Staying Healthy - A Guide to Playing Melee Better and Longer

Joined
May 23, 2006
Messages
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Location
Henderson, NV
#1
I don't think Smashers, or video game players in general, put much effort or thought into their health, so I created this thread. And since Melee is the most technically demanding of the Smash games, I posted it here.

The purpose of this thread is to provide a hub of information for and ways to be and stay healthy, as it concerns the tournament-attending Smasher.

General Tips
The healthier the body, the better the mind will think and the hands will perform.
  • Exercise (Check out the SWF Gym thread to get in contact with other Smashers who want to be fit)
  • Eat healthy
  • Stay hydrated
  • Get sleep
  • Stay clean
Hand Health
Being able to perform the needed and wanted commands on our controllers and pushing the limits of what can be done - and preventing problems with or injuries to our hands - rests on how we treat our hands.

  • Here are some basic warm-ups, stretches, and strengthening exercises - complete with descriptions and gifs (courtesy of Ergocise):
    • Warm-ups
      For before and during matches; before stretching and strengthening exercises.
      [*]Handshake

      Sit in neutral position. Raise your hands and forearms in front of your chest. Inhale. Exhale and shake your hands from the wrist, as though you are shaking water off of your hands. Shake for ten seconds, continuing to breathe. Relax your arms by your sides. Repeat. This ergocise increases circulation in wrists, hands and arms, relieves the stress and tension of computer work, and helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Standing Handshake

      Stand in neutral position, letting your arms hand at your sides. Inhale. Exhale and shake your hands from the wrist, letting your whole arm, wrist and hand move freely. Shake for five seconds, continuing to breathe. Relax your arms by your sides. Repeat five times.
      This ergocise increases circulation in wrists, hands and arms, relieves the stress and tension of computer work, and helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Thumb Sweep

      Sit in neutral position. Place your forearms on your armrests, palms facing up. Point each thumb out to the side. Inhale. Exhale and sweep your thumb across your palm towards your pinkie finger. Sweep your thumb back out to the side. Repeat ten times with both hands.
      This ergocise increases circulation in thumb and hand, helps prevent DeQuervain's Disease.

      Abracadabra

      Sit in neutral position. Place your forearms on your armrests with your hands extending past the armrests, palms facing down. Inhale. Exhale and slowly close your hands into a loose fist. Slowly open your hands. Repeat ten times, continuing to breathe.
      This ergocise increases circulation in hands and wrists, relieves tension and stress in hands and wrists, helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Cuticle Check

      Sit in neutral position. Place your forearms on your armrests and let your hands hang down over the edge of the armrests. Inhale. Exhale and slowly lift your hands up as far as they will comfortably go. Inhale. Exhale and slowly lower your hands down as far as they will comfortably go. Repeat ten times in each direction, continuing to breathe.
      This ergocise increases circulation in hands, relieves tension and stress in wrists and hands, flushes out waste products from the carpal tunnel region and the hand, and helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Wrist Circles

      Sit in neutral position with your arms resting on your armrests. Slide your forearms forward slightly and make loose fists with both hands. Inhale. Exhale and slowly rotate both wrists outwards, letting your forearms follow the movement. Rotate outwards ten times, continuing to breathe. Keeping your hands in loose fists, rotate inwards ten times, continuing to breathe. You should feel a slight stretch in your wrists during the rotations. Increase the range of the circles slightly if you don't feel a stretch.
      This ergocise stretches the wrist muscles, increases circulation in wrists, and helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Double Wrist Circles

      Sit in neutral position. Clasp your hands in front of you, interlacing your fingers. Inhale. Exhale and rotate your wrists clockwise. Repeat ten times, continuing to breathe. Repeat ten times counterclockwise.
      This ergocise stretches the wrists, increases circulation in wrists, and helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Finger Cascade Out

      Sit in neutral position with your arms resting on your armrests. Turn your palms upwards. Inhale. Exhale and, starting with your pinkie finger, slowly fold each finger into your palm in this order: pinkie, ring, middle and forefinger. Inhale. Exhale and slowly unfold each finger, going in the reverse order: forefinger, middle, ring, pinkie. You may not be able to articulate each finger fully independent from the others. Don't worry about that, just concentrate on trying to move each finger. Repeat five times both folding and unfolding the fingers.
      This ergocise stretches the finger and wrist muscles, increases circulation in hands and wrists, helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Finger Cascade In

      Sit in neutral position with your arms resting on your armrests. Turn your palms upwards. Inhale. Exhale and, starting with your forefinger, slowly fold each finger into your palm in this order: forefinger, middle, ring, pinkie. Inhale. Exhale and slowly unfold each finger, going in the reverse order: pinkie, ring, middle, forefinger. You may not be able to articulate each finger fully independent from the others. Don't worry about that, just concentrate on trying to move each finger. Repeat five times both folding and unfolding the fingers.
      This ergocise stretches the finger and wrist muscles, increases circulation in hands and wrists, helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Finger Circles

      Sit in neutral position. Hold your right index finger with your left hand. Inhale. Exhale and rotate your right index finger clockwise five times. Inhale. Exhale and rotate your right index finger counterclockwise five times. Repeat with each finger and with your thumb. Repeat with the fingers and thumb of your left hand.
      This ergocise stretches the fingers and increases circulation in the fingers and hands.

      Finger Pull

      Sit in neutral position. Inhale. Exhale. With your left hand, gently pull your right index finger, holding it for about three seconds. Repeat with each finger and with your thumb. Repeat with the fingers and thumb of your left hand.
      This ergocise stretches the fingers and increases circulation in the fingers and hands.
    • Stretches
      For before, during, and, especially, after matches; before and after strengthening exercises.
      Break at the Wrist

      Sit in neutral position. Extend your right arm in front of you at shoulder height, palm down. Bend your right wrist down, fingers pointing toward the floor. Inhale. Exhale. Using your left hand, gently push the fingers of your right hand towards you, bending your wrist slightly further. Hold for ten seconds, continuing to breathe. Repeat five times. Repeat five times with your left arm, assisting with your right hand.
      This ergocise stretches the wrist extensors and finger extensors (muscles at the top of wrist), which work during typing or using a mouse, increases circulation in wrists and hands, reduces the stress placed on wrists from working at a computer, and helps prevent Tennis Elbow and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Twiddle Dee Dee

      Sit in neutral position. Place your arms on your armrests and interlace your fingers. Inhale. Exhale and twiddle your thumbs forward ten times. Inhale. Exhale and twiddle your thumbs backward ten times. Release your hands and let them hand at your sides for a few seconds.
      This ergocise increases circulation in thumb and helps prevent DeQuervain's Disease.

      Hammer Nail

      Sit in neutral position. Place your forearms on your armrests. Point your thumbs toward the ceiling and make a fist with each hand. Tuck your thumbs into your fists, holding them firmly. Inhale. Exhale and tilt your wrists forward and away from you as though you are hammering a nail. Hold for ten seconds in forward position, continuing to breathe. Repeat five times.
      This ergocise stretches the thumb extensors and abductors (tendons that run from your wrist along the top of your thumb and helps prevent DeQuervain's Disease.

      Stop! (In the Name of Love)

      Sit in neutral position. Straighten your right arm in front of you at shoulder height, palm down. Bend your right wrist back, fingers pointing to the ceiling. Inhale. Exhale and, with your left hand, gently pull back your right fingers, stretching your wrist. Hold for ten seconds, continuing to breathe. Repeat five times. Repeat five times with your left wrist, assisting with your right hand.
      This ergocise stretches the wrist flexors and finger flexors (muscles that run through the carpal tunnel and insert into the palm), increases circulation in wrists and hands, and helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Underhanded Stretch

      Sit in neutral position. Straighten your right arm in front of you at shoulder height, palm up. Bend your right wrist down, fingers pointing to the floor. Inhale. Exhale and, with your left hand, gently push your right fingers toward you, stretching your wrist. Hold for ten seconds, continuing to breathe. Repeat five times. Repeat five times with your left wrist, assisting with your right hand.
      This ergocise stretches the wrist flexors and finger flexors (muscles that run through the carpal tunnel and insert into the palm), increases circulation in wrists and hands, and helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      The Block

      Sit in neutral position, at least arms length away from your monitor. Interlace your fingers in your lap. Inhale. Exhale and push your hands out to shoulder level, turning your palms away from you. Straighten your elbows. Hold for ten seconds, continuing to breathe. Inhale and lower your hands to your lap, turning them in. Repeat five times.
      This ergocise stretches the wrist flexors and finger flexors (muscles that run through the carpal tunnel and insert into the palm), increases circulation in wrists and hands, and helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Open Handed Stretch Up

      Sit in neutral position with your hands on your thighs, palms up. Inhale. Exhale and open your hands as wide as possible. Hold for five seconds. Slowly close your hands into loose fists. Repeat five times, continuing to breathe.
      This ergocise stretches the muscles of the palms and fingers, increases circulation in hands, helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Open Handed Stretch Down

      Sit in neutral position with your hands on your thighs, palms down. Inhale. Exhale and open your hands as wide as possible. Hold for five seconds. Slowly close your hands into loose fists. Repeat five times, continuing to breathe.
      This ergocise stretches the muscles of the palms and fingers, increases circulation in hands, helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Wrist Grab

      Sit in neutral position. Extend your right hand to shoulder level, palm facing the ceiling. With your left hand, reach under your forearm and hold your right thumb and palm. Inhale. Exhale and slowly turn your right wrist and forearm out and down with your left hand until you feel a mild stretch. Hold for fifteen seconds, continuing to breathe. Repeat with your left arm, assisting with your right hand.
      This ergocise stretches the wrists and forearms, increases circulation in wrists and forearms.

      Horse Rider Out

      Sit in neutral position. Extend your arms to shoulder level, hands in loose fists, palms down. Inhale. Exhale and slowly turn your wrists out until your feel a slight stretch in your wrists, keeping the tops of your hands facing the ceiling.
      This ergocise stretches the wrists and forearms, increases circulation in wrists and forearms, helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Horse Rider In

      Sit in neutral position. Extend your arms to shoulder level, hands in loose fists, palms up. Inhale. Exhale and slowly turn your wrists in until your feel a slight stretch in your wrists, keeping the tops of your hands facing the ceiling.
      This ergocise stretches the wrists and forearms, increases circulation in wrists and forearms, helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Like A Prayer

      Sit in neutral position. Place your hands together, palm to palm at chest height. Inhale. Exhale and press your hands together, moving them downward towards your belly button until you feel a mild stretch. Hold for fifteen seconds, continuing to breathe. Repeat.
      This ergocise stretches wrists, forearms and hands, increases circulation in wrists, forearms and hands, helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Hands Down

      Sit in neutral position. Place your hands together, palm to palm at chest height. Inhale. Exhale and press your hands together, moving them downward towards your belly button until you feel a mild stretch. Rotate your palms until your fingertips point towards the floor. Don't worry if your wrists won't rotate all the way down, just go as far as you feel comfortable. Hold for fifteen seconds, continuing to breathe. Repeat.
      This ergocise stretches wrists, forearms and hands, increases circulation in wrists, forearms and hands, helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

      Hand Push

      Sit in neutral position. Place your hands together, palm to palm at chest height. Inhale. Exhale and push your right palm against your left palm until you feel a mild stretch. Hold for fifteen seconds, continuing to breathe. Release your right palm. Repeat, pushing your left palm against your right palm.
      This ergocise stretches the wrists, forearms and hands, increases circulation in wrists, forearms and hands, helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.
    • Strengthening
      For before/after tournaments and smashfests; after warm-ups and stretches. (Too much before a tournament/smashfest can make your hands less reactive, just fyi)
      Thumb Push

      Sit in neutral position. Place your forearms on your armrests. Make a fist with your right hand. Point your right thumb toward the ceiling. Inhale. Exhale and gently pull back on your right thumb with your left hand. Resist and don't let your right thumb move. Hold for five seconds, continuing to breathe. Repeat ten times. Repeat ten times with your left thumb, assisting with your right hand.
      This ergocise strengthens the thumb adductors and flexors (muscles that run along the inside of your thumb) and helps prevent DeQuervain's Disease.

      Thumb Pull

      Sit in neutral position. Place your forearms on your armrests. Make a fist with your right hand. Point your right thumb toward the ceiling. Inhale. Exhale and gently push forward on your right thumb using your left hand. Resist and don't let your right thumb move. Hold for five seconds, continuing to breathe. Repeat ten times. Repeat ten times with your left thumb, assisting with your right hand.
      This ergocise strengthens the thumb adductors and flexors (muscles that run along the inside of your thumb) and helps prevent DeQuervain's Disease.


      These can also be done with each finger and wrist.
  • In addition to these basic exercises, it's obvious that warming-up your hands with the game is important as well.
    What to do to warm up in Melee varies from person to person and situation to situation - dependent on what character you play, your playstyle, how long ago the last time you played was, weather, etc. The important thing to focus on is making sure that your hands feel comfortable performing the commands you want (and can) do. [Warming up before every set is good since it gets your hands ready, sets a frame for competitiveness (preparing your mind), and helps you get used to the TV you're playing on]​
  • Do other hand intensive hobbies like playing a musical instrument and juggling, or find hand exercising devices like the FiddleLINK, Gripmaster, Chinese Therapy Balls, and your basic stress ball. Also, I recommend checking out HandHealth to find a bunch of (professional) info and products to keep your hands healthy.
  • You can mitigate a lot of the stress on your hands from using the Gamecube controller by checking out this legit post by @SpiderMad : here
Eye Health
Staring at a TV for long periods of time can be strenuous. Preparing for this, and having ways to ease the demand on your eyes is essential to staying at the top of your game.

  • Take breaks from staring at TVs, go outside and get some sunlight.
  • Try not to play on TVs with glare, super high/low contrast, and/or with too much hue of a single color.
  • Play in a well-lit area (most likely will be dependent on TO and venue, but controllable for training and smashfests)
  • Do eye warm-up, stretching, and strengthening exercises (again, from Ergocise).
    Warm-up: Dozer

    Sit in neutral position. Inhale. Exhale and let your eyes close gently. Keep your eyes closed for ten seconds, continuing to breathe. Open your eyes. Repeat.
    This ergocise relaxes and moistens the eyes, helps prevent eye fatigue.

    Good for before/in between/after matches, after you've been KO'd, or any other time you don't need to look at a tv.


    Stretches

    Upstairs, Downstairs

    Sit in neutral position. Inhale. Exhale. Keeping your head still, raise your eyes upwards and focus on something in that line of vision. Hold for a couple of seconds. Drop your eyes down, focusing on something in that line of vision. Repeat.
    This ergocise stretches the muscles of the eyes, increases circulation and helps prevent eye fatigue.

    King Leer

    Sit in neutral position. Inhale. Exhale. Keeping your head still, move your eyes to the right, focusing on something in that line of vision. Hold for a couple of seconds. Move your eyes to the left, focusing on something in that line of vision. Repeat.
    This ergocise stretches the muscles of the eyes, increases circulation and helps prevent eye fatigue.

    Sidewatcher

    Sit in neutral position. Inhale. Exhale. Keeping your head still, move your eyes to the upper right hand diagonal corner. Hold for a couple of seconds. Lower your eyes to the lower left hand diagonal corner. Close your eyes briefly. Repeat, going to the upper left hand diagonal corner and then to the lower right hand diagonal corner.
    This ergocise stretches the muscles of the eyes, increases circulation and helps prevent eye fatigue.

    - Another good stretch is alternating rolling your eyes clockwise and counterclockwise a few times.

    Stretches are good for before and after matches.


    Strengthening - Near, Far

    Sit in neutral position, facing a window or something far away. Inhale. Exhale. Focus your eyes on something close to you, such as your computer screen or your desk. Focus on something far away from you, such as the horizon or a person across the room.
    This ergocise strengthens and relaxes the muscles of the eye and helps prevent eye fatigue.

    You can do this in between sets when you have down time. Especially if you can go outside and get some sunlight into your eyes and focus on things at a greater distance.


    There's also an About.com article on eye exercises:
    http://altmedicine.about.com/cs/illnesswellness/a/EyeExercise1.htm

    Do you spend your days staring at a computer screen? If you do, you probably know how draining and tiring it can be to your entire body, not just your eyes.

    Here is information about one natural approach, which is essentially "yoga for the eyes". The rationale is that natural state of the body is to be at peace, but when we read to understand and learn new information, the mind becomes tense and tries to catch hold. This strains the entire body, including the eyes, leaving people feeling drained even though they haven't physically exerted themselves.

    The key to doing these exercises is to relax and empty the mind as if you are meditating.

    Improving Visual Concentration
    The first step is to strengthen visual concentration. Sit comfortably with your back and neck straight but not stiff. Start by holding each posture for a few minutes and gradually increase.

    1. Focus your gaze on the tip of your nose without blinking. Remain like this for as long as you can. Then close your eyes and relax.

    2. Focus on your "third eye" without blinking. This is the area between the eyebrows above your nose. Then close your eyes and relax. It may feel uncomfortable or hard to do at first, but do not let yourself become frustrated. Keep your focus on that area and with time, you will find this posture easier to do.

    3. Without turning your head, focus both eyes on your left shoulder. Remain like this for as long as you can. Then close your eyes and relax. Repeat this sequence with the right shoulder.

    After you are finished, place the palms of your hands on your closed eyes and rest for as long as you would like.

    Imagination to Balance Visual Concentration
    Lie on your back facing up. Your palms should face the ceiling and your legs should be about shoulder-width apart. If you are doing this exercise in your office then sit comfortably in your chair.

    Close your eyes. Breathe into your belly. Feel it expand as it fills with air. Continue for a few minutes and then open your eyes. Look at some object. Close your eyes again and continue "seeing" that object. This exercise helps to relax your eyes. It also balances mental focus with imagination.

    Meditation to Balance Visual Concentration
    Lie on your back facing up. Your palms should face the ceiling and your legs should be about shoulder-width apart. If you are doing this exercise in your office then sit comfortably in your chair.

    Close your eyes and place your palms over your closed eyes. Breathe into your belly. Feel it expand as it fills with air. Continue for a few minutes and then open your eyes. Look at some object. Look but keep your mind empty. Don't let yourself attach to it or stare at it. This exercise teaches you how to focus without straining or depleting your eyes.
  • In addition to all of these, there are glasses that help reduce eye strain called "computer glasses."
    Gunnar Optiks is a company that provides such glasses, and got famous for providing eyewear to gamers. It seems that a lot - if not all - glasses and optics companies have computer/gaming eyewear. Good glasses start running at about $40. [Recommend mostly to the players who are playing at tournaments nearly every weekend]​
Posture
Generally, what's most comfortable for you when playing is best, but in order to prevent back problems in the future here's how to sit properly.


  • Sit as far back in the chair as possible, with your back straight and shoulders back and relaxed.
  • Distribute your weight on your hips evenly.
  • Keep your knees at a 90 degree angle; your knees should be even with or slightly higher than your hips (try not to cross your legs).
  • Try not to sit in the same position for more than 30 minutes.
  • When getting out of the chair, don't use your waist or back to get up, use your legs. It helps to slide forward in the chair first.
With all that said, most people don't sit with correct posture (I'm working on my posture) so implementing this for the first time at a tournament may not be a good idea.
Practice good sitting posture when on the computer, practicing Melee, or whenever you're sitting. Doing so will get the correct muscles strong enough so it becomes comfortable.

Whenever you're uncomfortable with your sitting position, change it. If your legs, back, neck, or shoulders are bothering you after a tournament, you should fix your posture.


Mental Health
Keeping your mind at the top of its game is pertinent to playing at your best.

  • Mental Exercise
    • Make and keep your mind quick and buff - by using it! Puzzles, thought-provoking movies, reading, board games, practicing remembering/visualizing things, and other video games are good ways to exercise the brain. Plus, there are tons of 'brain power' games and sites these days (Luminosity is a popular site)
    • A daily meditation habit has been shown to improve attention and focus, both very important for competitive play [Here are some guided meditations to help you out]
  • Physical Exercise
    Having good cardiovascular fitness will help blood flow to the brain, thus more 'mind power' - helps improve memory and maybe even decision making abilities. You don't have to become a bodybuilder or tri-athlete, you just need to keep good cardiovascular and heart fitness. Aerobic exercises like running, biking, swimming, and even walking keep the heart happy. Anaerobic exercises are great too, as long as you keep your heart-rate up. Tip: If/when you're practicing techskill by yourself (vs a CPU or whatever), every stock you lose during your practice session is how many pushups/pullups/situps you do throughout the day (or right after practicing); or, for every stock that's how many minutes you're going to walk today or run/swim throughout the week. (Also, be sure to check out the SWF Gym thread to get in contact of other Smasher who want/like to exercise)​
  • Rest your mind
    Sometimes, you just need to stop thinking. On a day to day basis, and to rest from thought-heavy situatoins.
    A tournament can be hard on your mental capacities, so finding things to remove your thoughts from the stress, commotion, yomi, and whatever else your thoughts are on will be helpful in being able to focus throughout a tournament.​
    • Music in a pair of headphones helps 'remove' yourself from the environment and give yourself a break.
    • Meditation, though takes practice, can be invaluable to a competitor since it can help remove distractions at the tournament (or in your life), and help you focus.
    • Any activity that takes your mind off things and doesn't require much (new) thinking: Juggling, tetris, drawing, sleeping, taking a walk, etc. Whatever works for you.
    • If you're feeling tired, try to take a nap. Even naps that are around 10 minutes can improve your alertness and performance (at least for a little while) - but don't sleep for longer than 30 minutes.
    • When trying to learn new techniques (or characters), it's good to rest your mind after the practice and learning - it's makes the learning more effective
  • Fuel your brain
    Your brain LOVES glucose, and uses a bunch of it. So to make sure your mind has enough fuel, snack up on carbs during a tournament.​
    • Complex Carbs: These are the long-lasting, time-releasing carbs. Whole grains, fruits, and veggies provide these. Recommended for your 'bigger' meals when you have a good amount of down time.
    • Simple Carbs: The short-term, instant-boost type of carbs. Basically anything that is artificially sweetened with sugar and corn syrup: candy, soda, chocolate, jam; and even fruits and juices. Recommended for the mini-snack in between/before matches.
    • Hunger Affects Desicion-Making and Perception of Risk: Eat and think well.
Basic Tournament Attendee Tips
[A succinct version of my AiB blog post A Guide To Tournament Attendee Greatness]
  • Show up early!: By doing so you'll have more time to warm-up, get comfortable, and get the tournament running quicker.
  • Bring snacks and water: provide yourself with the necessary nutrients so you can stay playing your best - PBJs, energy bars, fruits, and juice are great snacks. And staying hydrated is of utmost importance.
  • Stay clean: shower, brush your teeth, put on deodorant (under-arm, not spray; not everyone likes to breathe in DO, plus under-arm helps prevent sweat and stench), and, for the love of all that is good, please wash your hands. And, if you do decide to go to a tournament sick, try to find a surgical-mask to help prevent spreading the sickness.
  • Use hand sanitizer: helps prevent the spread of pathogens, and keeps your hands drier in those intense matches
  • Dress comfortably: in slacks and a tie, or in your pjs, be comfortable so you can stay focused (HugS has more to say on this).
  • Keep your stuff together: try not to bring too much, otherwise you'll have more to look after. Bring a small bag or backpack to keep with you at all time - when you're playing, let one of your friends watching hold it, or put it between your legs or at your feet (I also like to put the loop of my backpack around my foot just in case).
  • Help the TOs: Bring set-ups, exact change, play your matches, get other people to play their matches, and, most of all, listen and respect your TOs and the rules of the venue. The more you do these things the more time you'll have for friendlies, and the better chances the TOs will host again.
  • The Pro Tip: from HugS
  • Preparing for a National: from Melee It On Me
__________________________________________________________________

I'm not a health professional, or recognized as one, so don't take what I've posted on here as 100% proven to work or the only things that do work - I'm just trying to help.
If you have any questions about if you should do some of these, consult a physician or doctor.


If anyone has anything to add (ie, articles, websites, ideas for what else to make/keep healthy, etc) post away. Otherwise, I hope this is helpful.
 
Last edited:

ShrieK1295

Smash Journeyman
Joined
Dec 26, 2009
Messages
371
#3
Next time I play, I'm gonna spend a long time trying to relearn to play in a more comfortable way.. not looking forward to the impending loss train
 

Shadic

Alakadoof?
Joined
Dec 18, 2003
Messages
5,698
Location
Olympia, WA
NNID
Shadoof
#4
Wrist Circles

Sit in neutral position with your arms resting on your armrests. Slide your forearms forward slightly and make loose fists with both hands. Inhale. Exhale and slowly rotate both wrists outwards, letting your forearms follow the movement. Rotate outwards ten times, continuing to breathe. Keeping your hands in loose fists, rotate inwards ten times, continuing to breathe. You should feel a slight stretch in your wrists during the rotations. Increase the range of the circles slightly if you don't feel a stretch.
This ergocise stretches the wrist muscles, increases circulation in wrists, and helps prevent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.
I'm guessing it's a bad thing if both of my wrists pop every single circle I make? :alakadoof:
 
Joined
May 23, 2006
Messages
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Location
Henderson, NV
#5
I'm guessing it's a bad thing if both of my wrists pop every single circle I make? :alakadoof:
It's not good, that's for sure.
My wrists pop, but I've had years of sports, weight-lifting, and some construction work for reason why. Plus, bad wrists run in my family.

If there is no pain from the popping, you should be fine.
 

JKJ

Smash Ace
Joined
Jul 23, 2012
Messages
544
Location
Long Island
#6
I do Crossfit.
I have no health problems except for the fact that I'm a little overweight, but I manage my health well and have no problems in my bloodwork or otherwise.
I play Melee fine, take regular breaks in long sessions; etc.
Being in good health, mentally and physically, does wonders for your play.
 

I.B

Smash Lord
Joined
Apr 14, 2007
Messages
1,704
Location
Torontario
#25
Love this thread. I've embarked on making these exercises and practices habitual. Seriously, EVERYONE should learn from the things listed and adopt them.

Practicing hardcore to improve is fulfilling and all... but take care of your self first.
 
Joined
May 23, 2006
Messages
829
Location
Henderson, NV
#27
Love this thread. I've embarked on making these exercises and practices habitual. Seriously, EVERYONE should learn from the things listed and adopt them.

Practicing hardcore to improve is fulfilling and all... but take care of your self first.
Good! Forming good habits is hard, but it's worth it.

posting in a legendary, awesome thread
Thanks. Spread it to other smashers.
People need to see this.
 

MookieRah

Kinda Sorta OK at Smash
Joined
Mar 7, 2004
Messages
5,381
Location
Umeå, Sweden
#29
I think this plus having the proper mentality going into a match really does a lot to enhance your play. A lot of people discount the effects of eating and sleeping right before a tournament.
 
Joined
May 23, 2006
Messages
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Location
Henderson, NV
#31
I think this plus having the proper mentality going into a match really does a lot to enhance your play. A lot of people discount the effects of eating and sleeping right before a tournament.
I'm glad you posted on here, and said what you said, because I totally linked to your Playing To Learn post! :)
 

etecoon

Smash Hero
Joined
May 31, 2009
Messages
5,731
#36
Epic topic. These are the kinds of things I found myself focused on toward the end of my Brawl career(particularly the mental and eye things, I always felt like mediocre reaction time/processing speed and focus were the main things holding me back), wish I had started with it earlier. Melee topic I know but this is all advice that is applicable to any form of competitive gaming

Some of this may not work for everyone however. In my own experience for instance meditating or zoning out listening to music at tournaments never worked out for me, I just got too mellow and didn't play well-my best performances were when I was more amped up by adrenaline and caffeine. Meditating does do great things for your brain and I'll probably make an effort to do it more frequently if I ever get back into competitive gaming, but not mid tournament.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Henderson, NV
#37
Epic topic. These are the kinds of things I found myself focused on toward the end of my Brawl career(particularly the mental and eye things, I always felt like mediocre reaction time/processing speed and focus were the main things holding me back), wish I had started with it earlier. Melee topic I know but this is all advice that is applicable to any form of competitive gaming

Some of this may not work for everyone however. In my own experience for instance meditating or zoning out listening to music at tournaments never worked out for me, I just got too mellow and didn't play well-my best performances were when I was more amped up by adrenaline and caffeine. Meditating does do great things for your brain and I'll probably make an effort to do it more frequently if I ever get back into competitive gaming, but not mid tournament.

I think the best thing to do is find something that gives your mind a rest without completely mellowing you out. Take an 'escapist' approach - find something that totally disconnects you from the tournament, without wasting the mental/physical energy to continue.
 

Divinokage

Smash Legend
Joined
Aug 6, 2006
Messages
16,250
Location
Montreal, Quebec
#40
Most of it is great advice but I wonder how much actually applies to simple video game play. I mean if you want to get better at a video game, you train that game a lot, no other way. If you want to perform the best, ya sleep, eat good, don't feel like crap is also good but at the same time from experience I haven't observed a correlation of my performance if I eat bad or smoke. So i'd say that type of subject is pretty ambiguous and only applies per individual basis. You know.. what if Im super motivated but still feel horrible.. Ive performed better at times just cuz I had to drive to eliminate the player completely regardless of how I felt.

Id like some thoughts on that.
 
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