Q&A Smash Ultimate Q&A thread

Pikopiko

Smash Rookie
Joined
Mar 6, 2019
Messages
12
Thanks for everyone's help so far!

I was wondering if anyone had any advice. What is the best way to execute a forward tilt attack? I either perform a forward smash or dash attack and can't seem to get the timing right for a forward tilt. I am using Lucina. I am hoping to not have to remap the buttons on the controller because I like have the separate button for the smash attack.

Any advice?
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2019
Messages
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Ok so I need help, and I have tried YouTube, I have tried googling, and now I am desperate enough to make an account real quick and try here. But I need help with the Lucina challenge in adventure mode. Thing is, I have no idea what battle I have yet to win, is I have done them all (or so I thought. I got the True ending and fought everyone I came across. Even went back to ones I had to skip like some of the 4 stars)

Nevermind, I just found out how to get rid of the obstacles
 
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ToasterBrains

RamenBrains
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ToasterBrains
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What are some good ways to avoid just "pushing buttons," as the good players say, and improve my general mindfulness/awareness while playing?
This is something I've struggled with in the past and still do whenever I pick the game back up- but it all comes down to practice (I know, I know, that's kind of a not great answer).
But seriously- mindfulness in anything gets better with practice. In order to be able to focus on what your hands are doing and how they make your character react (instead of mashing A and hoping something hits) is to maybe practice mindfulness separate from Smash Brothers.

If you really don't want to do any mindful exercises, you can try and start playing easy CPU matches while working on how attentive you are to your hands.
 

JiggyNinja

Smash Apprentice
Joined
Dec 14, 2018
Messages
133
What are some good ways to avoid just "pushing buttons," as the good players say, and improve my general mindfulness/awareness while playing?
You just have to stop "pushing buttons" and shift your mode of thinking to deciding what attack you want to use, and executing that attack. Practice against weak CPUs first, because this shift will make you play worse at first. You can't practice properly if you feel pressured to win. Don't even worry so much about using the right move for the situation, worry the most about executing the move you decide to use.

So you'll start thinking about things like this "short hop nair, then dash attack, then fair, another fair, f tilt, run off the ledge and dair".

Is that string of attacks actually good to do? I don't know, but that's not important right now. You need to get used to making deliberate decisions and properly executing those decisions. Don't worry yet about how good those decisions are, you need the proper foundation for that first. If you can't even execute your current bad plans properly (or even come up with a plan in the first place), you have no chance of being able to develop and execute good plans.
Thanks for everyone's help so far!

I was wondering if anyone had any advice. What is the best way to execute a forward tilt attack? I either perform a forward smash or dash attack and can't seem to get the timing right for a forward tilt. I am using Lucina. I am hoping to not have to remap the buttons on the controller because I like have the separate button for the smash attack.

Any advice?
If you refuse to switch to tilt stick, practice practice practice practice. Get in vs mode with a low level CPU and wail on it using as many tilts as you can. Stick them in the middle of other strings, like maybe dash attack -> up tilt if they jump over your dash. Or some sh nairs mixed with d tilts for poking. Slowly crank up the difficulty so that you can get used to this input discipline under pressure. My stick movements get a lot faster when I'm under pressure so it's harder to avoid smashing/dashing. That's why I switched to tilt stick.
 

Legg0

Smash Rookie
Joined
Mar 16, 2019
Messages
1
I've got some questions.

I have experience with plenty of other fighters but new to smash and trying to wrap my head around a few things.

I understand frame data well but I'm trying to understand how frame advantage works in this game compared to other games. I notice I don't see a lot of resources on the +/- of situations but that's probably because there are many variables. But if anyone could try and help me understand a little more that would be much appreciated.

Say a dash attack is blocked.. How can I find out the frame advantage of the situation? Do active frames play a roll in this and will hitting the dash attack late change the frame data?

Say an aerial attack is blocked.. Same questions.. Does jump height and when it hits play a roll? Are blocked jump attacks in the shield or attackers advantage? (As a general rule because I'm sure every attack is different)

I know I can just go test the situations, count frames, and find my punishes but I would like to have a general idea of how the mechanics in this game work.
 

MNaumov

Smash Apprentice
Joined
Jan 30, 2019
Messages
163
Location
SE USA
Switch FC
SW-2582-1162-1537
What are some good ways to avoid just "pushing buttons," as the good players say, and improve my general mindfulness/awareness while playing?
Start paying attention to everything your opponent does and download it mentally. As the match starts (esp with someone you've never played) just go for your safest options with whatever character you use in neutral and just.. watch. You can play optimally and rely on general strategies to get you through a few rounds of neutral and maybe into an advantage state or out of a disadv state.. maybe even take a stock.. or get your stock taken. Through this, think about all the things the person has done and begin to deduce what kind of game they're going for. Are they just going for true / bread and butter combos as follow ups when landing a stray hit in neutral, or are they maybe trying to play in a reactionary way, only extending themselves when YOU make decisions / act? Are they just running to the side of the stage and spamming the B button? If you get to a point where you REALLY feel like you know a player, you can start going for hard-reads to punish bad decisions with moves that you'd otherwise have no business landing.

Once you boil down a player's habits, it becomes very easy to know what you should be doing.. provided you have a good understanding of your character and have gotten a good feel of said character through labbing out time and blood in training mode, preferably with a human being DIing. It's fairly straight-forward to learn what works as a potential option for x, y and z through labbing out stuff in training, but knowing what to do with all of that stuff when in real games playing through neutral is another thing. Learning to read habits and figure a player out plays a big part in knowing WHEN to go in and start trying all that stuff you've spent time grinding in training. Once you start doing this in real matches, you'll get better and better at it.

Other basic stuff would include intimately knowing how to space your moves, and how to be able to get into position via good movement to use certain moves when in certain situations where it's a good idea. For example, on a character like Cloud you have a fat BAir that's quite easy to land, has a hitbox the size of a house and kills pretty well to boot. BAir, obviously comes out behind you, so learning techniques such as the RAR (Reverse Aerial Rush) and getting good at quick turnarounds at rest are crucial to being able to incorporate moves into your play.

It's a mix of being able to read habits and play through neutral, being able to rely on your experience and execution skills once you've won neutral to take stocks, knowing how to use movement and quick thinking to position yourself well and just generally being quick on the draw with your inputs so to speak. Every attack you input should have a clear and defined purpose going in, you should always keep a good reason for doing something.. especially if it's an option that forces more of a commitment out of you.

It's a journey that never ends, really.
 
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