He has a slight windup before the chomp, so careful with your timing.
-Side Tilt: Tyrantrum flails his arms around to scratch the opponent 4 times, each slash dealing a measly 1% with very poor knockback <4% total>. Kind of a piddly attack in range, power and utility, but it's his de-facto fastest attack. This is best used to get some hits in against an opponent's shield, as its true purpose is breaking shields.
-Up Tilt: Tyrantrum takes a chomp straight upward. This move doesn't nullify any projectiles like the Neutral Attack does, but makes for a fantastic anti-air, given just how huge he is. Does around 9%, with some moderate upwards knockback.
-Down Tilt: Tyrantrum stomps a foot straight down for a curbstomp <9%>. Can Meteor Smash at higher percentages if used off the ledge <the earliest being around 100%>.
-Dash Attack: Tyrantrum does a frontflip and kicks out with both feet, similar to Riptor from Killer Instinct. Deals 8% damage, but with poor knockback.

Grab/Throws:
-Grab: Tyrantrum's grabs opponents with his teeth to plop them into his hands. The grab range is entirely within Tyrantrum's mouth. He grabs somewhat low to the ground, making the best course of action from right in front of him an aerial attack.

-Pummel: Tyrantrum crunch down on them with his teeth. Each Pummel attack does 3% damage
-Forward Throw: Tyrantrum tosses the opponent forward, then headbutts them away. 4% damage, with average throw knockback.
-Backward Throw: Tyrantrum slams the opponent down on the ground, then kicks them back behind him, dealing 7% damage. The throw leaves them on the floor with a small windbox pushed behind Tyrantrum, to simulate his kick sliding the opponent back.
-Up Throw: Tyrantrum grabs the opponent with his teeth and tosses them upward. 9% damage, but with a small, vertical knockback of fixed distance.
-Down Throw: Tyrantrum turns around, slams the opponent down, then gives a powerful 20% curbstomp. Think of it like Chief Thunder's hit-grab in Killer Instinct '13. The actual stomp has a Paralyzer-esque hitstun bonus, but only while Tyrantrum's foot os on the opponent; Once he releases the foot, the opponent will go into a groundbounce as if meteored onto the floor.

Aerial Normals:
-Neutral Aerial: Tyrantrum kicks both feet forward for 11% damage and some moderate horizontal knockback. This is his fastest Air Normal.
-Forward Aerial: Tyrantrum tries to grab the opponent with his stumpy arms. Poor reach as to be expected <less than half the reach of Bowser's Flying Slam>, but if he grabs you, he brings the opponent down for a powerful 20% frog splash, leaving them on the floor, similar to Snake's Down Throw in Brawl. In the case of connecting from off-stage, the opponent will always be KOd before Tyrantrum.
-Backward Aerial: Tyrantrum swings his tail down for a 10% Meteor Smash. He has a good bit of startup, so this is best for hard reads.
-Up Aerial: Tyrantrum chomps upward for a clean 10% and adequate upwa knockback. This move has the longest recovery time of his aerials that keep him in the air.
-Down Aerial: Tyrantrum stops in the air, readies his body and shoots downward with both feet extended. If it connects, opponents will be hit twice; Once for the kick that causes a untechable Meteor Smash <4%>, and again when Tyrantrum slams into the ground <9%> <13% total, with average upward-angled knockback>. Great to use when you keep getting hit into the air and need a fast way down <well, even faster than you already have naturally.>

Smash Attacks:
-Side Smash: Tyrantrum slowly brings his tail backwards before charging, then violently swings it forward with a golden aura emanating off of it. The hitbox of the move is entirely on the tail - no more, no less. Does 15% damage uncharged, and 23% fully charged, with great knockback. There is also some notable recovery, so make sure you connect.
-Up Smash: Tyrantrum jumps straight up for a powerful headbutt. Hits straight upward for 14% uncharged and 22% fully-charged and moderate upwards knockback. He kinda hangs in the air for a time after he jumps, so that's the time to strike him.
-Down Smash: Tyrantrum raises his leg to charge the Smash, and afterward slams his foot to the ground, pauses, then stomps again. Only hits in front of you, but the first hit buries opponents <no damage>, while the second hit is the one to deal damage, and sends opponents flying. As the first hit's burying requires you to be on the ground, this move basically does nothing but slam opponents to the ground if they are somehow hit out of the air, and they can either tech or roll out of the way before the second hit. To compensate, this move has downright monstrous power when charged, the best of any Smash Attack <25% uncharged and 40% fully-charged, along with being the best Smash Attack in regards to knockback.> However, it also tops the charts as the slowest and longest windup of all Smashes if you include the first hit as part of the windup towards the second, for it will take 3 seconds to get the full attack out even without charging; Ether know for sure you can get the bury, or get your timing and read skills trained enough to get the second strike on its own. That all said, both hits are just as susceptible to getting armored through as any other Smash, so be careful around a Bowser or Little Mac if you just try and spam to get the second hit, and try to NEVER-EVER-NEVER<!!!> GET THE SECOND HIT COUNTERED, for fear of the counterattack that would follow.

Special Moves:
-Neutral Special <Roar>: As Tyrantrum would be so big in the fight, it's just so that most people would try and fight him almost exclusively just for being the elephant-er, dinosaur-in the room. Naturally, he's gonna need a way to get some of that pressure off of him. Roar is a chargeable move that, when unleashed, lets Tyrantrum belt out a ferocious roar, sending out a windbox from around his entire character, the size and power of which can be charged indefinitely. That said, getting any overbearingly-powerful pushback takes an almost comically large charge time, so you should mostly just use it to get others off of you rather than actively go for enough power to KO a person just from Roar.

-Side Special <Rock Slide>: In a slight sendup of Hulk's Gamma Wave/Tsunami in the Marvel vs. Capcom series, Tyrantrum plants his foot inside of the ground, then kicks up, sending a group of Jigglypuff-sized, flat stones covered in gold energy flying up like a small concrete wave in front of him, the distance being half of Final Destination. Great power if it hits, and each individual sidewalk piece deals damage <6 stone chunks for 4% apiece, 24% in total>. Each stone piece also has fixed knockback to ensure you get knocked into where the next stone will pop up, and the last piece will have spikes on top, sending you upwards in an angle, and with a good knockback. That said, the stones count as physical projectiles, so watch out for reflect characters or a Villager. Using this move in the air will have Tyrantrum simply kick forward rather pitifully, but for nothing to come out from it. No damage from the air kick, either. This is a great move to use to get some space between you and other characters when Roar can't cut it, and is Tyrantrum's only keepaway attack that does damage.


-Up Special <Ancient Power>: This move has different properties between using it while standing and using it in the air.
- - When used on the ground: Tyrantrum kneels down as golden sand gathers beneath him. After a half-second, a stone spire made of golden aura erupts from under Tyrantrum, shooting him upward. The move has great upward range, but down right terrible horizontal recovery, similar to a Zelda using Farore's Wind upward. The spire deals 10% damage, and has fixed upward knockback to launch them straight upwards, close to Tyrantrum. The recovery on the move is just barely fast enough for Tyrantrum to get a single aerial move in, making this his ONLY way to get a combo in without items.

- - When used in the air: As Tyrantrum scrunches his body, golden sand swirls around his feet as it forms a gold-colored diamond. Tyrantrum then jumps off the diamond for a small last spurt of height <the tiniest smidge below Rising Uppercut, and that's already not saying much given the size difference between Mac and Tyrantrum>, but then drops at a dramatic speed as he goes into freefall. It has little to no horizontal recovery, so realistically you should only count on this move getting you to safety 100% of the time if you are directly below the ledge. As a concession, however, you keep your vertical momentum during the windup, so there's always the chance of that extra bit of height helping you to the ledge. The diamond itself is shot downwards, doing 10% damage with average non-meteor knockback. The diamond also counts as a physical projectile, so be wary of Reflectors and Pockets, though it will go through certain projectiles that can shoot upward. The main use for this move as an attack is to somehow get above your opponent and drop the diamond down towards them when there already is ground beneath you.

-Down Special <Endure>: Tyrantrum steels his body for a full second, then is buffed with 2 hits of hyper armor that is a guarantee to nullify not just flinching but also any hitstop from getting hit, no matter the opposing attack's original damage or knockback, the indicator being a dark-orange flashing over your body. However, as Endure can fail after repeated usage, in Smash Bros., the startup window on Tyrantrum's Endure increases by an extra half second after every time he can get a successful hit of armor. If he is hit out of the startup, he is dealt extra knockback, but the startup for Endure resets back to its default. You cannot reuse Endure while you still have armor left. As a concession, this only involves attacks that actually cause knockback to begin with, so attacks like Fox's Blaster that already cause no flinching won't take a cheap hit out of Tyrantrum's armor.

Final Smash:
-Final Smash <Rock Polish>: Tyrantrum coats his entire body with a golden aura, making him completely impervious to flinching. His attack speed is also greatly increased, making all attack animations twice as fast <both startup and recovery>, though there is no buff to walk speed, air speed or attack power. However, a Rock Polished Tyrantrum can still receive damage from non-grab attacks, so your main goal as Tyrantrum is to get your strongest attacks out with the attack speed buff, and not worry about any move having snail's-pace animations or anyone cutting attacks short.

Playstyle/Strategy
STAY. ABOVE. GROUND.
If you can, you will, quite frankly, ravage the competition, IF you can get attacks in <as big of an "if" as it is>. If you so much as slip off the ledge, LITTLE MAC will feel sorry for you as far as Tyrantrum's recovery game goes. You can jump and be in the air itself, just make sure there is something under your feet at all times.

For a battle plan, your modus operandi is to tear through the opponent before they have the chance to get you to the ledge. If you have to go airborne, go for it as long as you know for sure you can reach solid flooring. Make sure you can get either a Forward Air for damage or a Down Air to make a hasty getaway. When you can bust out Tyrantrum's trademark ground attacks, try and have a the armor from Endure stocked at all times, as that will be your ticket to getting that choice Dash Attack, or to bury opponents for the Down Smash's ruinous power.

Zoners and keepaway characters like Duck Hunt Trio, Ness and Olimar, as well as Rosalina, will be Tyrantrum's biggest weaknesses, as they can get the damage they need from a distance and get you to launchable damages before you can properly lay into them, and your massive size is nothing but an overgrown target to them. In this case, try as hard as you can to use your Neutral Attack's projectile-stopping properties and Rock Slide as a long-distance attack to help you reach them. In the case of Rosalina, Luma will go down in about 2 hits with as powerful as you'd be, so just shove him off the moment he respawns and gets sent off towards you.

Good set ups for him involve using Endure just as you get hit out of your last hit of armor, that way it'll help try and rearmor quickly given the extra startup. If you want to try and get the fully charged Down Smash, wait for just as an opponent is about to hit you with an attack that has slow recovery, so that even when they try for a second hit then it will just get armored through again if you have both armored hit stocked.

Other good strategies involve using the grounded Ancient Power to get a small air combo in, the Neutral Aerial for a fast move or the Forward Aerial for some heavy damage and a way back down to soil. There's also using Roar for a push followed by a Rock Slide to keep the pressure off of you against short-range characters like Captain Falcon, DK and Little Mac. If they try and run at you through the Roar, you can always use a quick Neutral Attack or try your luck with a Side Smash. Block-heavy players that shield all the time can be messed with via the Side Tilt, which trades damage and knockback for strong shield-crushing power.

And one last tip:
DO
NOT
GO
OFF-STAGE
EVER!!!
OMG. Awesome moveset man! I read the whole thing except part of the Playstyle/Strategy. The attacks fit the character image well (especially as I thought the Up Tilt, Up Air, Down Smash and Down Air would look weird in gameplay, until I saw the picture a second time), and I feel the you have thought hard about balancing issues, as he is stronger than Bowser.

Oh. I need to read all of the other movesets on this page now.
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2015
Messages
557
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Wokingham
Roy
Roy and Marth were almost identical in Melee. The only big difference was the charge time of Flare Blade, and of course, his awesome red hair. In Project M, however, he was reduced to a semi-clone, having some differences from Marth, though still not having very unique moves.
The purpose of this moveset is to make Roy even more different from Marth (and to, of course, show off my skills).
Most of his slices make an orange path, like before. His jump also no longer makes the annoying 'hoa' sound.

Standard Attacks
Neutral Attack (Jab)
This is based on Marth's Dancing Blade. It is made up of 4 hits, starting with a small overhead swipe, followed by a forward stab, then a slash from down to up, like Marth's Side Tilt, finishing with an overhead slash. Holding down the A button without hitting an object will activate the first swing only, yet if making contact with something it will activate the first 2 swings. To actually finish this jab combo you have to mash the A button.

Side Tilt
Roy slashes forward from his left to his right, like Ike's Side Tilt. Quick and without much end lag, but isn't too powerful. Does about 9% damage and moderate knockback.



To be continued
 
Joined
May 23, 2014
Messages
809
Location
The room down the hall
Switch FC
1951-3245-1423
Spooky Scary Skeleton Link
THIS is a moveset I can get behind! It'd be a breath of fresh air to get a Link all about techniques instead of not-sword/shield weapons or gadgets. It would also help keep the theme of all the non-toon Zelda characters being in their Twilight Princess era appearances <as much as I would prefer a SS character like Groose, Impa or Ghirahim.>
 
Joined
Apr 7, 2014
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849
Location
Looking for those who like Mighty No 9
3DS FC
1693-3075-2999
NNID
ivanquote
I'm back with my second moveset (after how many months?) Regardless, I feel I put a lot more effort into this one. Hopefully my improvment from Mega Beedrill shows

Aban Hawkins

Aban Hawkins is the main character from the indie game 1001 Spikes. He is a man involved with shady dealings of all kinds that tends to lead him to deadly ruins. All of this stems from the need to out preform the world famous treasure hunter and abusive father, Jim Hawkins. Aban is blessed with two different jump buttons in his game: low jump and high jump. With these, he is able to maneuver himself around a multitude of deadly traps as he explores ruins. It is often described as “the lovechild of I Wanna be the Guy and Super Meat Boy.”


I'm not kidding

It is a tough platforming game that takes homage to tough platformers in the 80’s – 90’s. In fact, there are several costumes based on such games that he can wear to gain a similar playstyle and theme. His mobility and control will carry over to his fighting style in Smash.

Statistics:

Size: 8 (About as tall as Captain Falcon, but he slouches like Wolf, making him stand at around Link’s height)

Weight: 5 (Around Pit’s weight, making him a bit light for his size)

Fall Speed: 5 (Around Ness’s fall speed. Rather floaty for someone his size)

Jump: FANTASTIC jumping prowess (he rises about twice his character height, easily one of the best in the game.) His double jump is no slouch either, at a wee bit below this height. He’s from a Platform Hell, so what else do you expect? His “short hop” is a bit different in the sense that it’s set at once his height, just like the jumping in his game. Furthermore, the double jump can be short hopped in a similar manner as well. Also, taking inspiration from when he cosplayed as a ninja, he can cling to walls and wall jump.

Air Speed: 9 (Really high. If you’ve gone through half the stuff he’s done, you’d need spot on air control as well)

Ground Speed: 5 (Average running speed)

Traction: 10 (He’s a master at keeping his footing; he doesn’t even slip on ice)

Standards:

Jab: 3-hit combo. He punches twice then slashes diagonally upward with a knife (3, 2, 5). This is the only knife standard without a sweetspot gimmick, so it is quite reliable in that regard. It is also quick to come out and quick to end.

S Tilt: He simply kicks forwards. Does 9%, comes out quick, and has good range (around that of Ganondorf’s.) Knockback is not bad and launches the opponent horizontally.

U Tilt: He slashes a knife in an arc over his head. Has less range than most attacks of this nature (only hurts around the knife, not the arm) but depending on where the opponent is hit, they will be launched in a different trajectory (straight upwards [13%], or 75 degrees upwards to either side[8%]) depending on where the knife is pointing at the time. The sweetspot is at the apex of the arc and it launches slightly more there

D Tilt: He slices at the opponent’s feet with a knife. Has a high chance of tripping in the sour spot (6%), but launches somewhat strongly when sweetspotted, which is in the middle of the animation (12%). If the opponent is in the air, the sweetspot can spike, which is especially helpful on the ledge near the ledge, but the attack has short range, so he needs to be at the very edge in order to get a clean hit.

Dash:



He grabs a knife from the inside of his coat and slashes forward with one clean stroke. He has large acceleration once he begins the attack, making him appear to slide (12%); this makes it good for DACUS. The sweet spot on this one is arguably the most difficult to pull off (it only lasts about 2 frames) and it occurs right as he slashes the knife. However, if he does pull it off, it is one of the strongest dashes in the game (26%)! The downside is its horrible ending lag if it misses (roughly 2.5 seconds).

Smashes:

F Smash (Dart Trap):


See the face block on the left shooting darts, it is your worst nightmare

A stone block that appears to have a face on it (size of a crate) materializes in Aban’s hands. After charging, he drops it in front of him. Despite its size, it is actually weaker than most f smashes (8% fully charged and next to no knockback, and knocks the foe upward VERY slightly [cannot KO below 400%], effectively proving it to be helpful to an opponent who has lost their jumps if dropped off stage). The block cannot be picked up again and when a player (including Aban) gets within 4 Mario widths of the face, the mouth opens and shoots out a poisonous dart as long as Sheik’s needles, but about 5 times the width (in other words, actually visible). The dart travels as fast and far as a blaster shot from Falco and is much stronger than the block itself (23% with high knockback, charged or otherwise). It has only a limited number of darts though; the number is dependent on how long you charge the smash (2 darts with no charge, 8 fully charged.) Once the block runs out of darts, it crumbles.



U Smash(Type 1- Energy Sword):

Hello.png

Insert Halo quip here.

He pulls out a blue energy sword from the Halo series and swings it upwards from the ground (yes really.) It hits evenly throughout the attack (no sweet/sour spot and deals 14%) and complements Aban’s DACUS proficiency well. It has above average KO potential, but is not the strongest in the game.

D Smash: Facing the fourth wall, he bends down in a 3 point landing pose and raises his free hand in the air in a fist. He then punches the ground and a set of blood-stained spikes (3 spikes per set, each about as tall as Aban, the second picture posted provides a good reference) pops out of the ground on either side of him. It takes around 2 second for the spikes to retreat (during which Aban is immobile and vulnerable from above), but it does the most damage right when the spikes come up, at which point it is one of the strongest d smashes in the game (22%). Furthermore, the spikes when up have high priority to block projectiles, protecting Aban from the sides. Unfortunately, once the spikes retreat, Aban is vulnerable for another 0.5 seconds.

Aerial:

Nair:


SHORYUKEN!!!

Aban borrows his jerk of a father’s spinning uppercut for his nair. While this may seem to be a good move for a uair, the hitbox actually covers Aban’s entire body. Also, it does not slow up momentum or send Aban upwards or anything like that. While weak (10%) knockback wise, the hitbox has relatively high priority and is a good way to approach enemies.

Fair: He clasps both his hands together and slams them downwards in front of him. Visually and mechanically similar to DK’s fair. The main difference between the two is that it starts up more quickly, is weaker damage wise (12%), has a bit less range (Aban has shorter arms), and has more ending lag if whiffed, but like Greninja’s dair, it bumps Aban upwards if it hits.

Bair:


What a hot trap!

He produces a flamethrower trap in his hands and sends a wave of fire behind him (3% each hit for a total of up to 27%). This wave of fire moves in a downwards arc, making it difficult to avoid, and hits multiple times to rack up damage. It cannot launch, but has a pretty long range behind him. Also, it starts and ends quickly, but it is a long attack, leaving you open if missed.

Uair: Aban crosses two knives above him and slashes outwards. The sweetspot on this one is right after he begins slashing outwards (when the knife tips overlay, 16%) and knocks the opponent upwards. The other spots knock the opponent sideways (10%).

Dair: A wooden crate materializes beneath Aban and he turns it to splinters with the heel of his boot. The sweetspot is in the center, where it spikes the opponent downwards (17%). In all other areas, the splinters hit multiple times and send the opponent upwards (1-2% each hit for a total of 10%).

Grabs:

Grab:


What a horrible knight!

Snaps out a Castlevania-like whip in front of him to grab opponents. Acts as a tether recovery. When using it as a Zair, the tip of the whip has a relatively strong sweet spot for an attack of this nature (10%), but this is the only part that damages the opponent. If the opponent is at very high damage, this could be used to sneak in a KO.

Pummel: He hits the opponent on the head with the hilt of his blade (2%). Average all around.

F Throw: Swipes twice with a knife, flips it to a backhand grip, and lunges forward (2, 2, 7%). Launches well horizontally, making it good for KO’s, but Aban has a bit of cooldown, so it’s not good for following up.

B Throw: He stabs the opponent with one knife, circles around, and then slices upwards at their back with a second knife (3, 4%). Launches at a 75 degree angle and is not too strong, but it has very little cooldown, allowing Aban to follow up with aerial attacks.

U Throw: Tosses the opponent upwards a set distance where a disappearing block spawns on top of them, launching them (2, 8%). Any opponents around the block when it spawns also get launched upwards at 8%. Probably the least useful throw for Aban, but still not a terrible move.

D Throw: He lays the opponent on the ground, steps back, then watches as a set of spikes pops up beneath the opponent (12%). This is weaker than a down smash, but strong by down throw standards and the spikes cause significantly less lag on Aban, and can be followed up at low percents.

Specials:

Neutral: (Knife Throw)



Very similar to Mega Man’s jab. He throws knives that have the range of ¾ Final Destination. The knives themselves are about 3 times longer than Mega Man’s lemons and 3 knives can be on the screen at a time (each does 6%). On the ground, Aban is completely immobile, but in the air his momentum is not affected, so he can move freely.

Side: (Scorpion)


Scorpion: Hey Aban, I'm a Scorpio; what's your sign?

Aban drops a purple scorpion with red eyes in front of him. It moves about as slowly as a Waddle Dee and will turn around if it encounters a ledge, but if it sees a character in front of it (sight about 4 Mario widths) the scorpion will without hesitation sprint towards the character at the speed of Fox’s dash! While it’s running it has small knockback (7%), it will poison the enemy for a short amount of time (2% per second for 6 seconds, will reset the timer if hit by the scorpion again). It will stop running when it hits a wall or it dashes off the edge. The scorpion has 15% HP; if hit by an attack that doesn’t 1 shot it, it will stop, turn around, and run in the other direction, so attacking from behind is not very effective (it has invincibility the moment it turns around). When its HP is depleted, it will explode into light.

Up: (Falling Block) A grey stone block with a rectangular spiral pattern on it the size of a crate appears below Aban and he does a short jump off of it in a mostly vertical recovery (1.5 character heights). The block falls as Aban jumps off of it. If it falls on an opponent, it shatters, doing high damage (16%) and knockback and acts as a meteor smash in the air. If it lands on the ground, it basically becomes an itemless crate, being able to be lifted and thrown (when thrown, it will break on contact with whatever it hits, be it a character or the ground). If this move is used on the ground, Aban just produces a block below him. Only one crate can be on screen, so if Aban uses another Up B, the existing block will just break (no damage).

Down: (Spike Trap) This is a trap much like Snake’s Down Smash. It cannot be used in the air or while moving. Animation-wise, he bends down slightly and lightly taps the ground with his hand, followed by a soft “click” sound. The three red spike tips just barely poke out of the ground when on standby. When stepped on (by Aban or other characters) the spikes rise up, knocking the opponent upwards strongly (17%).

Final Smash (The Lost Levels):

Aban crosses his arms above him, brings them down to his sides and roars. When he does, his pupils and irises disappear, he glows with a golden aura, and 3 sets of golden spikes rise from the ground (one “on top” of him and one on both sides.) The spikes are a bit crooked, so they do not have purely vertical hitboxes. If he is in the air or close to a ledge, disappearing blocks show up as needed for spikes to come out of them. If anyone gets hit, they get transported into a cinematic. The characters (and Aban) land in some trap-filled ruins where one of seven events could happen to the opponents (the event that occurs is random, but will only happen exclusively to the character that got the specific event. In other words, if all seven opponents in an 8-player smash get hit by the final smash, each character will get a different event.)

1. The character stands around and a ceiling block falls on them

2. Once the ceiling block falls, all other characters will start moving forwards. A scorpion runs in from out of nowhere and body tackles a character offscreen.

3. Right after the scorpion appears, an Indiana Jones-styled boulder rolls over another character from the foreground.

4. The characters come up to a pit with floating blocks over it. All but one start platforming over the blocks. The one who hesitates has spikes pop up from underneath them, knocking them offscreen.

5. When jumping across the blocks, a disappearing block appears above a character’s head, making them fall into the pit.

6. When jumping across the blocks, one character gets sniped out of the air by a random poison dart.

7. Aban is the first one to make it across the pit onto solid ground. The final character lands on the very edge behind Aban. Aban turns around to do his victory pose, but in doing so, accidentally backhands the opponent in the face, knocking them into the pit. Unfazed, Aban looks at the fourth wall where the camera zooms in on his face and he smiles, his teeth glinting.

Regardless of which event the opponent is offed by, all opponents receive the same damage and knockback. It is a bit on the long side for a cinematic final smash (10-11 seconds, the whole cinematic shows every time, 35%). It can kill at good percentages.


Playstyle:

Aban is a character with fantastic mobility and air control. His attacks are only strong when sweetspotted and are very lackluster otherwise, and his sweetspots tend to be in awkward places in the attacks, so he is difficult to master. Many of his attacks spike the enemy downwards, so use that to your advantage. With his various assortment of long ranged attacks (B, FSmash, Bair, Side B, and Up B), along with his lingering spikes (DSmash, Down B, and Down Throw), he is great at ledge guarding and keeping opponents away. Due to his large hitbox and floatiness though, he can easily be juggled, so watch out. He is a character in which you need to observe your opponent carefully, then finish them off with precision.

Palette Swap:

Untitled.png

Some colors may be different than in the descriptions

Many of the costumes included here are costumes Aban had in his game (or palette swaps of which for the sake of color variety). There were many homages to choose from that some were inevitably left out (Contra, Super Mario, Halo, and Uncharted to be specific), but I feel this is the most diversified list.

(Standard) Tan-ish hat and jacket

(Fighter) Inspired by Street Fighter (more specifically Akuma). Dark red hair and black gi.

(Slayer) Inspired by Castlevania. Red armor with a white cross on the chest and black bottoms

(Knight) Inspired by Ghosts and Goblins. Wears golden knight armor and has a dirty blond beard.

(Antarctic) Green Ice Climbers-esque parka.

(Ninja) Inspired by Ninja Gaiden. Blue-violet ninja garb with blood red sports bandages on wrists and ankles

(Tina) Based on Aban’s sister. Standard costume, but with pink jacket, brown hair, and pink aviator goggles on head instead of the hat

(Jim) Based of Aban’s jerk of a father. Standard costume, but with grey jacket, no hat, white hair, and a thick white beard

Taunt:

Taunt 1: He looks at the fourth wall, shrugs, and shakes his head

Taunt 2: He lowers whatever he is wearing on his head (or makes the motion if he lacks a head piece) and grimaces

Taunt 3: He tenses his arms, raises his head, and ROARS skywards.

Entrance: A stone block falls onto the stage with him on it (3 point landing pose). The block shatters as he jumps off.
Victory:

Pose 1: He jumps down from off screen, looks at the 4th wall, and gives a thumbs up.

Pose 2: He spot-dodges 2 flying darts, jumps over a set of spikes popping up beneath him, and somersaults out of the way of a falling block, ending in a pose with one knee to the ground.

Pose 3: He throws 3 knives in different directions, then produces one more, slicing diagonally upwards, ending in a pose with his arm across his chest whilst holding the knife.

Victory Music: Title Theme



[collapse=CUSTOM MOVES]
B2: (Shotgun) He gets out his idiot Dad’s shotgun and sends 7 pellets in a fan pattern for one shot (3% per pellet). Can only shoot one round at a time and has a 1 second cooldown. Next to no knockback, but if used right next to an opponent, damage can be racked up really quickly.

B3: (Pistol) He gets out his sister’s pistol and sends shoots bullets. These bullets are smaller, faster, and more powerful than the knives (8%), but they have the range of ¼ FD’s and only 2 can be on screen at a time.

Side B2: (Rabid Scorpion) Scorpion is red with golden eyes. It now dashes all the time, jumps when it finds an edge (it can leap between the 2 Battlefield platforms), and will only turn around if it hits a wall. It has more knockback (13%), but does not poison and dies in 1% HP. Oddly counts as a projectile and can be “reflected” back at Aban.

Side B3: (Steadfast Scorpion) Scorpion is golden with black eyes. It moves at a constant speed and never dashes regardless of where the opponent is (roughly Marth’s walk speed). It does not fall off of ledges and will not flinch under any attack (35% HP). It does not do as much damage with opponent contact (3%), but it still poisons.

Up B2: (Disappearing Block)


I think TV Tropes would refer to these blocks as "Shrinking Violets"

The block disappears as soon as he jumps off of it, but his jump height is doubled. If the disappearing block spawns on top of another character, it causes slight damage (5%) and upward knockback.

Up B3: (Ice Block) Half vertical recovery height, but moves more horizontally. The block moves forward too and slides on the ground without losing speed, like a rolling crate. It hits opponents for less damage (8%) and can’t be picked up, but it freezes opponents on contact.

Down B2: (Icicle Trap)


Compared to the regular spikes, these are pretty chill

The spikes are icy blue, twice as tall and freeze the opponent on contact. They are much weaker though (10%).

Down B3: (Fire Trap)


Technology sure is incredible! You can now have red flames burn you to death with simple motion activation!

The trap when hidden is a bit easier to see (it looks like a grey panel on the ground), but it does not activate or hurt Aban if he steps on it. When activated, some fire the same size as the standard spikes shoots out of the ground for 3 seconds. It doesn’t launch well, but it pulls opponents in and racks up a lot of damage (up to 28%).
[/collapse]

[collapse=Stage: Jutulstraumen(spoilers)]
A stage based on the last level of the game in which you ride a robotic flying snake contraption. Instead of describing it in detail, I’ll just link a video to the level and list the differences made: SPOILERS!!!

There will be less ceiling and floor spaces. This will make the stage less boxed in and easier to KO opponents.

The main stage itself cannot be damaged by players or dropping the crystals on it.

The stage will move up and down more slowly and less frequently. It will also not be as close to the ceiling or to the floor to provide more fighting room.

The spikes on the serpent will have a longer start up and will only appear on one segment at a time (15%). The head and tail function exactly like the rest of the segments (they do not constantly have spikes on them.) The head and tail have grabbable ledges, but the tail becomes ungrabbable when spikes are produced (one can still hang on the head ledge while spikes are active there without taking damage, but if they do a ledge attack or roll onto the stage, they’ll take damage from the spikes after the roll/attack has finished.)

If spikes pop up on the stage underside, anyone who hits it will be spiked downwards.

Each segment is about 2-3 Mario’s wide.

Ice chunks can still fall from the upper boundary. They knock opponents at a 30 degree angle upwards.

Red gems can be grabbed and thrown. They produce high knockback.

The stage moves a bit slower, meaning if anyone lands on ground pieces they have a chance to recover before being swept away by the camera.

The omega version of this stage is the ruined version remaining completely static. There are no ceiling/floor areas or spikes obviously.
Music:

Rush into Ruin/Snake Boss

Ukampa Medley (World 3 Fast (1 loop, 24 sec), World 5 Fast (up to 0:26), World 4 Fast (to song's loop), World 2 Fast (to song's loop), repeat)

Antarctica Medley (World 7 Fast, World 9 Fast, World 8 Fast, World 8, World 10)

Theme of the Hawkins Family

Tower of Nannar Medley (Title, Stage 5, Stage 6, Stage 4, Boss Gigante)

NES Platformer Medley (Vampire Killer, Ghosts 'n Goblins, Contra, Ninja Gaiden, Bloody Tears)

[/collapse]

[collapse=Item (Golden Vase)]


See that jar in the center? GRAB IT!!
Similar to how the Team Healer appears in team battles, this item only appears in coin battles. While holding it, you cannot attack (regular or special), and you drop it if you get any amount of knockback, but you get a steady increase in coins (about 15 per second). After about 7 seconds of being held during the time after it spawned, the rate at which you get coins quadruples and after 10 seconds of being held total, it will explode in a fiery blast. If flung at an enemy right before it explodes, it will produce large knockback (though it may sometimes be a dud, after which point it will no longer give up coins.) Also this item can be attacked on the ground; it will give out coins when attacked. In general, it is a risk vs reward item in which you push your luck to see how many coins you can get.
[/collapse]

[collapse=Smash Run Enemy (Guardian Penguin) ]

KILL IT WITH FIRE!!!

Based on possibly the most aggravating enemy from 1001 Spikes, we have a penguin. It is the size of about a bit taller than Snake and functions similarly to Aban’s Scorpion, but much more aggravating. It waddles around at a snail’s pace (Waddle Dee’s walking speed) and can see in a sector of 45 degrees up and down radius of 0.5 Final Destination. If your character jumps, starts a dash, uses a Smash Run power, or uses a B move, all penguins on the map will halt and look upwards behind them at a 45 degree angle (effectively preventing most from jumping over them.) If you are spotted, it will jump twice its height into the air (fast falling afterwards) and sprint toward your character at literal Sonic speed! It has high knockback, will chase you for about 10 seconds (turning around and running at you again if it passes you), will turn around in midair if it senses a bottomless pit below it and run back onto the platform, and will be your worst nightmare in enclosed spaces. After 10 seconds, it will stop chasing you and (hopefully) face away from you as to not see you again. Also it has perfect super armor, so you can forget about knocking it away. Even if you do damage it, it has health on the lines of a Devil Car AND will jump when hit, so it is difficult to face. It one weakness is being grabbed. It cannot be grabbed when it is running around, so you have to WALK to it while its back is turned and grab it (he will see you if you try a running grab). When thrown, it does massive damage comparable to throwing a Met, Shield Ghost, or Octorok, and it will lie on the ground should it survive, letting you finish it off with a regular attack or another grab. Comparatively speaking, it is a somewhat rare enemy (for good reason) and is one you will have to be very careful around.
[/collapse]
 
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Joined
Feb 22, 2015
Messages
557
Location
Wokingham
Roy

Roy and Marth were almost identical in Melee. The only big difference was the charge time of Flare Blade, and of course, his awesome red hair. In Project M, however, he was reduced to a semi-clone, having some differences from Marth, though still not having very unique moves.
The purpose of this moveset is to make Roy even more different from Marth (and to, of course, show off my skills).
Most of his slices make an orange path, like before. His jump also no longer makes the annoying 'hoa' sound.


Standard Attacks
Neutral Attack (Jab)
This is based on Marth's Dancing Blade. It is made up of 4 hits, starting with a small overhead swipe, followed by a forward stab, then a slash up through the space in front of him, like Marth's Side Tilt, finishing with an overhead slash. Holding down the A button without hitting an object will activate the first swing only, yet if making contact with something it will activate the first 2 swings. To actually finish this jab combo you have to mash the A button. If all hits connect it should do 12% (2+2+3+5).

Side Tilt
Roy slashes forward from across the space in front of him from his left to his right, like Ike's Side Tilt. Quick and without end lag, but isn't too powerful. Does 9% damage on the hilt, 7% on the lower end, and 8% on the tip. Low knockback.

Down Tilt
A lower stab, based off the second hit of Marth's Dancing Blade. Of course the animation adapts to his crouch position. Moves him forward slightly while doing it, which is also present in his old Down Tilt. Moderate end lag.

Up Tilt
Basically an uppercut. Based off the last hit of Marth's Dancing Blade, angled up. Does not hit behind him, and has low start lag but high end lag. Will do 11% damage on the hilt, 8% damage on the lower end, and 10% on the tip. Good for finishing off combos as it has the ability to KO at high percentages, and comes out fast. This move can be punished easily if your opponent manages to avoid it, due to the high end lag.

Dash Attack

Roy does the stabbing action, not as low as the Down Tilt but still slightly low. If it hits on the hilt, the opponent will be flung 45* up and forward, doing about 16% damage and high knockback. However if it hits on the tip, they will be launched 70* sideways, dealing 10% damage and average/low knockback. If it hits on the lower end, they will be knocked upwards 5*, doing 8% damage and low knockback. You must beware of spacing before you try and use this move. It takes Roy 0.8 seconds to go back into his original stance, meaning it is also punishable. Roy also takes more knockback while using this move, as is is pretty OP otherwise.

Aerial Attacks
Neutral Air
Based on the one from Project M, Roy spins his flaming sword around him quickly in almost a complete circle (290*). Has moderate/high range, much hitstun, and almost no start or end lag. Does 6% damage and burns the victim with a fire effect. Great to use in the air if you feel like you cannot hit your foe with any of your attacks.

Side Air
This attack is based around Marth's Side Tilt. Roy swings his sword forward through the space in front of him, performing an arc. Can be done twice in the air after jumping once, and will knock opponents up 55* if it hits in the tip, but will do the most damage and knockback if on the hilt; whereas the lower end will, funnily enough, spike opponents. Average/high landing lag.

Back Air
Similar to Ike, Roy sticks his sword out behind him, being as quick as his Neutral Air but not having much range, and it has a small hitbox. Great for when your foe is behind you and close to you. 8% on the hilt, and 7% on the lower end and the tip.

z

To be continued


 

ChaosKiwi

Smash Apprentice
Joined
Feb 1, 2014
Messages
104
NNID
ChaosKiwi
Hey, this isn't late or anything. In fact, maybe you're the late one, reader. Anyway, time for part two of me and Koolaid Man's set movement thing.

VARRICK


Oh, and Zhu Li too, I guess.


Varrick. Inventor, innovator, philanthropist, shrewd businessman, former terrorist. What more is there to say but... Varrick. This genius is a major player in seasons two and four of Korra, but he's never alone. Always by his side his his humble, reliable, loyal womanservant Zhu Li, a cold, hearltess war machine.

She does most of the grunt work while Varrick, caring boss that he is, "supervises". With a command of "Do the thing!" from Varrick and then a doing of the thing from Zhu Li, these two are unstoppable.

In battle, Varrick sticks to the background, calling out orders in a Pokemon Trainer type role. Meanwhile, Zhu Li does the fighting, riding around in a Mecha Tank, seen below:




STATS
(For Zhu Li in the Mecha Tank)
Size- 10
Weight- 9
Ground Speed- 8
Aerial Speed- 3
Fall Speed- 9
Jumps- 3

(For Zhu Li outside of the Mecha Suit)
Size- 5
Weight- 4
Ground Speed- 6
Aerial Speed- 5
Fall Speed- 4
Jumps- 3


SPECIALS

Side Special- Electrograpple
Zhu Li raises the arm of the tank, and the fist fires out of it, claws outstretched. The fist, should it hit somebody,grabs on, the cable that links it to the suit surging with electricity. This does 10% electrical damage, and has longer than average hitstun, allowing Zhu Li to rush in for a followup attack. However, should the player hold the input after hooking on to a foe, you will reel them in close like a robot fisherman, dealing 6% instead.

You can, additionally, use this to hook on to faraway items, and reel them in for Zhu Li to use.

Down Special- Traction Spike
Zhu Li braces her whole body, as a set of spikes extend from the undersides of the heels of her suit's feet. These, should the suit be grounded at the time, bury themselves in the dirt below, holding the suit in place.

While like this, Zhu Li cannot move on her own, and cannot be moved by enemy attacks, except for grabs. Essentially, they give her super armor, at the cost of all mobility.

While the spikes are extended, however, Zhu Li is still capable of using her other attacks. To retract the spikes and regain movement, just input the down special again. The Spikes automatically retract after 10 seconds.

If used in air, the spikes will jut out before immediately retracting, dealing 10% to anybody they manage to hit in that time and spiking them downward.

Neutral Special- Magnet
The suits hands cling together, palms facing outwards, as visible waves of electromagnetic energy emanate from them, spreading in a space 1.5 Stage Builder Block high and three long, that space becoming a very strong pullbox which Zhu Li can use to bring just out of reach enemies to her.

Normally, when using this move Zhu Li cannot move, or even turn around. However, the Traction Spike alleviates that, as Zhu Li can change the direction of the magnet when anchored, to any angle out of all three hundred and sixty, by angling the stick in that direction! Use this to make up for the lack of mobility, son!

Up Special- Operation Winged Freedom

Zhu Li pulls the eject cord inside her Mecha Tank, and blasts out of the cockpit. If one were to look closely, they'd notice she's wearing some sort of steampunk-y backpack. After a brief delay, wings unfurl from this pack, sending Zhu Li into a glide.

This recovery has good distance, as Zhu Li is fired three Battlefield platforms into the air after ejecting. Additionally, if used in air, the falling Mecha Suit becomes a hitbox, spiking anybody it hits on the way down.

However, once Zhu Li lands, she's without a tank! That's right, she's left to run around on her own for a bit. This is when she's at her most vulnerable, as she's left with these maneuvers:​

  • Glide Attack: Zhu-Li, while gliding, performs a tactical spin attack, dealing 6% and knocking foes downward.
  • Jab: A regular ol' punch, dealing 4% but coming out slow.
  • Side Tilt: A spinning kick, knocking foes upwards and dealing 10%.
  • Up Tilt: A weak uppercut, dealing 8%.
  • Smashes: Zhu Li fires a tazer in the chosen direction, dealing 4% but stunning.
  • Grab: A standard grab.
  • Throws: Every throw is Zhu Li performing a Snake-style neck twist, causing her foe to fall prone.
She will remain in this state until she either returns to the Mecha Tank, should it still be around, or until after eight seconds, at which point a new suit will spawn and she'll climb in, while the old one, if it's still around, disappears. She's got super armor while climbing in to the tank.


STANDARDS

Jab- Piston Punch
Zhu Li sticks out her arm, and a piston in the wrist extends her fist each time the input is pressed. This mid range punch deals 3% per hit, and can hit many times in quick succession.

Side Tilt- Kick//Spin Kick
Zhu Li performs a powerful side kick, dealing 9% on contact with here enemy. Seems fairly straightforward. However, should she be anchored, it becomes a spinning kick, hitting on both sides of Zhu Li and, while having less range, deals 12%!

Up Tilt- Uppercut//Boosted Uppercut
Zhu Li performs an uppercut, venting steam from below to pull her suit into their a bit, increasing the attack's range. This, all in all, deals 10%.

However, should she be anchored, the excess force from the steam venting has nowhere to go, thus adding to the power of the punch. Yes, that's totally how physics works. So, by sacrificing range, she gains attack power, dealing 15% instead.

Down Tilt- Overhead
Zhu Li does balls her fists, and brings them down in an overhead strike, dealing 8% and smacking any foes downwards.

Dash Attack- Tank Boost
The treads on the bottom of the suit's feet start running, speeding up Zhu Li's advance and turning her into a sort of juggernaut, plowing through any foes in her way and dealing 10%, knocking them behind her.


SMASHES

Side Smash- Megaton Punch

Zhu Li brings her fist around for an underarm punch, which comes in to parts. The first, the initial connection of the attack, does no knockback whatsoever and 10% at full charge. The second part, however, comes right after. Immediately after making contact, the player has the chance to input a direction with the stick, either diagonally up/down or straight forward, with straight being the default. After a brief delay, a piston in the wrist causes the fist to jut out at high speed, dealing 14% more damage (no matter the charge) and launching foes in the chosen direction, KOing at 110%.

Down Smash- Optional Chainsaw Attachment (Only ¥29.99!)
A chainsaw extends out of Zhu Li's wrist, and revs up while she charges this smash. Once released, she drags her chainsaw across the ground, starting a little behind her before ending in an uppercut with it. At full charge, this move deals 25% over multiple hits. How that works is, once the chainsaw comes in contact with a foe, Zhu Li stops the movement of her arm entirely, allowing the blade to grind into them, dealing the damage before launching them in whatever direction the arc was heading, KOing them at 90% and allowing Zhu Li to immediately return to battle. However, if she whiffs the attack, she's left standing there for a brief moment while the chainsaw revs down and retracts.

When anchored, this attack changes entirely. Instead of her normal uppercut technique, Zhu Li stabs the chainsaw into the ground below her, spinning in a circle as she does. This seems like a decrease in range, doesn't it? Well, there's a twist. This move hits through thin platforms! That's right, she literally cuts through the ground below her, dealing extra damage! Specifically, any foes hit below her take 30% instead of the usual amount, and are meteor smashed downwards! If hit above ground, however, they take the normal amount of damage and knockback.

Up Smash- Flamethrower

Zhu Li points her left arm upward, tightening her fist to activate a Spider-Man Webshooter like mechanism, only instead of webbing, she fires a stream of super hot flames! The stream extends two thirds of the suit's height upwards, and can be slightly angled to the sides, allowing Zhu Li limited aiming capabilities.

Should an enemy hit the very tip of the flame, they take 20-25%, depending on the charge, in fire damage, and are launched upwards with enough power to KO at 90%. Should they be hit by any other part of the flame, however, they take between 14% and 19%, and get KO'd at around 120%. And again, that's fire damage.


AERIALS

Neutral Aerial- Insert Special Name Here
Zhu Li vents high pressure steam from various ports on her suit, causing her to spin at high speeds. The steam, combined with the spinning, deals 8% of fire damage, the fire representing the heat of Zhu Li's manly spirit steam.

Forward Aerial- Punch Forward, Low Damage, Some Knockback
Admittedly, Varrick didn't build the suit with much aerial capability, so the options are limited. As such, Zhu Li punches forward, for low damage, with some knockback. The low damage in question is 7%.
Up Aerial- Stretch!
Zhu Li stretches her arms upwards and fires her fists, extending the hitboxes to twice that of her suit's height. This launches foes upwards, dealing 10%. It does more knockback when hitting foes from directly below, KOing at 130%.

Back Aerial- Backhand the Thing
Golly gee, what could it be. Zhu Li, yes siree, turns around and backhands anybody who's behind her. A short range, slow move, it's also her most damage heavy aerial, dealing 13% to make up for its lackluster, well, speed and range.

Down Aerial- Spike Spike Spike
Straightening out, Zhu Li extends both traction spikes at once, spiking anybody she hits and dealing 12% damage.


GRAB GAME

Grab- Grab the Thing!
A simple grab, nothing to see here. When anchored, the grab's range is farther than normal. Once grabbed, she holds the foe slightly off the ground.

Pummel- Smash the Thing!
Zhu Li slams her foe face first into the ground, dealing 5% with each pummel.

Up Throw- Chuck the Thing!
A simple upwards throw, all things considered. Zhu Li throws her enemy straight up, and fires her grappling fist at them, sending them up even farther. Overall they take 14%.


Back Throw- Suplex the Thing!
The name here seems to be quite indicative of what this throw does. That is to say, Zhu Li suplexes the captive, smashing them headfirst into the ground behind her, dealing 12% and causing them to fall prone.

Forward Throw- Spike Kick the Thing!
Zhu Li places the heel of her foot on the victim's chest, and releases her traction spike, sending them flying and dealing 12%.

Down Throw- Elbow Drop the Thing!
It isliterally as rad as it sounds. Zhu Li elbow drops the enemy while in her robot suit, turning her in to some kind of steampunk wrestler or something. This deals 14%.


FINAL SMASH
HUMMINGBIRD SUIT

Varrick jumps off-stage... only to fly back in piloting a hummingbird suit! Zhu Li jumps into it, leaving her old suit behind. For the next fifteen seconds, the duo has free flight, and two moves. B releases a flamethrower with the length of 1/3 Battlefield, dealing 10% per second of contact. A is a corkscrew, sending the suit jetting forward, dealing 15% on contact and high knockback. Once time is up, Zhu Li returns to her suit, and Varrick comedicly crashes.​
 
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Rychu

Thane of Smashville
Joined
Jul 5, 2010
Messages
772
Location
Vincennes, Indiana
3DS FC
1908-0105-4965
Sokka

Sokka is a non-bender warrior in a world full of superhumans who can control the elements and one of Aang's best friends in Avatar: The Last Airbender. Despite his inability to bend, Sokka was the master strategist of Aang's group, his childish humor not doing justice to his (usually unrecognized by others) creative intelligence. He also has a knack for invention, helping create several steam-punk machines almost immediately after discovering a need for them. Sokka was able to hold his own against non-benders and benders alike with the aid of his trusty boomerang and his custom-made sword he built from the "space-earth" he found in a meteorite.

Statistics
Size - 6
Ground Speed - 7
Weight - 6
Jump - 5
Aerial Speed - 3
Fall Speed - 7


Special Attacks
Neutral Special
Sokka tosses his trusty Boomerang forward, with the occasional shout of it's name, Boomerang, which flies at about the speed of one of Mega Man's Metal Blades. Also like Metal Blade, by holding one of the 8 cardinal directions after inputting the attack. Boomerang has a pretty long range as well, reaching about 1 and 1/2 times the distance that Link's Boomerang does. Unlike Link's, Sokka's Boomerang will always find it's way back to him, even if he moves from the spot he was standing in when Boomerang was thrown, catching it with a wide grin. Should Boomerang hit a wall or platform along it's journey (solid that is, it can pass through fall-through platforms), it will simply bounce off and find it's way back to Sokka.

Should Boomerang hit an opponent on it's journey, it will immediately turn around (obviously, this was as Sokka intended), hooking them in, and dragging them back towards Sokka via small amounts of knockack, dealing tiny hits of 1% damage per second. The knockback is just so that a quick opponent should be able to DI out of the path after a few hits, but it's enough that they've already been brought towards Sokka, who's most likely going to be rushing the hooked opponent immediately after they've been snagged.

Side Special
Sokka closes his eyes, gives a somewhat girlish scream, and pushes his hands forward, even dashing a bit forward with it. This move, for all of it's somewhat hilarious femininity, is really quite useful, basically passing through attacks (think Little Mac's Side Special) as Sokka gives a desperate push, though he'll still take a bit of damage from any attack that hits him. Should he make contact with the opponent, they'll be shoved back with pretty excellent horizontal knockback and even a bit of damage, around 5%.
Naturally, Sokka can use this to push away his (presumably much stronger) opponents and get some breathing room, but another big plus to this attack is that it has zero starting lag, allowing Sokka to use it immediately after any other attack, letting him push opponents away before they can punish him or counter-attack! The ending lag isn't terrible either, though it's enough to be punished for if he misses.

Down Special
Sokka hurriedly whips his sword from it's scabbard, holding it in front of him, closing his eyes and presumably praying to the avatar spirit. While this has about the same properties as a counter, at least in this phase of the attack, while not actually being a counter. Opponents will clash with this attack regardless of the attack that they unleashed, and will be pushed back a bit, in typical clash fashion, with the slight delay in the ability to attack again that comes with the clash.

Sokka, on the other hand, thrilled with his ability to block the opponent's ravage attack, is able to move the exact moment the clash occurs, which is signaled with a loud, satisfied, "clang!". Sokka can poke at the opponent with some of his other attacks, push his opponents away with his Side Special, or use his surprisingly effective movement options to get the heck out of there in a moment's notice! Speaking of movement options...


Up Special
One of Sokka's big accomplishments during the series was the creation of this little invention! A small hot air balloon appears above his head (with the Water Tribe insignia on it, of course!), and Sokka grabs on. This recovery works quite a bit like R.O.B's (in Sm4sh), with Sokka able to pull on a second lever in order to continue raising in the air by pressing up on the control stick. This recovery has absolutely amazing mobility, and a pretty great range as far as recovering from offstage.

Sokka doesn't even go into freefall when he lets go of the balloon at the end of the attack, able to use any of his aerial attacks as he falls back to the stage. Sokka can jump off the balloon at any time by using the jump button (obviously) essentially meaning that his recovery gives him a third jump. Unfortunately, the Balloon can be popped, having only 10% stamina, which will cause Sokka to go into helpless if he's still holding onto it. Luckily, if Sokka is directly under a foe when he lets go, the foe will land on the now quickly-rising balloon, and, if the balloon is high and close enough to the blast zone, will carry them off! If Sokka wants to simply release a balloon from the ground, all he need do is press down immediately after the balloon spawns, and up it floats fast enough to get to the top blast zone on Final Destination in just under 2 seconds!


Standard Attacks
Jab
Sokka grabs his sword, and, in true warrior fashion, begins erratically swinging it in broad strokes as the jab button is held, resembling a certain Knight in terms of it's hitboxes and range. This attack deals small hits of 1% damage and lightly hitstuns opponents, continuously dealing damage, though it eventually stalls out after a few seconds. The final hit of this attack, once the jab button is released, is a huge slash that deals 7% damage, which knocks opponents away at a lightly upwards angle, though not so strong as to suggest that Sokka cannot follow up on it.

Forward Tilt
Sokka once again reaches for his comet-mineral-sword, unsheathes it, and in one smooth motion, thrusts it forward, lunging, propelling himself forward a bit. This all happens extremely quickly, almost as fast as his jab. Sokka can use this attack several times in a row, turning the smooth motion of the first hit into a sort of goofy stagger forward with each sword thrust.

The consecutive hits following the first come out even faster than the initial one, thanks to Sokka not having to unsheathe it. This attack has about the range of Marth's Neutral Attack, and is great at annoying poking. It only deals about
8% damage, which gets weaker by 2% every hit, though he's almost guaranteed to hit multiple times since the knockback is a small poke backwards even at the highest percents. "Poke" is a good term for the attack, as it's a wonderful tool to poke in and get quick damage before getting away. It's also a great way to follow up on the boomerang pulling opponents right into you.

Up Tilt
Speaking of poking, that's pretty much exactly what Sokka does when he attacks up. Clutching his sword, he thrusts it straight upward, and straight upward it does poke - should a foe be above Sokka and hit with this attack, they'll be juggled upwards lightly. Lightly enough that, at low percents, Sokka will undoubtedly be able to knock off a few uses of this attack on his aerial foe. The poke itself does 10% damage, but won't be KOing any time soon.

Down Tilt
Sokka, from his crouch, does a frog-like swimming motion, propelling himself 2.5 Stage Builder Blocks across the ground, sliding like a penguin. Any opponent he comes into contact with is dealt 9% damage and weak upwards knockback, making this a good approaching tool thanks to it's low lag and high speed. Opponents can regularly expect to see Sokka sliding across the stage like this as a means of quick, safe motion, especially against the opponents who like their projectiles.

Dash Attack
Sokka, as he dashes, trips over his own feet, even though he desperately attempts to make it look cool. As such, he ends up sliding on his side for about a BFP, Boomerang pointed outwards, dealing 7% damage and light knockback backwards. Sokka, being quite athletic, is able to tumble his way back onto his feel right after hitting the opponent, able to immediately follow up on his obviously planned attack that he meant to do.

Aerial Attacks
Neutral Aerial
Sokka, realizing how high he is in the air without Appa or his balloon, does what any thinking man would do in this situation: flail like a madman. Sokka's entire body is a hitbox during this attack, dealing multiple hits of 1% damage, resembling Mewtwo's Project M Nair. Sokka can somewhat control his aerial momentum during this attack, allowing him to somewhat kind of chase after opponents in the air while using this attack.

Down Aerial
Sokka looks down, sticking his tongue out, and slams his boomerang downwards. Boomerang travels about as far as Megaman's Hard Knuckle before returning to Sokka, and effects foes in pretty much the same way: opponents are dealt 12% damage and are spiked downwards, making this an awesome gimping tool for Sokka, or simply a way to get a chasing opponent out of his face. Sokka's probably going to want to balloon his way out of a situation like this!

Forward Aerial
Sokka starts making swimming motions in the air, frantically trying to gain some kind of control, actually getting a little bit of forward momentum out of it, though it's fairly small and Sokka continues downwards even if he moves forwards. Opponents who are hit are dealt 7% damage and very light horizontal knockback...right into where Sokka could hit them again!

Sokka can string together several quick hits with his strange technique, similarly to his Forward Tilt (and similarly decaying the damage done by each consecutive attack as well), and players can watch as Sokka juggles midair opponents with a frantic swim move. Right off the side of the stage, too, if he's close enough, though a smart opponent could attack him and avoid this move, thanks to it's somewhat narrow hitbox. Still, it's a great way for Sokka to get a string of attacks together in mid-air.
Up Aerial
Sokka takes his moon sword and stabs straight upwards, copying Smash's greatest swordsman's Up Aerial, down to how long he keeps the sword in this stabbing position... hey, isn't imitation the greatest form of flattery? The lingering sword hitbox deals 13% damage and upwards knockback, perhaps allowing Sokka to get the opponent on top of that balloon to be carried off the edge of the blast zone!

Back Aerial
Sokka turns his body, taking a kung-fu pose, kicking backwards. The motion is quite quick, happening almost instantly, and thanks to Sokka's lankiness has a bit of range to it. Opponents hit with his sweet kick move are dealt 11% damage and downwards diagonal knockback.

Smash Attacks
Down Smash
Sokka gets an idea, shown by the exclamation mark he gets over his head and also the extremely smug expression on his face, pulling his Boomerang upwards, like a golf club. Sokka then digs Boomerang into the ground on either side of him, pulling up some dirt, pitfalling opponents on either side of him, in addition to dealing 10-25% damage, depending on charge. Also depending on charge is the amount of time the pitfalls remain on the stage as a trap for Sokka's opponents - between 3 and 7 seconds, also depending on charge. Sokka's not the world's greatest fighter, he'd be the first to admit - but that won't stop him from outsmarting his foes!

Forward Smash
Sokka unsheathes his sword, holding it, ready to strike, as the attack charges in power. Upon release, Sokka unleashes a single, powerful slash, visibly cutting through the air with a giant swing, hitting from just above him all the way to the ground. Once the attack is complete, Sokka smirks, sheathing the sword once again. This is by far Sokka's most powerful attack, along with his Up Smash, dealing 20-40% damage and knockback that, depending on charge, will KO anywhere from 100 to 75%. Yeah, it's got some power behind it, and it's even quite quick at the beginning, but it's got some extremely heavy ending lag, as Sokka can't help but to smugly congratulate himself with a "cool" sheathing of the sword, leaving him quite open to counter attack. Nevertheless, this is a huge move for Sokka, pretty much his only reliable KO move.

Up Smash
Sokka grabs his sword, spreads his feet, and concentrates his attention at the sky above him, tensing his muscles as he readies himself to unleash his attack. Upon release, Sokka slashes in a large arc above him, hitting on all sides but most heavily upwards, in an extremely fast movement. The attack deals heavy damage, 18 -38% damage depending on charge, and Upwards knockback that KOs from 110 to 80% damage.

While the damage will remain the same regardless of the position of the foe, the heavy knockback will only occur if foes are above him, as foes hit by the rather large side hitboxes are only knocked upwards slightly. They're knocked out of the range of the smash, which is quite quick and obviously powerful, though with the minimal lag on Sokka's end, he'll be quite able to follow up on the attack.


Grab Game
Grab and Pummel
Sokka, gripping Boomerang, swing it forward, hoping to snag any opponent within the longer-than average reach of this grab. Of course, should Boomerang already be out snagging someone, Sokka doesn't have the same boost, reverting to his slightly shorter-than-average range. Then again, using Boomerang is a great way to bring foes in close for a grab anyways, so the difference is pretty much split. In either case, Sokka holds the foe by the scruff of their collars, glaring directly into their eyes, and shakes them quite violently for his pummel, dealing 2% every press of the button.

Up Throw
Sokka, still firmly gripping the opponent, does a little spin before launching the opponent upwards with a mighty throw, dealing them 10% damage and (obviously) upwards knockback that'll KO at around 115%. Of course, Sokka can speed up that whole "KO" process by releasing one of his hot air balloons upwards, which, helpfully, will carry opponents up, up, and away! Assuming they're high enough to get carried off without jumping off first, that is.

Forward Throw
Holding the opponent up a bit, Sokka lifts his leg, preparing a giant punt. He does just that to the opponent, kicking them quite hard, sending them flying forward... just an BFP in front of him. Hey, it's impressive that they even got that far from a punt! The knockback is set, never changing, along with the damage - which, at the very least, is a rather impressive 15% damage. The lag is also quite short, allowing Sokka to chase after his kicked foe!

Back Throw
Sokka rolls onto his back, foe in tow, curling his feet under the opponent's body. When he completes the roll, he kicks his opponents away, dealing quite minor damage, only around 8%, but heavy knockback backwards, enough to KO at around 130%.

Down Throw
Sokka throws his opponents up a bit, grabbing their feet, and begins spinning them rapidly around, dealing several hits of 2% damage, before releasing them, throwing them...a few feet in front of him. Sokka's not superhuman after all! The distance the opponents are thrown is quite within the range of several of his attacks, and they are thrown along the ground, allowing Sokka to toss them into whatever trap may be on the stage.

Final Smash
Sokka Surprise!
Sokka pulls his sword from it's hilt, giving a big yell, and begins, quite masterfully, flailing it around, along with a continued yell. The final smash essentially gives Sokka an even more powerful version of the Hammer item, in which Sokka retains his normal movement abilities, including his double jump. When Sokka comes into contact with an opponent, they are immediately dealt 35% damage and massive knockback upwards, KOing at as low as 60%. Sokka continues this frantic swordplay for all of 10 seconds before he tires out, and the final smash ends.
 
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