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Make Your Move 18 - Top Fifty Is Posted!

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Smash Daddy, Mar 24, 2016.

  1. Smash Daddy

    Smash Daddy
    Expand Collapse
    Smash Master

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,131
    [​IMG]

    The Fantasy Moveset Design Contest



    This is a moveset making contest, where you can make a moveset for any character you want and pit it against other creations to see what comes out on top! This is open to anyone and you can do any kind of characters, your imagination is the only limit. All you need is a picture and the moves, and to state if the set is for Smash 4, Brawl or PM, there's no set of rules or guidelines besides that to how you want to craft your moveset. MYM has been around now for over 7 years and we've grown into a close-knit community who studies all the submitted sets and tries to give as much possible constructive criticism (when we can), and it's all about improving your skills. There's no better time or place to post sets for Smash Bros, so what are you waiting for? Lets see what you can do.​


    Moveset Creation
    Movesets are made up of a 23 mandatory inputs: 4 specials, jab, dash attack, 3 tilts, 3 smashes, 5 aerials and the grab/pummel plus 4 throws. You will need these and a picture of your character at the very least, or else we totally unfortunately won't be able to count your set (and we like to have lots of movesets on our list!). We also urge you to provide a brief summary of your character, their stats and -possibly- a Final Smash, but these aren't absolutely necessary to making the list. Note that Custom Specials are entirely optional, as are situtional attacks such as ledge attacks or get-up attacks, though most people won't care whether you include them or not. If you're having trouble with your moves for whatever reason, be sure to send us leaders a Private Message.

    Below are our funkiest, lengthiest movesets to date. Most of them are really long and complex.
    Oh, and for those having trouble figuring out the right numbers or feel for their character's stats (size and weight and what have you), KuroganeHammer has collected data in Smash 4 [LINK]. For Brawl, there exists a [LIST] that compares Brawl characters' stats with numerical values between 1-10 which are generally used to portray a character's stats in movesets. Or you could just compare a character's stats to those of an existing Smash character.

    Comments
    While not obligatory, it is generally polite to give your critique on a moveset you've read. This not only helps others to improve, it's also a helpful exercise that provides stimulation for one's self. A great man once said: "Famous writers got to where they are due to reading a large amount of literature, and it’s the same with movesets. Commenting forces you to articulate that knowledge and put it to word; the helpfulness of this exercise cannot be overstated.". If you're not sure what to say, just try your best!

    If you liked a moveset, be sure to click the Like button. That tells people you read their moveset and liked it, even without a comment. But do try to comment, because no one likes being neglected.

    Rankings
    Some movesetters take commenting a step further (or outright skip it) and actually rank the movesets they've read, usually posting these lists on the opening page. These rankings can give you a good idea of what's hot and usually come with funny pictures, but don't be offended if your set is ranked low - that just means there's room for improvement. Can you win the Warlord Challenge and top his rankings list? (because that's really tough, man)

    Smash Daddy, MasterWarlord, FrozenRoy, ForwardArrow, Bionichute, Dr. Slavic, Reigaheres and ChaosKiwi all run their own rankings, but anyone can really if they're feeling like an entrepreneur. All rankings posted in this thread are advised to be put in collapse tags to not only prevent unnecessary page-stretching (we get enough of that with movesets), but also because the collapse tags will automatically reduce the size of images to make them look more consistent.

    Aside from your typical rankings, FrozenRoy also runs the User Rankings which tally the thread activity of all users in sort-of mini competition, a concept originally created by Smash Daddy. These come with sweet banners specialized for each user, and may provide you with incentive as either your first or highest-placing set is the character who represents you on the banner.

    Deadline
    After a bunch of months, we end the submission period and get to everyone's favorite part of the contest - the voting period! The end date is usually announced a week or month in advance, contesting normally ending with 100+ sets.

    Voting
    This the part where you vote for other people's sets and feel awesome when yours gets lots of votes. A vote is the best compliment you could give, but be sure to put some thought into it and take every set in the contest into account when doing so. Also, no voting for your own set, because otherwise everyone would do that.

    To actually vote, you have to show us an understanding of movesetting by advertising 3 movesets you liked in your own words, lest Fred and his friends all come in and vote thoughtlessly. This "advertising period" occurs right after the submission period ends and lasts for a week, after which you will be allowed to vote within the week that follows.

    When voting, you get 40 votes:

    8 Super Votes - 9 points
    16 Regular Votes - 5 points
    16 Weak Votes - 2 points

    Which are then distributed accordingly to the sets you thought were super-totally-fabulously-awesome, and those you thought were kinda cool. You don't have to use all your votes, but try to use at least half of them. Once you're done voting, send your list to BOTH FrozenRoy AND MasterWarlord, the Vote Gurus, through Private Message/Conversation.

    Top Fifty
    As the name implies, this is a list of the 50 most popular movesets in the contest, as chosen by collective votes. Getting into the Top 10 is fabulous, but actually winning is even better, of course. Leadership does make some changes to the list such as tiebreaking and shifting, but nothing too major. A raw Top 50, along with everyone's votelists, is posted on The Stadium as well, though you may request your votelist be kept private.

    Beyond the Thread
    There's more to Make Your Move than meets the eye: as a longstanding community, we've taken the liberty of establishing a few sites to meet our movesetting needs, so if you really wanna get in on the action you'll want to take a gander at these...

    [​IMG]
    Skype is where we chat; better than XAT. We talk about One Piece, JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, Nintendo-related stuff and even movesetting...maybe. We'll scout you if you show commitment to moveset making, but otherwise feel free to give us leaders a PM if you want to be added. Be sure to bring your Smashboards username (or something similar to identify yourself with) and a picture of a fictional character you want to be associated with.

    [​IMG]
    The Stadium is the home page of Make Your Move where you'll find the current contest's moveset list, raw Top 50 data and MasterWarlord's set rankings. Announcements may pop up from time to time, but these rarely show up nowadays.

    [​IMG]
    The Bunker is more or less the encylopedia of Make Your Move, filled to the brim with links to past movesets, contests and even useful articles to make you smarter. I hold administrative power over this site as of now, so just shoot me a message if you wanna become a member.

    [​IMG]
    The Whiteboard is where you go to preview movesets or look up sets that couldn't be finished. It also contains image sets that were unfortunately shrunk down by the advent of Xenforo.

    Leadership
    This is generally seen as the personified elite of the contest and those people who actually do have some limited responsibilities in running this business, as if they're Mr. Badd. If you ever want to talk to us, just give us a ring via Smashboard's Conversation system or through Skype!

    [​IMG]
    SMASH DADDY
    I'm the OP of this contest, I love JRPGs, mangas that focus on fighting and don't lean towards being a girl's show, characters that are irredeemably evil, poison used as an element, and my sets tend to be on the complex side. I've run my own ranking of sets since last contest and plan to keep it up, and have a few movements planned for this contest with various others.

    [​IMG]
    KATAPULTAR
    Kat is known as that guy who loves all the anime we're too afraid to delve into, he's a brave man who is not ashamed to say he loves Neptunia, Disgaea and a splattering of unlikely candidates for sets like Jason Voorhees or Funny Valentine. You're sure to get a lot of amusement out of his sets and he's always a reliable hand to have on deck in leadership, as the primary caretaker of the set list.

    [​IMG]
    MASTERWARLORD
    Warlord's is as notorious as he is fat, one of the founding members of the modern community back in Make Your Move 3, he survived the chaos through to the modern day, alongside me (Smady) one of the only people to get that far. His style has evolved as the contests have progressed, he loves HMAs (Heavyweight Male Antagonists) and has similar tastes to all the leaders bar Kat, who is almost his polar opposite in terms of taste, alongside regular long-time member Darth Meanie.

    [​IMG]
    FORWARDARROW
    FA is a later joiner than Warlord or Smady but became just as much a fixture in the community from early on, having a distinctly analytical, at times cynical personality and loving to let it seep into his movesets, that tend to be on the ridiculous side. He's made a set for a giant blob of Cookie Clicker grannies and dimension warping Yu-Gi-Oh villains, and he isn't going to stop that now.

    [​IMG]
    FROZENROY
    Roy is the neighborhood fan of more mainstream series than what typically is popular in MYM, such as Touhou, League of Legends, Warcraft and Star Wars, but is no less of a unique and eccentric personality. Of current leadership he's the one most outside the wheelhouse, generally having a pretty strict approach to how to do sets and judging sets harshly that don't adhere to this, and is always able to give deep analysis of what's right or wrong in sets he reads.

    Rules
    There are [RULES] out there set by the powers that be, and should be followed so you don't get sent to the naughty corner. Please remember to report before replying to posts that break the rules.



    And with that, have fun everybody! No seriously dude, Make Your Move is meant to be fun...and also educational if you read a set for a character you've never heard of. With that in mind, go on out and carve your own legacy!​
     
    #1 Smash Daddy, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2016
    crazya02, Nu~, ForwardArrow and 5 others like this.
  2. Reigaheres

    Reigaheres
    Expand Collapse
    Roses are Blue, Violets are Blue, I'm Blue too

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2014
    Messages:
    1,252
    Location:
    Behind your local Arby's
    3DS FC:
    1461-7646-7368
    RETURN OF THE REIGARANKINGS
    The secret ranking lair of that really cool dude Reigaheres

    TABLE OF RANKINGS
    10: Unlike some who may prefer to only give out ten out of tens to the ultimate set, I'm a bit more open towards what can receive a ten. As long as the set is very, very enjoyable and fun, with very minimal problems scattered through it. If you need an example of a set that can merit a 10 out of me, check out last contest's Top 50 silver place, Mr. Badd.
    9: In this rank are my personal favorite sets, if one of your sets has placed here, you've done a mighty good job. A set which places here will most likely be in my SV list, unless this contest Smady decides to take set steroids and makes 8 10/10 sets.
    8: A set in this tier is still mighty fun and is still a very well constructed set, and while still problem-scattered enough to not get a 9/10, a set which places here is a fun favorite of mine even if some things don't click as well as something above.
    7: At seven stars a set is pretty good yet still with its noticeable cons. Last contest I had a ton of sevens even from non-leader sets, so if your set places here it's sure to be a good set that can deserve you at least a pat on the back
    6: Six star sets are indeed good, but not as good as they -can- be, in other words, it still has a ton of room for improvement. Either way, sets in this tier still have a high chance of getting on my vote list, unless of course the Smady on steroids situation happens.
    5: Five points is of course the mid-way between these sets, in between good and bad, with many areas that are improvable and at the same time still pleasant enough for some fun moments with a non-garbage writing style or characterization. At this point I still like the set, but dang, fix the damage on that FAir already!
    4: At this point I start truly disliking a set, maybe because it's a bit clunky or maybe because its got some boring stuff, either way, with my reigahawk vision I can still see some promising bits, don't give up!
    3: Yeesh, alright, at this point, don't expect me to exactly like the set a lot.
    2: At this point, yeah, the set is indeed bad, but at least it isn't that broken or uncharacterized, right?
    1: At good old numero uno, any sets in this rank are incredibly unpleasant, be it an out of character nature, broken mechanics or moves or maybe a writing style comparable to Springtrap. But hey, at least most sets here are probably memes.
    0 - I do indeed give out zeros, and this rank is reserved for sets that can't even be classified as sets, ungodly abominations like Puggly and The Spanish Inquisition have had the -special- opportunity of entering the below one group. Yay

    THE RANKED SETS
    Enter the spoiler below for maybe good sets, maybe bad sets, but an around 100% chance of meme images.
    If I have commented on a set, -COMMENT- will appear below the set's ranking, linking you to the set's comment made by muah. This is of course way better than needing to go to page 20 something to see some comment on your precious set.
    Enjoy.

    Lickitung
    [​IMG]
    7/10

    Zyra
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    -COMMENT-

    Dunban
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    -COMMENT-

    Diancie
    [​IMG]
    7/10

    The Butcher
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    -COMMENT-

    Melia
    [​IMG]
    6/10
    -COMMENT-

    Link 2.0
    [​IMG]
    6/10

    Sproink
    [​IMG]
    6/10

    Piplup
    [​IMG]
    6/10
    -COMMENT-

    Electivire
    [​IMG]
    6/10
    -COMMENT-

    Paper Mario
    [​IMG]
    5/10
    -COMMENT-

    Roy
    [​IMG]
    5/10
    -COMMENT-

    TetraisHere
    [​IMG]
    4/10

    Excite Biker
    [​IMG]
    4/10

    Joe DiMaggio
    [​IMG]
    4/10
    -COMMENT-

    Sharla
    [​IMG]
    4/10
    -COMMENT-

    Run for your lives! It's The Appetizer!
    [​IMG]
    3/10

    C
    lassic Bowser

    [​IMG]
    3/10

    Captain Toad
    [​IMG]
    3/10
    -COMMENT-

    Toa Pohatu
    [​IMG]
    2/10

    Isabelle
    [​IMG]
    2/10

    sens
    [​IMG]
    2/10

    Ghost Gang
    [​IMG]
    1/10

    Crash
    [​IMG]
    1/10

    Geno
    [​IMG]
    0/10
     
    #2 Reigaheres, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2016
  3. Munomario777

    Munomario777
    Expand Collapse
    Smash Champion

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    2,832
    Location:
    Charleston, South Carolina
    3DS FC:
    0387-9596-4480
    NNID:
    Munomario777
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    GREATEST HITS

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    AMAZING!!
    OUTSTANDING!
    Awesome!

    Great!
    Good!

    OK
    Mediocre.
    Bad...


    A ranking and a comment?! That's two pieces of feedback for the price of one!


    [​IMG]

    THE BUTCHER
    By FrozenRoy

    OUTSTANDING!

    Kicking off the contest we've got a great showing from Froy. The set has a lot of cool, unique mechanics that play off of each other very nicely, and aesthetically it is fittingly gory for this character. I really like the risk-reward kinda stuff that the Fresh Meat brings, since your most powerful moves also come when you yourself are likely at a higher percent, and if you whiff a super-powerful attack, you're a goner. The set as a whole flows very nicely and feels like a complete whole, with nothing really out of place. This is a very strong start to the contest, let's keep it going!

    Date Ranked: 3-28-2016
    [​IMG]

    Mad Dummy. Mad Dummy! MAD DUMMY!
    By Reigaheres
    Awesome!


    I thoroughly enjoyed this set. Another great set to kick off the contest, Mad Dummy has quite a bit of fun with its main mechanic, what with spawning minions to make the stage a bullet hell with their projectiles. It's also neat how you can swap minion types to affect not only your actual minions, but also other moves. The down special seems like a generic counter at first, but it does actually have a unique purpose, since you can actually reflect the bullet hell you've created instead of being vulnerable to it. I like a lot of the animations here, particularly the aerials where the Mad Dummy flings its body parts all over the place, and the usage of the Mad Dummy's quotes is great. The writing in this set however is very clunky at times, with paragraph-long run-ons and confusing, hard-to-understand descriptions. However this is overall a pretty fun moveset, and while it may not do a whole lot that's revolutionary and has some problems in its presentation, it's still a really solid set.

    Date Ranked: 3-28-2016

    [​IMG]
    ZYRA
    By FrozenRoy

    Awesome!

    Zyra's a pretty fun set, with the neat gimmick of using attacks on the seed to make it turn into a completely different type of plant minion. There are a lot of different types too, from bullet-hell needle shooters to healing plants, giving some nice variety. Some moves felt a bit odd in which plant they brought about though, with a disconnect between the move and the minion and some feeling a bit tacked-on, and I also feel like this many minion types would be perhaps a bit too much to manage in-game. The attacks themselves are pretty nice, and do a good job at selling her keep-away-ish style, and you use the plant theme well in both flavor and function. Overall I enjoyed this set quite a bit, and while it's got its flaws it's still a pretty solid outing.

    Date Ranked: 4-3-2016


    [​IMG]

    ELECTIVIRE

    By FrozenRoy
    Great!


    Electivire has a solid base and plays off of it very well. The motor mechanic is nice, and I like the idea of catching your own projectiles to charge up; it's a nice extension of Tink's boomerang and Ness's PK Thunder. Electivire does a good job at keeping the motor stacks relevant, with different uses in each move to keep things fresh and interesting. While Electivire didn't quite blow me away, I did thoroughly enjoy the set.

    Date Ranked: 4-15-2016


    [​IMG]

    OUR BOY
    By FrozenRoy
    Great!

    Roy is, all things considered, a very fun moveset. There are a lot of really cool interactions here, such as launching Koopa shells all over the place, sticking time-bombs on them, using Bob-Ombs to propel yourself forward in shell form, and other stuff like that. That's really the highlight of the set for me, and these rather simple tools are expanded upon quite well. Some things I found odd with this one were how Roy doesn't really punch anything, instead swinging around his big, unwieldy cannon for every melee move, and also how his dsmash is just generic knockback and doesn't do any sort of stun (which I imagine could have had some fun implications given Roy's other tools). That said, I do still recommend this set, it's a really fun read.

    Date Ranked: 4-16-2016

    [​IMG]

    JOE DIMAGGIO
    By FrozenRoy
    Good!


    Geez Froy, five sets all on opening day? Nice play on Joe's "#5" thing. Anyway. Joe, as can be expected from the character choice, is not a particularly exciting set. But you do make good use of what there is to work with; the hitting streak is a decent interpretation of DiMaggio's claim to fame, and the crowd cheers are a nice touch. The play with the baseball is also fun, and you do a good job of using actual baseball techniques, e.g. dspec. Sspec feels somewhat bland for a special move, though. But for a moveset starring a baseball player, this one does a good job at keeping things interesting.

    Date Ranked: 5-29-2016

    [​IMG]

    SPROINK
    By Bionichute

    Good!

    Sproink has some pretty fun ideas – I like the water streams, how Sproink can manipulate them, and whatnot. The terraforming fits nicely too, making a pseudo-hot tub to boil your foes in. The soap seems to be forgotten for the most part though, and uspec seems like very odd input placement. The main issue I have with the set is the belly-exposure mechanic. While it is a neat concept, (a) it doesn't make much visual sense, as his belly seems to be as fat as any other part of his body, and (b) it's very inconsistent. You mention Sproink taking knockback from attacks when he's hit in his belly, but later on you say that in some moves he doesn't...? Sproink is still enjoyable as a read though.

    Date Ranked: 6-2-2016

    [​IMG]

    SHARLA
    By Dr. Slavic
    Good!


    Oooh neat, a team-based moveset. You do a pretty good job, Slavic, at making Sharla feel like a support-type fighter. A focus on ranged gameplay combined with healing / buffing moves do that pretty well. I think that perhaps Sharla does this a bit too much though, struggling in one-on-ones or free-for-alls. Her side special isn't useful at all without an ally to heal (barring dspec), and Drive Boost's inability to move – and thus get back onstage if you're so much as sent an inch to the side of it – is problematic when you've either got one opponent with the sole intent of sending you offstage, or chaos surrounding you and too many players to fend off due to cooldown. This is the biggest issue with the set – to fix it, I'd perhaps make the sspec bullets apply debuffs to foes, and give Drive Boost at least the ability to move sideways in midair and air-dodge. But Sharla is still a pretty solid set if you're playing in teams.

    Date Ranked: 6-5-2016

    [​IMG]

    DUNBAN

    By Dr. Slavic
    Great!


    Dunban is quite a fun set, with a unique twist on Lucario's aura. I'm a big fan of the depth of this mechanic, overall. Do you rush in at the start of your stock to take advantage of your stregth at the risk of taking damage, or play a bit more carefully to conserve it? The specials are pretty solid too, if not terribly complex. I like the idea of using momentum to affect the specials, and it helps giving Dunban an aggressive style – although I wonder if this would also make his uspec terrible at recovering from gimps. Dspec gives a cool way to manipulate the aura mechanic, which is nice. The set does however have its problems. Firstly, sspec's interactions with the tilts seem a bit tacked-on, and don't make a whole lotta sense – if you're encouraging follow-ups, there's surely a more elegant way of doing it, no? The moveset also loses some of its steam later on, not really playing off of the main mechanic beyond "here's an ether move that lets you ignore the main mechanic." But still, Dunban is quite a fun moveset, and one that I'd recommend reading.

    Date Ranked: 6-6-2016





    .....




    [​IMG]

    SANS
    By iamtrash
    OK

    Welcome to MYM, iamtrash! This is a pretty solid outing, all things considered. You do a good job at interpreting some of Sans' moves from Undertale, and the dspec in particular sounds like it'd be pretty fun to use. With that said, there are some noticeable flaws, and areas in which you could improve. The moveset has some odd uses of props at times, particularly the ketchup-based jab. Your numbers are also way off in places – a "strong push" sounds like more than 7%, and usmash deals twice the damage of Ike's, which seems quite odd. I'd recommend looking at moves in Smash and basing your damage off of that. Anyway, I can't wait to see what you make in the future iamtrash! :)

    Date Ranked: 6-5-2016
     
    #3 Munomario777, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2016
    IvanQuote, Reigaheres and FrozenRoy like this.
  4. FrozenRoy

    FrozenRoy
    Expand Collapse
    Smash Ace

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2007
    Messages:
    930
    Location:
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    "FRESH MEAT!"
    [​IMG]
    The Butcher


    Hailing from the Diablo universe and a hero in Heroes of the Storm, The Butcher is a frightening demon. Physically composed from the meat and bones of other demons and brought to life by vile magic, The Butcher sees all things, be they alive, undead or other demon as mere parts to be consumed, ruthlessly cutting any person it sees into fresh meat and terrorizing the town of Tristram. The Butcher appears as a boss in both Diablo I and Diablo III, but as with Heroes of the Storm we will be going with the Diablo III physical appearance. Amusingly, The Butcher began as a simple joke, as the game designers made a very bloody room during tiling and they joked about it being a butcher's shop, which then led to them joking that they should make a butcher a boss...and thus, we got The Butcher.

    In Heroes of the Storm, The Butcher is a brutal melee fighter who gains strength with time thanks to his passive, Fresh Meat. When enemies die, they will drop fresh meat: Minions drop 1, while heroes drop 3. Each stack of Fresh Meat increases The Butcher's attack damage near-permanantly, until The Butcher dies, at which point all stacks of Fresh Meat are lost. His Q ability, Hamstring, brings his mighty axe to the ground, dealing damage and slowing enemies to keep them from fleeing THe Butcher's horrific grip. His W ability, Butcher's Brand, slashes the opponent and brands them, dealing damage and causing all of The Butcher's basic attacks against that foe to heal The Butcher, which becomes doubled if it is a Hero. His E is Ruthless Onslaught, where The Butcher charges brutally at a target foe, becoming unstoppable until he slams his massive girth into them, damaging and stunning them.

    The Butcher's two Heroic options are Furnace Blast and Lamb to the Slaughter. When Furnace Blast is activated, the area nearby The Butcher will glow red hot with flames, exploding after 3 seconds as a devastating area of effect nuke. This ability can be used alongside Ruthless Onslaught for a brutal initiation. Lamb to the Slaughter, on the other hand, serves the purpose of utility and preventing escapes. Planting a pole down, after a short delay the nearest enemy in range is chained to it, unable to escape the area they are chained to and simply being pulled back if they do, making them short work for The Butcher's brutal close range game. As with all Heroes of the Storm champions, The Butcher has a wide variety of pickable Talents as well...but those are too numerous to all list here and some very irrelevant. You'll find out some throughout the set.


    Statistics

    The Butcher is a hideously large demon, with his size being 1.3x the width of Bowser and 1.25x the height of Ganondorf. Of course, such great girth does not bless one with great speed, although his powerful demonic legs at least afford him the speed of Link. His weight is appropriately massive, just a touch heavier than Bowser. The Butcher has decently high traction, but nothing super special.

    Aerially, The Butcher falls like the fat tub of lard that he is, comparable to King DeDeDe. His air speed is quite quick, while hs aerial control is quite poor, so in the air his fighting is rather...clumsy. The good thing is that The Butcher has high jumps for both 1st and 2nd jump, which allows him to at least get height easily and to recover decently well. The Butcher can wall cling using his sickle.


    Specials

    Side Special: Butcher's Brand

    The tip of The Butcher's sickle shines menacingly for a brief moment as he hoists it above his head before brutally crashing it down in front of him. This eviscerating ripping motion deals 15% damage to anyone it hits, sending them flying far enough to KO them at 170% as flesh is ripped from bone, opening a very visible, bleeding (if it's a robot, it bleeds oil or something etc) wound. The starting lag for this move is actually not that bad, pretty average, but the ending lag is very bad, as The Butcher must rip it out from the ground when used on the ground and has to rather drastically re-orient itself in the air from the power behind the swing. Both The Butcher and the foe take freeze frames like Wolf's Forward Tilt on hit, which really punctures (er, punctuates) the impact.

    Enemies whose flesh is ripped so badly take constant damage per second, albeit non-flinching, specifically 1% per second for 6 seconds, meaning this move technically does 21% damage total. More important than the damage, however, is the fact that as the opponent bleeds, they will drop Fresh Meat, which is here represented the same way it is in Heroes of the Storm: A somewhat small, floating droplet of blood. The Butcher may pick up Fresh Meat by walking over it, which gives him increased damage and KO power for the rest of the stock. Specifically, for each piece of Fresh Meat devoured, ALL of The Butcher's attacks gain 1% damage and KO 4% sooner...okay, not quite ALL: The Pummel gains no bonus, but aside from that. There is NO cap to the amount of Fresh Meat that may be obtained, so in theory The Butcher could have infinite damage and infinite KO power...

    In practice, though, this is a rather impossible dream, and something like 20 stacks is probably on the higher end. This is for a few reasons. First, Fresh Meat only stays out on the field for 6 seconds, and opponents can keep you away from it during this time, especially strong campers like Falco or those with strong disjointed power like Olimar. Second, Fresh Meat is not immune to the foe, and enemies can destroy Fresh Meat by standing on top of it for 1 second without leaving it. They are still free to attack, sidestep, shield and so on, but if their hurtbox at any point leaves contact with the Fresh Meat the timer will reset. Additionally, The Butcher cannot pick up any Fresh Meat that an enemy is in contact with: He has to get them to stop touching it first. This keeps The Butcher from just casually walking up while you're hitting him or stopping him and slurping it up anyway. Since bleeding is damage per second, this also means if no pressure is on the foe, they can just stand in place and destroy the last Fresh Meat as the next one spawns.

    When Fresh Meat is made in the air, it drips down to the ground like blood would, and comes to rest when it hits the ground. This means that if a foe gets near a ledge, they can make Fresh Meat drop off the stage and force The Butcher to go offstage if he wants to get it. Considering The Butcher's awful off stage game, this is pretty effective. As a note on Fresh Meat, multi-hit moves will not gain boosted damage on every hit, but only on the last hit.

    Thirdly, since this move naturally increases The Butcher's damage and KO power, while collecting Fresh Meat requires you to attack the foe and make them bleed, so you will simply naturally start doing too much to farm the foe effectively for Fresh Meat. Finally, and most important of all, The Butcher loses ALL stacks of Fresh Meat when he dies, and one can only stave off death for so long. When you die, you will need to re-acquire Fresh Meat in order to regain your strength.

    Some of The Butcher's moves also gain specific beneficial effects from the amount of Fresh Meat that The Butcher has. Butcher's Brand doesn't gain any special benefits, but I felt it should be said anyway. Oh, and bleeding isn't affected by Fresh Meat, since The Butcher isn't performing the "attack" causing the damage, so don't worry about The Butcher doing like 10% a second.


    Neutral Special: Lamb to the Slaughter

    Taking out a pole about the height of Mario, and a bit less wide, The Butcher throws it forward with immense strength, the sharp tipped end pointed forwards as a chain drags behind it. Enemies who get slammed by this pole take 12% damage and fixed knockback of one Battlefield Platform: Fixed enough that Fresh Meat won't add to the strength of the knockback. The starting lag on this, eh, slightly laggier than average as The Butcher hefts it up, but a good amount of the lag comes in the form of long ending lag. When used in the air, the pole is thrown at a downwardly diagonal angle. The pole itself does not travel far, about 3/4ths of a Battlefield Platform.

    The chain on the opponent will latch onto the opponent as the pole impacts the ground if they got hit by the pole (it won't chain them if it misses the ground), which will tether them to the pole. This tether is roughly 3/4ths of a Battlefield Platform to each side and 1.5 Ganondorfs tall, which is the only area within the enemy may move: Trying to move past this will simply cause the chain to keep the enemy in place. Unlike many tethers, it has no HP, and there is no way to break away aside from waiting out its 6.66 second timer. Of course, The Butcher basically doesn't have any projectiles, this is his best "projectile" and it hardly goes anywhere, so its not like it can be abused by just staying back and forcing them to dance the projectile dodge hokey-pokey. Only one foe can be tethered at a time: Throwing out another Neutral Special will cause the current pole to disappear as the starting lag of the Neutral Special ends, which keeps them from stacking.

    If opponents would take knockback that would send them flying past the tether's length, they will take 2%-6% (not affected by Fresh Meat, as The Butcher is not doing the damage) as the chain yanks at whatever it has wrapped around (by default the neck for most characters), dealing no additional hitstun or knockback, but giving The Butcher a nice little bonus for smacking the foe around within its personal murder zone. While opponents are tethered, the pole is in the background, so it won't obstruct things.

    Keeping the foes from running and just camping The Butcher's slow melee butt is an obvious usage of the move, however, it is also rather important for another reason: As I mentioned in the downside of Fresh Meat, it will become more and more impossible to follow-up on the moves of The Butcher, even the weaker ones, because his knockback continually grows, which can lead to him potentially losing out on damage. By chaining the foe to one spot, The Butcher can knock the foe around within this zone, enabling him to potentially follow-up on attacks that normally would knock the foe far away, and even getting bonus damage from the fact they would have sent them so far! This makes it rather important if one has acquired a good amount of Fresh Meat.

    Once The Butcher obtains at least 5 stacks of Fresh Meat, he may charge this move, increasing the distance it is thrown by 1/4th of a Battlefield Platform per second of charge (max 2 seconds) for every 5 Fresh Meat he has, with no cap. This can turn the pole into a more legitimate projectile and pretty much his only true long range tool, but unless one acquires much Fresh Meat it is very telegraphed by the charge time and doesn't go THAT much further. Still, it is something to remember for the situations it IS useful in.


    Down Special: Furnace Blast

    The Butcher lets out a guttural roar to the skies, his entire body beginning to burn a deep crimson hue. This does not take especially long to start up, and the ending lag is merely average, but it does not seem to have any immediate effect. It takes 3 seconds for the first effect to appear, as the area within 3/4ths of a Battlefield Platform and 1 Ganondorf above The Butcher will begin to visibly glow red hot, the ground seemingly scorching slightly as he passes over it. Enemies who pass within this personal furnace take 3% per second (not affected by Fresh Meat), which is of course non-flinching, making nearly standing near The Butcher a daunting concept.

    After 3 more seconds of this, a blast of fire and brimstone bursts from The Butcher, filling that entire area with a searing strike! Enemies who happen to be hit by this attack take 31% damage and are KO'd at 95%: Already high numbers, but when combined with Fresh Meat, this attack can be simply absurd. Of course, it's also hilariously telegraphed, as it takes a total of 6 seconds for you to actually get to the big blast. This is especially bad because The Butcher is bad at using weak attacks to keep opponents close to him: He's much better at crunching the foe up and eating whats left. The furnace explosion does also have a slight "delay" before it explodes out, with the fire and such coalescing into The Butcher briefly before exploding out, so it's not like it comes out instantly and with no real ability to dodge or anything.

    Oh, right, by the way, you can't use Down Special during the Down Special heat/explosion time, so you can't just have everything exploding forever. In fact, after the explosion of this move, it goes on a sort of internal cooldown, being unable to utilize this move after the explosion for 10 seconds. Now, this might sound like a rather large detriment, but this gets two bonuses. First off, the base cooldown is reduced by half a second for each stack of Fresh Meat that The Butcher already has, which means that if you collect 20 Fresh Meat beforehand, you don't even have to worry about this cooldown, 'cause there is none! Secondly, if you haven't hit that high meat threshold, collecting Fresh Meat while this move is on cooldown will reduce its cooldown by one when it is picked up, which can manage to make this move a lot more spammable, and also means it is generally more rewarding to have foes bleeding out when starting this move.

    One of the best ways to use this ability is with Lamb to the Slaughter, as the heat and explosion radius of this move is pretty much the same as the amount of space that the foe has to move within the tether, however the tether barely lasts longer than Furnace Blast, meaning you essentially must start this move knowing you will have them tethered and very quickly after. A far more reliable method to try and do this is to try and tether the foe after starting Furnace Blast, but this is a really obvious thing to try and do, so opponents will be very on guard for it. Furthermore, it's not enough to simply stand inside your tether range, as there IS a bit of vertical space to dodge you, and you can be hit out of the tether range: The Butcher needs to aggressively hold his ground until his Furnace Blast goes off or else he will get pushed off of his own murder grounds and end up blowing up approximately nothing.

    For every 10 Fresh Meat that The Butcher has acquired, after the explosion, the process will start again, with 3 more seconds of passive heat damage and another furnace blast, which is a pretty devastating potential effect, though you need a fair amount of Fresh Meat for this to happen. If The Butcher has at least 20 stacks of Fresh Meat, then t he Furnace Blast will explode even further away, blowing up with 1.3x its normal size, which considering it will also happen three times from the first Meat stacking...well, lets say there's a reason that getting 20 Fresh Meat stacks isn't especially easy.


    Up Special: OG Hook

    Swinging its chained sickle in its hand, The Butcher then throws it forward with great force, looking to sink into the flesh of the first foe it hits, though it will settle for hooking itself onto terrain as well. Travelling 1.5 Battlefield Platforms, the first enemy it hits taking 11% damage and no true knockback: Instead, the enemy is rapidly dragged to The Butcher's current location, encaptured by hitstun throughout this, with the foe and The Butcher exiting hitstun/ending lag respectively at essentially the same time. The starting lag for this move is somewhat longer than your average tether recovery, with variable ending lag: It is rather long if the attack is whiffed against foes or terrain, as The Butcher drags his sickle back to him, but has only moderate ending lag if it hits. By moving the control stick during this move's starting lag, the hook may be aimed in any of the 8 primary directions.

    This move will, like your standard tether recovery, hook onto ledges and pull The Butcher to them, The Butcher being pulled at half the speed he pulls people in. Not only will he hook to ledges, but he will also hook to any terrain that he can reach in the same way, which makes edgehogging a less valid tactic against The Butcher, as he will just hook onto the terrain past the ledge and drag The Butcher there. The Butcher is a hitbox while being dragged this way, dealing 10% damage and medium knockback to anyone that is rammed by his mass of fat, which makes edgehogging The Butcher really tricky, as if you do it wrong...well, you're probably going to be stagespiked by pure lard. The Butcher can wall cling when he hooks onto terrain, which will cause his second jump to be refreshed once per air trip, which can allow him to potentially recover from situations it looks like he can.t. The Butcher also can only use Up special once per air trip, though he will not become helpless after using it.

    Foes who plan to gank The Butcher offstage must be wary of this move, not only due to it being his recovery, but because if it hits them, it is going to pull them to The Butcher, who is likely quite far off stage, potentially ending in a double KO: In fact, if The Butcher and the foe die within quick intervals of each other after The Butcher lands a hook, he will be visibly laughing as he appears on the respawn platform, amused by the foe's misery. Foes may wish to instead attempt to hit The Butcher after he hooks onto terrain, as his direction will be linear and thus set up him to be spiked.

    if The Butcher hooks a foe who is chained to his tether, or otherwise unable to move, then this is a natural contradiction. The Butcher will solve this by trying to pull the hook harder, the foe starting to break apart from the pulling of both sickle and chain, before the sickle comes flying off and out of the foe with a gruesome cracking of bone and flesh, foes crying out in pain and the audience letting out their disappointed "Oooooh" noise as blood splatters everywhere. This attack deals 26% damage (replacing the original damage, not added to it) and forces the foe into prone, while leaving them tethered or incapacitated, and the blood which is sent flying everywhere will drop three pieces of Fresh Meat: One directly on top of the foe and one 1/4th of a Battlefield Platform to their left and right. Getting the first piece of Fresh Meat is essentially impossible for The Butcher, but the other two are more attainable, and this is The Butcher's only method of obtaining Fresh Meat without forcing a foe to bleed.

    Foes who are bleeding take an additional 4% from this attack and the bleed is more brutal, with more blood splattering from the foe, which remains on the ground for 9 seconds. Blood on the ground reduces traction, but aside from that largely does nothing by itself. While Furnace Blast is on, blood it is passing over and any blood connected to it will boil and burn, dealing 5% damage to anyone it touches and knocking them upward slightly, though strong enough to keep them from just landing back into it, with extremely low hitstun as well. This not only offers a stronger damage option, but it can limit the places that foes can escape the oncoming blast.

    For every 5 pieces of Fresh Meat that The Butcher has, the range of this move is increased by 0.5 Battlefield Platforms, with the ending lag remaining the same due to The Butcher's strength allowing him to pull more of the chain in at a time. This caps at 20 pieces of Fresh Meat or 2 Battlefield Platforms, giving this move a maximum range of 3.5 Battlefield Platforms, extremely impressive for the attack and a very large boon for recovery...of course, even the lower amounts of Fresh Meat are useful too, letting them aid your recovery.


    Grab Game

    Grab: Packaged Meat

    The Butcher swings its sickle forward, going for a rather classic tether grab with it: It has very long range for the tether grab, and slightly below average starting lag for a tether grab, but the ending lag on it is simply horrendous, as The Butcher will drag the sickle back to him via two tugs on the chain, giving it the longest ending lag of any grab in the game. While The Butcher has powerful throws and great range for his starting lag, the extremly heavy punishability on this move is a large liability when The Butcher already has punishability and defensive issues.

    If the foe is tethered or is unable to reach The Butcher, or by pressing A when the hook is landed, The Butcher will instead drag himself to the foe ala his Up Special on terrain, though he will not be a hitbox like that move. This allows The Butcher to go to the foe for better positioning and still grab tethered foes outside their range, but The Butcher travels half of the speed of the foe, and the foe may attempt to escape the grab during this time, so doing this means that The Butcher will have less time to pummel and/or throw the foe.

    Foes will still drop Fresh Meat while being grabbed or pummeled, so landing a grab is a prime chance to gather safe meat, but they will NOT drop it while in the middle of a throw: Instead, they will drop it at the end of their knockback if they would during the throw. This adds an element of greed to The Butcher, as he may wish to risk letting the foe manage a grab escape to try and gobble up another piece of Fresh Meat.

    Similar to the Up Special, this move will gain range for every 5 stacks of Fresh Meat that The Butcher has obtained, specifically 0.33 Battlefield Platforms of range for each stack of Fresh Meat, which will stack up to 20 pieces of Fresh Meat (1.22 Battlefield Platforms). Ending lag remains unchanged, as The Butcher pulls harder but has longer to drag it back, but the threat range of his grab can go up rather dramatically with stacks of Fresh Meat.


    Pummel: Tenderizer

    The Butcher sinks its sickle into the foe, digging and grinding it back and forth for a torturous 3% damage. If the foe is bleeding, The Butcher will specifically stick the sickle into their wounds, causing the bleed to last an additional second, giving The Butcher a rather critical way to increase bleed timing...too bad this pummel is very slow, befitting a 3% damage pummel.

    The pummel does not gain benefits from Fresh Meat, including the base damage bonus.


    Down Throw: Grievous Wounds

    The Butcher cuts into the foe with his sickle, jamming the blade of his cleaver into the foe and trying to split them in two, though the end result is the foe just dropping pathetic to the ground in prone as the cleaver is ripped out of them for 10% damage. Obviously, with Fresh Meat this can do a lot of damage, and putting the foe into prone can be very punishing: A particularly fun thing to do can be to try and use your Up Special as a tech prediction option, dragging them right back to The Butcher when they think they've escaped...of course, this option is pretty laggy if you mess up, so you can prepare to get punished.

    If the opponent is bleeding, then this will rip open their wounds grievously, making them bleed much worse. This will cause the bleeding to deal 2% per second, however, the opponent's wounds will also bleed dry and heal faster, halving the duration. In other words, you don't actually get more damage from this, you get FASTER damage. The other key thing is that instead of normal Fresh Meat, a Large Fresh Meat is dropped.

    I'm sure you can expect what this Large Fresh Meat, which is twice the size of normal Fresh Meat and dripping, does. Yes, if you pick it up, it is worth twice as much Fresh Meat! Since the opponent bleeds for less time, however, you still get the "same" amount of Fresh Meat, but it makes each Fresh Meat mean a lot more, as the means to destroy, deny it and so on are the same. If The Butcher wishes to increase his reward with this move, as it can drastically cut the time needed to collect Fresh Meat (important, as you only have so long until your foes will finish you off), he must take substantially increased risk, as any Fresh Meat the foe denies is essentially as if they denied two stacks of Fresh Meat, starving The Butcher off the necessary Fresh Meat to keep his blubbery form going.

    Grievously bleeding foes, if impacted with a bleeding move, will have any new bleeding also applied as grievous and heavy bleeding, with the exact same duration, damage increase and so on. If The Butcher wants grievous bleeding to stop, he must wait for it to fall off and then re-apply bleeding. Note that because grievous bleeding reduces the time it lasts in half, it can be rather difficult to keep the bleeding going.


    Forward Throw: FAst Dinner

    The Butcher brings the foe close to his mouth and begins to rip and tear at them with its teeth and mouth-horns, dealing 3% twice to the foe, before sending the foe flying forward not that strongly. This will only KO at about 280%, so even with Fresh Meat, it is unlikely to be much of a KO option, though a little Fresh Meat can be used to make it give breathing room.

    If the opponent is bleeding, then The Butcher will specifically begin to rend the area around their wound with its teeth, dealing an additional 6% damage as The Butcher rips some flesh from their body with its horns and devours it whole, sending the foe more brutally flying forward far enough to KO at 220%, which can make it a somewhat reasonable KO move near ledges and with some Fresh Meat. More importantly than that is the fact that devouring the meat naturally will heal The Butcher, specifically, it will heal The Butcher for 12%, the amount of damage this move deals by default. In addition, The Butcher heals for half of the damage his Fresh Meat stacks deal on the final hit (IE 0.5% per stack of Fresh Meat).

    The Butcher is naturally quite fat, but his extreme fastfalling and exploitable recovery make it so he can die significantly easier than one might expect: By healing off damage, The Butcher can rely more on his naturally tough hide to help him survive longer, making this one of the higher rewards for landing a grab in the set. Of course, your grab is highly exploitable, so if you're trying to land it at a high damage % to heal off...well, the foe will probably be looking for it, and possibly just kill you right there if you miss. Consider instead trying to heal at more moderate percentages to lessen the risk of failure.

    If The Butcher heals off this move, blood will coat his mouth area and drip from it for 6 seconds. This provides absolutely no gameplay benefit, but it is a rather grizzly aesthetic.


    Up Throw: Gore

    The Butcher lifts the foe up with a wicked grin, thrusting its head-horns up while bringing the opponent down onto them harshly, breaking them upon his horns and sending them flying for 13% damage that KOs at 184% vertically: Numbers that might not sound too impressive, but turn deadly with some Fresh Meat, and this is your primary KO throw in the end.

    Opponents will get busted open when this move hits them briefly, causing them to splatter blood over where The Butcher stands in addition to half of a Battlefield Platform to each side, which functions as the blood when Up Specialling a foe who is tethered, serving as a less super specific way to bloody the battlefield, though by default this only lasts 6 seconds comparitively, with a bleeding foe making it so that it will last 9 seconds as per the Side Special. If this splatters on top of pre-existing blood, it will add its time to that blood's duration, so repeated grabs and throws can make it last a long time...though you may end up just murdering your opponent by that point anyway.

    Blood will trail behind the opponent as they are sent flying due to busting them open cutting a primary artery on their body, following them until the apex of their knockback, which normally is merely a visual effect. While Furnace Blast is active, however, this blood will boil and burn just like the grounded blood, slamming into foes who don't get out of the way for 8% damage and flinching knockback/hitstun. not affected by Fresh Meat, forcing enemies to act or take additional damage on top of an already damaging throw. The blood moves at 3/4ths the speed of the foe as they were flying (including enemies decelerating). The blood trailing stops once the foe reaches the apex of their knockback and disappears. In an FFA, this can also be used to smack people above you more directly.


    Back Throw: Rivers of Blood

    The Butcher takes the foe on his hook and rakes them against the ground once, spinning very slowly and sending the foe flying low to the ground, dealing a total of 9% damage with a set Battlefield Platform of knockback that has a fairly shallow angle. The damage and knockback scale off of Fresh Meat, but the knockback scales a bit differently, adding on 1/10th of a Battlefield Platform in set knockback per stack of Fresh Meat instead and capping at 10 Fresh Meat.

    If there is blood on the ground around The Butcher, it will be sent flying around him slightly, pushing away any foes nearby with no damage or hitstun. In addition, if there is blood in the direction the foe is released, they will "slide" across it for a Battlefoeld Platform before finally taking the knockback of the move, spreading the blood along the ground if it goes beyond the length of the blood, which will last for half of the time that blood had left on it. This allows The Butcher not only to spread blood that is out somewhat efficiently, but it can "extend" the knockback of this move, making it a surprisingly deadly move if The Butcher has amassed stacks of Fresh Meat.

    With Furnace Blast on, this changes rather significantly, as the blood will burn the foe for 7 hits of 1% (Like most moves outside The Butcher, not affected by Fresh Meat) and it will change to knockback that KOs at 190% with the usual Fresh Meat mechanics: Combined with the sliding, it is The Butcher's best KO throw by a good margin and offers the most damage as well. However, this requires both blood out AND to have an active Furnace Blast, which makes it rather difficult to occur.

    Foes which slide across blood normally deal 8% damage and trip anyone they hit, making this a rather solid FFA sweeping move, but if the foe is sliding across burning blood they will instead deal 14% damage and good upwards knockback that kOs at 170%, making them rather significantly dangerous.


    Smashes

    Forward Smash: Ruthless Onslaught

    Straight out of a nightmare, The Butcher lets out a bestial, inhuman roar and begins plowing forward, a move with shockingly fast start-up, though hardly instant, basically a moment of The Butcher arching his back and his chest glowing red hot. The Butcher will then charge 1.25-2.25 Battlefield Platforms depending on charge, sending anyone he hits flying with 24%-29% damage that KOs at 135%-110%, which is pretty good considering the impressive range and quick start-up. The ending lag on this move is rather variable: If The Butcher whiffs the attack, it has tremendous and easily punishable ending lag, however The Butcher will lightly bounce off of foes (though keep travelling), causing his ending lag to be cut in half if he actually hits any opponent! This reduces the ending lag to around average and, if the foe is low and The Butcher has little Fresh Meat, can potentially lead to follow-ups, especially with the Up Special. The Butcher moves at about 1.15x his dash speed, so not that much faster, making this rather slow, and the duration is long: When The Butcher uses this move, exploit its long duration and slow speed.

    If the enemy is shielding, they will take large shieldstun and half of the damage of the attack, in additiobn to large shieldpush: This will happen up to three times during a shielding as The Butcher plows forward and repeatedly slams into it, which can shove people around and deal massive shield damage. On blood, the lower traction will allow people to escape it more often and easily, but it will also send foes sliding across it much further, which can send them flying off the stage, while The Butcher will stop at the ledge. Hitting a shield counts for the lowered ending lag, though without blood it can lead to an easy shield grab unless it breaks it. If Furnace Blast is on, then it will also usually shieldpoke the foe if there is enough blood for them to be on it after being hit, which will then force them out of the shield and cause them to get bowled over by The Butcher's continued Forward Smash.

    Blood on the ground will not cause The Butcher to go further, but instead he will simply travel faster, moving up to 1.5x his normal Dash Speed. Every 3 stacks of Fresh Meat that The Butcher obtains will increase the speed he goes by 0.1x, up to a cap of 15 Fresh Meat (0.5x), giving him 1.65x his Dash speed as a base and 2x his Dash Speed on blood, which can truly be a nightmare to deal with! Not only that, but this move also gains a truly unstoppable component as The Butcher gathers Fresh Meat, as each stack of Fresh Meat that The Butcher acquires adds 1% super armor to the second half of the starting lag of this move, along with the charge itself.

    Because of the quick start-up of this move, sufficient Fresh Meat can make this move into a sort of psuedo-counter, as The Buthcer tanks the damage with super armor to just recklessly rush into the foe and smack them MUCh harder, and it can serve as a huge rush to throw at foes, though one should be careful about countering with this: The timing is rather strict, as the first half of the starting lag is perfectly vulnerable, and the end lag remains fully and extremely punishable.


    Down Smash: Guts, Glory

    Blood flows and drips out of The Butcher's stitches, meat seeming to ooze out of him, before a shower of blood and guts explodes out of The Butcher's fleshy seams with a howl of pain, dealing 20%-26% damage to foes that KOs at 160%-140%. The range is a solid amount around The Butcher, though hardly anything amazing, which makes it a good coverage move...but not only is the starting lag long, but the ending lag is among the worst in the game: If the attack whiffs, an opponent could get off a shorthopped reversed Warlock Punch on The Butcher, to give you an idea. Considering the attacks mediocre damage and knockback, this seems rather excessive...

    That is, for one that does not collect Fresh Meat. You see, the fact that The Butcher is shooting out his blood and guts allows the most direct use of Fresh Meat of all, as half of the collected Fresh Meat is used to shoot out a more potent, meatier explosion around The Butcher! This, specifically, means that The Butcher gains twice the benefits of Fresh Meat for the attack, or an extra 2% damage + 8% quicker KO power per Fresh Meat stack! This means the attack can become extremely devastating, adding much more significant power to it than other moves and having unparalleled damage and KO power!

    Of course, given how The Butcher uses Fresh Meat in this attack, there IS an additional downside: half of The Butcher's Fresh Meat is squeezed out in the explosion, dropping around The Butcher within 3/4ths of a Battlefield Platform in range. If The Butcher hits this attack, then he has plenty of time to pick up the lost Fresh Meat, but a whiff can send The Butcher's meat count spiralling down and out of control. It's an eat or be eaten move, really, with The Butcher's highest leverage use of it being when he is at high HPs, which will often mean it is a death or glory attack.

    The Butcher will create 6 seconds of his blood puddle in the 3/4ths Battlefield Platform of range, however given the extreme lag of this move it functions more as a nice bonus than a reason to actually utilize the move.


    Up Smash: Chain Gang

    The Butcher takes his chain-hook and begins swinging it above his head, making a total of three rotations, with each swing extending the chain more. The first swing just hits above The Butcher, the second expands out 3/4ths of a Battlefield Platform, and the last swing an additional 3/4ths of a Battlefield Platform, giving it very good coverage. While this is all well and good, the full thing is not the same hitbox: The hook at the end deals a good 24%-29% damage that KOs at 122%-104%, but the chain is a much weaker hitbox that deals 8% damage and pops foes up at moderate strength, and naturally the chain makes up significantly more of the hitbox, though even a weaker attack that covers so much space is pretty potent...and it does get powered by Fresh Meat, so hey!

    The Butcher's height means foes usually must be jumping or on platforms to be hit by this: The first hit provides excellent coverage above you, but the latter hits actually leave The Butcher vulnerable high directly above him, so he has a rather severe hole in his aerial defense, similarly the fact he needs to swing the chain around means the horizontal range is somewhat sluggish, so if you try to hit people from too far away, they can just jump the chain and smack you.

    This move's special Fresh Meat bonus helps with this, however, as The Butcher's increased strength allows him to swing the chain faster. For every 4 stacks of Fresh Meat that The Butcher has, he swings the chain faster, up to 12 stacks of Fresh Meat. At 4 stacks of Fresh Meat, the chain is swung 1.33x the normal speed, 1.66x at 8 stacks and a maximum of 2x at 12 stacks. This means that, once the attack comes out, it's a lot harder to just approach over it. Furthermore, The Butcher's increased strength allows him to begin to whip out the chain quicker, lowering the starting lag of this move. 3/4ths the normal starting lag at 6 Stacks, capping at halved at 12 stacks of Fresh Meat, which allows The Butcher to catch people with its long range more easily...do note it won't stop the bad ending lag of this move (the starting lag for this move is also somewhat sluggish by default) and it means that the hitbox will move above you faster and thus make you vulnerable directly above quicker as well, so it isn't all guns and roses.


    Standards

    Jab: Garnish

    The Butcher performs a lightning quick vertical swing with his sickle, dealing 3% damage and the most pathetic knockback you'll ever see, along with pretty crap range. utilizing the second hit of the jab will produce a beefier attack more befitting The Butcher, as he brings his cleaver back and then chops it forward for 11% damage that KOs at 189%: Pretty good for a jab and the first hit will combo into the 2nd decently well, though the second jab has pretty bad lag on both ends and thus is shockingly punishable. On the other hand, the first jab is very quick.

    You primarily want to use the first jab. A lot. Why? Because the knockback is SO dismal that obtaining Fresh Meat will hardly affect it...which means that, as you gather more Fresh Meat, this is one of your only ways to dare chain moves together or, say, keep the foe close while hitting them, making it vital for landing KOs or racking damage. Jab -> Jab Cancel -> Move is a staple for The Butcher. It is also one of The Butcher's rare quick moves, which is important...of course, the range is bad, so they have to actually get into The Butcher's threat range before you can really pull this off.


    Forward Tilt: Hamstring

    The Butcher pulls his cleaver back and slams it down in front of him with impressive speed, quite a quick starting tilt, and with decent damage to it, hitting for 10% damage, and KOing at 225%. Sadly, the ending lag for this is pretty poopy, as The Butcher's cleaver gets stuck in the ground and he has to wedge it out for ending lag. The cleaver's got good size, so this has good range, too, and is a solid melee tool for The Butcher at all stages of the game.

    If the cleaver lands in any blood splatters, then the blood will stream forward through the air lightly going about half of a Battlefield Platform as a constant stream. Enemies who touch this blood take constant hits of 1% damage (Maximum 5%, not affected by Fresh Meat), and are pushed to the edge of the blood's stream, although without hitstun, so they can jump out of it or whatnot: The pull/knockback is rather weak. If there is a Furnace roaring, then the blood will instead be boiling and become a single hit hitbox, dealing 12% damage (not affected by Fresh Meat) and moderate KO power, a bit stronger at it's base than the normal version, but it lacks Fresh Meat scaling. Early on, The Butcher may wish to try and hit with this more, but it will get better to hit with the cleaver more as the match goes on. this also is one of The Butcher's only "projectile" options, though it's more like an extended melee attack than a true projectile (but it CAN be reflected).

    For every stack of Fresh Meat that The Butcher has, the blood will travel further due to the stronger impact, gaining about half a Battlefield Platform of range for every 5 stacks of Fresh Meat. This will also increase the maximum damage the stream can do (5% per half a Battlefield Platform of distance) and will increase how far they get pushed along, making it more important to actually attempt and escape it, and making it The Butcher's primary long range option when a Furnace Blast is ticking. If boiling blood touches blood pools outside of the Furnace Blast from the blood projectile, that blood will boil for damage equal to the streaming blood, with the knockback being transferred to being purely vertical. Blood that goes off the stage will continue to fall in it's normal arc, but with no ground, will keep going down for the alloted duration/distance.


    Down Tilt: Grind Up

    The Butcher reaches his hook forward and quickly brings it down, grinding it back to him on the stage with a loud, metallic screech. This causes 4 hits of 3% to occur if hit from the start, with each hit bringing the foe closer and closer to The Butcher: As outlined in Fresh Meat's mechanics, only the last hit provides Fresh Meat benefits. By default, this has no knockback, and basically puts the foe right in front of The Butcher, but the last hit's application of Fresh Meat will basically put them on The Butcher...sadly, the Down Smash's starting lag means it'll never true combo into it, but you can still try and use your less laggy moves with this, as the ending lag is pretty low, though the starting lag is high for a Down Tilt. This, along with your Jab's first hit, form a strong bulk of your "keep 'em close" combat with high amounts of Fresh Meat, and this has fairly good range due to the hook's size and The Butcher reaching it's arm out.

    If the foe is being dragged across burning blood, then not only will they take the normal damage, but they'll bounce right up into the Down Tilt's hitbox, which actually will make them take damage twice: This is also one of your best tools for raking in foes right before your Furnace Blast explodes. So keep aware of this move if The Butcher is about to blow!


    Up Tilt: Sautee

    The Butcher brings his hook above him before smashing it down and forward with a vicious, demonic snarl. This malicious movement deals 12% damage to the foe and pretty strong downwards knockback, although it has no KO power on the stage, as it will instead prone foes...unless they tech, of course, which will also usually cut their hitstun short a good deal as well, and potentially punish this move, as it has somewhat bad ending lag, although the starting lag is roughly average for an up tilt. and the damage is obviously very good when conmbined with Fresh Meat for that. Off the edge, it will begin to KO at 170%, but will KO sooner against faster fallers and later against slow fallers.

    Acquiring additional Fresh Meat doesn't just make this move stronger, but also increases the speed in which they take their knockback, with each stack of Fresh Meat adding a bit more speed to it, 12 stacks being twice the speed with no cap. As mentioned, they won't go further, but it does mean they reach where they're gonna go faster, which can make teching the prone on this move VERY difficult, especially since the speed will be fluctuating based on Fresh Meat every time. The hitstun they have taken doesn't go faster either, so it doesn't make it harder to follow-up, and it can be beneficial as well for if the foe is knocked off the stage, since the hitstun will make recovering a bit more difficult, or in team battles. Do be aware, though, that this means that if the foe DOES tech, then The Butcher is more vulnerable to follow-ups.


    Dash Attack: Pooling Blood

    The Butcher brings his hook low to the ground as he charges forward, by default merely as far as King D3's Dash Attack but this may be held via holding down A for up to 3 Battlefield Platforms, before swinging his hook forwards for 14% damage that KOs at 180%: Not the strongest move ever, but it's still pretty dang strong, and only a little Fresh Meat makes it really good, although it has somewhat punishing ending lag and the starting lag is merely average. The Butcher does not gain any speed while charging, aside from a small burst which quickly goes away at the very start.

    If The Butcher goes over any blood while travelling, it will gather and pool up as he goes over it, which The Butcher will fling forward when he flings his hook forward, throwing a mostly round blood red projectile forward about a Battlefield Platform. This projectile ranges anywhere from half a Pokeball in size to the size of a half charged Charge Shot, depending on the amount of blood gathered (Maxing out at 3 BFP of course), which deals 4%-28% damage and KOs at 600%-100%, making it potentially an extremely strong projectile! Of course, it takes a long time to get to that point, so you'll usually end up with a more mediocre projectile...though this itself is still rather valuable to The Butcher, as it does scale with Fresh Meat.

    Fresh Meat here will also make The Butcher move faster during the attack, although it takes much Fresh Meat to make a difference, but his speed is roughly doubled at 15 stacks: Not only does this make the attack progressively quicker to land, move around and so on, but you'll gather more blood faster for it, and thus be able to make blood projectiles bigger faster. It's a pretty oslid boon all around.


    Aerials

    Neutral Aerial: Meat Kick

    The Butcher thrusts his leg out and kicks in a heaVyweight version of the traditional sex kick, the muscle (and fat) behind it giving it an impressive 14% damage that KOs at 140%, meaning it functions as a pretty solid KO move with a little Fresh Meat, but like most sex kicks it loses something with time, going down to 7% damage and absolutely pitiful knockback at the end. This, however, can be turned in The Butcher's favor, as the later part of this move functions as his primary aerial setup and, with Fresh Meat, as a shorthopped approach option, since the pathetic knockback can serve as The Butcher's aerial way of keeping a foe close to him to be punished by a stronger move, perhaps even the start of another Neutral Aerial.

    At the same time, this move has fairly low starting lag, and so with Fresh Meat it can become a rather sudden and killer knockout move, making this a move that just keeps getting better as you acquire Fresh Meat no matter how you look at it. Do be careful, though, as this move has the traditional long duration of a sex kick, and while it does have good body coverage, The Butcher's girth keeps it from being full body coverage, and it has really bad landing lag, although the ending lag by default is just a bit worse than an average sex kick.


    Forward Aerial: Butcher's Cut

    The Butcher heaves his hideous cleaver above his head before sending it crashing down in front of him, dealing a gore-y 16% damage with spiking knockback that is fairly strong, around R.O.B. DAir level. This is pretty strong but, naturally, pretty laggy, mostly on the start-up, although the ending lag is still above average in length. The range is quite good though, given the size of the cleaver, for an unconditional spike.

    If The Butcher's cleaver slams into the ground, then the part that slams into the ground will become a sweetspotting hitbox, almost invariably the tip of it due to the swing's motion (the tip hits the ground sooner than the rest). which still deals 16% damage as per normal, but the knockback is now quite vertical and KOs at 115%, making it a rather killer move, especially against slowfallers with some Fresh Meat on you, and it is a lot better to hit with on stage than the normal version.

    The jackpot here, though, is to hit with this move with some blood under you that can get burning, which'll cause it to add even more power to the attack as the foe is pushed and burned in it, turning into a massive 26% damaging hitbox that KOs vertically at 70%, which is rather absurd when this is BEFORE Fresh Meat. Of course, while this is The Butcher's best KO move and super strong, it also requires a ton of setup, needing the foe on the ground, to use the Forward Aerial on them AND hit with a small sweetspot, with the foe on blood, and a Furnace Blast up. This Forward Aerial also has significant landing lag, making it very punishable if you mess up or the foe dodges it. An extremely high risk yet high reward move.


    Down Aerial: Hook and Ladder

    The Butcher performs a half-circle swing of his hook under him, with different damage and knockback based on when the foe is hit. The start of the hitbox, with the hook swinging down, is a spiking hitbox that deals 12% damage and an...okay spike, think a bit more than a Mario Forward Aerial, it's a good deal weaker than the Forward Aerial, but this move also has decently fast starting lag, so it is easier to actually land. The rest of the hitbox instead will shunt the foe upwards, dealing 14% damage and vertical knockback that KOs at 160%, making it decently strong, especially when Fresh Meat gets involved, and it can actually be a pretty good KO move, since if the foe is higher in the air, it'll make it easier to KO off the top, and even just 5 Fresh Meat brings the KO power up to 140%. The ending lag of this attack is rather punishing, as The Butcher must right himself (or pick himself off the ground for punishable landing lag).

    If The Butcher scrapes up blood with this move, then it will be flung up almost like a geyser, which will cause it to deal repeating hits of 1% (Maximum 5%, like most moves of this type not affected by Fresh Meat) that will push the foe up about one jump height, or a bit more than the distance between the main platform of Battlefield and the first platforms, which is an aerial position that The Butcher can actually take advantage of due to his good reach and the fact that The Butcher has a good jump. If the blood is burning, then it'll deal a solid hit of 9%, while also popping the foe up in a manner not unlike a flipkick-esque move, which can also be a rare good combo move for The Butcher and deals more damage but is less precise than normal, and the scaling on it is a bit high (215% KO power due to base knockback), so later on it is more of a GTFO move to make your aerial landings better.


    Up Aerial: Chop, Chop!

    The Butcher reaches up with his cleaver and slashes it repeatedly above him, chopping the foe up like mincemeat. This is a multi-hit attack that deals 3 hits of 4% damage, with all of the hits having a rather strong suction effect, which allows The Butcher to "drag" foes along with him for quite a while, even as Fresh Meat accumulates, and is one of The Butcher's rare fast aerials, with low lag on both ends, giving him some much needed vertical defense. This also can allow The Butcher to drag foes to areas where he is strong or with a Furnace Blast: He should beware that foes may be close and quick enough to take advantage of this, however.

    Every stack of Fresh Meat makes The Butcher stronger and thus swing his cleaver faster, with every 4 stacks of Fresh Meat adding an additional hit of 4% (remember that only the last multi-hit attack deals Fresh Meat damage!), which doesn't really have much of a limit, although the suction effect only goes so far when you're swinging like 10 times with absurd amounts of Fresh Meat and what have you. It's still an extremely potent potential damage racker given it goes WITH the Fresh Meat bonus and makes it harder to avoid/escape from early, however.


    Back Aerial: String 'Em Up

    The Butcher takes his hook and hoists it behind him in a vicious swing, clearing out the area behind him. This deals 12% damage and solid knockback, 170% KO power, which is nice because the start-up on this attack is quite quick to come out, in addition to turning The Butcher around ala Marth, which is useful with The Butcher's crappy aerial control and ground speed. Note that, like many back aerials, this has pretty punishable ending lag, so The Butcher's gotta be careful to use it for utility purposes.

    Final Smash: Dinner Time!

    The Butcher bangs his hook and cleaver together in a patische of Kirby's Final Smash while a haunting chord plays and The Butcher slurps in eager anticipation. This functions much like Kirby's Cook final smash, with enemies on the stage being thrown into the not-so-proverbial melting pot, which causes them to take rapid hits of 1%, 2% and 3% that always totals 13%. Instead of being shot out, however, The Butcher is rather...impatient, grabbing the pot and bowling it to the side, dumping out the contents! This deals 30% to all foes and puts them into prone, along with putting a few items directly at The Butcher (and the foe's) feet, although this produces less items than Kirby's Cook.

    The pot remains on the field as an interactable, super heavy item, which deals 20% damage and KOs at 80%. Normal characters have to alter their walk to carry it ala Bonsly and move at a similar Bonsly-esque speed, while The Butcher suffers no penalty at all for dragging the pot around. Characters like Donkey Kong, who can normally carry heavy items, can carry the pot at a small speed penalty.

    The pot will hold The Butcher's blood and any other liquid, such as water, inside of it, which will boil and bubble, causing the inside to be a rapid, 1% damaging hitbox, with the outside of the pot dealing 8% and set knockback away from it. Bubbles will ocassionally rise just a touch above the pot, dealing 3% and hardly any vertical knockback to those it hits. The pot can be knocked around and, if so, will spill its contents out, and it will spin when thrown, doing the same. Liquids that are ejected from the pot this way deal 12% and knockback that KOs at 145% in the direction the liquid is travelling. The pot takes damage as if it is a lightly damaged Bowser, but damage sticks to it, so more hits = it'll eventually be sent flying around quite a lot. Of course, the Butcher can more easily sent it flying far by collecting Fresh Meat.

    Fresh Meat which drops into the pot will become Cooked Meat, which is the same as normal, except that it gives two stacks to The Butcher, and upon release from the pot it has a small, 4% damage hitbox with very small knockback for 1 second. If Cooked Meat remains in the pot for 5 seconds, it will become Rare Meat, which gives THREE Fresh Meat stacks to The Butcher and has a 7% damage hitbox with small knockback for 3 seconds after! Fresh Meat will not decay and go away while in the pot.

    The pot will remain on the field until it is manually thrown/hit/and so on off, and The Butcher may have as many pots as he is able to gain Final Smashes. If two or more liquids from pots rush into each other, they will crash gloriously into each other for a huge hitbox that deals 22% and KOs at 60%! Of course, this requires a specific interaction after getting TWO Final Smashes, so...
     
    #4 FrozenRoy, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2016
    Reigaheres, JOE!, Veggi and 7 others like this.
  5. Munomario777

    Munomario777
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    Smash Champion

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    2,832
    Location:
    Charleston, South Carolina
    3DS FC:
    0387-9596-4480
    NNID:
    Munomario777
    [​IMG]

    The Paper Mario series is one of the more prominent Mario spinoffs, and it's more than the Mario series in paper form -- it's got unique locales, characters, and plots unique to itself. (Well, that didn't quite "stick" in recent years.) And perhaps the best showcase of that is Paper Mario himself. You might think he'd be just a Mario clone, but you'd be wrong: he's got unique moves, abilities, and partners that set him apart in a Smash Bros. environment. Not to mention his unique paper appearance and the ways he can take advantage of it! So join me as we explore what Paper Mario brings to the table in Smash for Wii U!

    STATS

    Paper Mario's stats are actually quite different from those of his three-dimensional counterpart. He runs a bit more slowly, but is very fast and agile in the air, complete with good jump height. Being made of paper though, he has an extremely low weight stat, even lighter than Jigglypuff! Of course, he's also extremely floaty, which gives him a good recovery and ability to stay in the air, but he may have some trouble landing from up high. Paper Mario is a fighter that likes to keep away from his opponents, mostly because of his extremely low endurance despite a rather excellent recovery.

    [​IMG]

    Speaking of recovery, he has a glide in the form of a paper plane! Just hold the jump button, and you'll fold up and glide through the air. It functions just like gliding did in Brawl, and for the glide attack, he'll get a little boost forward in a straight line to attack foes for 12% of damage and moderate upward-forward knockback. This will end the glide, and while Paper Mario won't enter a helpless state, he won't be able to glide again until he lands or grabs a ledge (getting hit won't refresh it). Needless to say, this is great for recovery, and can also be used to extend combos in some situations since the glide attack has little endlag. Paper Mario can also wall jump, and even cling to walls like a sticker! That's about the extent of his Sticker Star inspiration though.

    FLAVOR

    Standing:

    Paper Mario just kinda stands there, his idle animation matching his games.

    Walking:

    Paper Mario's walking animation is also the same as in his games (see the link above), which in turn is pretty much the Super Mario World walking sprite.

    Dashing:
    [​IMG]
    Paper Mario's dashing animation is the same as his walking animation, but sped up -- just like in Super Paper Mario. Also like in the Wii game, Dashell (the Pixl partner that allowed him to dash; pictured above) appears briefly when he begins to dash.

    Crouching:
    When crouching, Paper Mario will just go flat onto the ground, taking advantage of his paper nature for the lowest crouch in the game.

    Crawling:

    Paper Mario can also crawl -- he'll curl up into a paper tube and roll around, dodging attacks with ease (although his hurtbox is obviously a bit taller compared to the crouch).

    Jump:
    [​IMG]
    Paper Mario's jump animation is pretty much the same as the normal Mario games. His midair jump has this same animation, but when jumping backwards in midair, he'll spin around, revealing his flat, paper-y nature. The jump's sound effect is of course from the Paper Mario games.

    Shielding:
    [​IMG]
    Paper Mario's shielding animation is the same as in the Paper Mario games -- he'll duck down and tug downward on his hat. When he lands a powershield (for which he has an increased window of time compared to other fighters), the shield bubble itself won't appear at all, leaving only Paper Mario in his blocking animation. Also, the "NICE" text in the above image will pop up, as well as a star popping out right as the attack hits (like when Kirby lands during an aerial attack), and the foe will take 1% of damage like in the Paper Mario games. They'll also undergo an animation where they fly back a bit in the air at a set, modest speed, giving Paper Mario an opportunity to counterattack! While you can act out of this instantly after blocking an attack, there are a lot of freeze frames to emphasize the parry. Powershielding a projectile works the same as ever, but if the foe is close enough then the special effect will occur.

    Spot Dodge / Air Dodge:
    Paper Mario turns sideways 90 degrees like he does in the Paper Mario games, so that he's practically invisible. Even if the camera is angled, he'll still appear flat somehow! How about that. (He'll turn relative to the camera.) This is used for both the spot dodge and the air dodge.

    Rolling Dodge:
    A little black "selection box" surrounds Paper Mario, and the screen area around him "flips" around to reveal its "backside," just like when he uses his Flip move in Super Paper Mario. (It's quite a bit faster than in the linked video.) The same happens with his destination, where Paper Mario is on the former "backside" of that area. This is quite effective when it comes to dodging attacks, since he's pretty much moving between dimensions! It travels a good distance too, and has a pretty good speed. Since it's effectively a teleport, it can be tricky to tell where he's going to appear! However, there is a bit of startup to the roll that, while Paper Mario can't get hit during this time, is a pretty clear sign that he's going somewhere.

    Swimming:

    [​IMG]
    Paper Mario can fold himself into a paper boat, which is fortunate since paper can't otherwise float very well. Gets all... soggy and stuff.

    Entrance Animation:
    A little bundle of paper appears on the stage, and it unfolds into Paper Mario! Because who else would it be really. He'll then strike his iconic thumbs-up pose.

    Up Taunt:
    [​IMG]
    "What's that over there?"

    Side Taunt:
    [​IMG]
    Paper Mario's ready to battle!

    Down Taunt:

    [​IMG]
    "Hm, what should I do?"

    Also, press the button repeatedly on Paper Mario's home stage, and Goombella from Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door will come out and use her "Tattle" ability on the foe, revealing their strengths, weaknesses, and some of Goombella's signature charm and personality. It's like Palutena's Guidance or a codec conversation, but only Goombella talks. But then again, do you really need anyone else?

    Boxing Ring Alias:

    "The Great Gonzales" - What else would it really be?

    Victory Pose:
    This.

    SPECIALS

    Neutral Special - Copy
    [​IMG]

    Paper Mario is made of paper, but don't think he'll always be paper-thin! Because with his neutral special move, he can enter a charging state similar to Cloud's Limit charge, in the "thinking" pose seen above (before he hits the block). You can cancel it into a defensive option, or into an idle state with another press of B -- it's very safe, just like Cloud's Limit. The charge itself though, acts rather differently. Every second of charge, Paper Mario will fold out like those paper dolls where they're all holding hands, revealing another Paper Mario! This new copy will then go behind Paper Mario (as in, into the background a bit, like a stack of paper; see above), moving in perfect unison with him. Then you'll keep charging, or you can cancel it -- you can have up to five copies at a time. Even though you can't make any more copies if you already have the full five, you can use this move for b-reversing, canceling a dash, or perhaps tricking your opponent.

    [​IMG]

    What do these copies do exactly? Firstly, they serve as some much-needed protection. Paper Mario is super-light normally, but with some copies on hand, he can tough it through nearly any attack! If you're hit with a copy on hand, the copy will be destroyed, but you'll only take half of the normal damage, and the knockback will be reduced along with the damage. (This is dependent on the knockback formula, and the results will vary quite a bit for each attack -- but it should reduce knockback quite a bit.) Multi-hit attacks only take away one copy, and it's on the finishing blow (this includes jab combos etc).

    Copies can also be used for offense -- here's where it gets interesting. If you use an attack that doesn't involve one of Paper Mario's partners, a copy will perform it instead, leaving you free to perform another attack! Or do anything else really, you have no lag whatsoever, or even an animation. You cannot, however, have a copy perform a move if you yourself wouldn't be able to perform it -- that is to say, you can't be in hitstun, dizzy, helpless, or whatever. This will use up a copy, though, and they deal only 3/4 of the normal damage (and thus less knockback), so this isn't great for KOing, but it works wonders for comboing. Copy attacks also won't suffer from stale-move negation, but you cannot perform attacks using copies rapid-fire; you have to wait about half a second or so.

    If you hold the button while performing a copy-compatible attack, you can perform a super-charged version of that attack! This uses up all your copies, but they're all very powerful moves to say the least -- depending on how many copies you have. They can prove very effective for finishing off a combo that you used a couple of your copies on (copy attack -> copy attack -> super attack). If you land one of these attacks, the same visual effects as the powershield will pop up, and they generally feel super-satisfying to pull off, with a lot of extra hitlag. They tend to have more startup lag than the normal version, though there is super armor during the startup, and foes within range will go into temporary slow-motion like Cloud's Finishing Touch or Mac's KO Punch.

    Side Special - Partners
    One of the more iconic parts of the Paper Mario series (or the first two / three games anyway) are the partners. He has three of them (for this special move anyway), and he can cycle through them by holding the button. It takes about half a second of holding the button to advance to the next partner, and then you release the button to confirm the change. There's also another half-second of lag after releasing the button. Then just tap Side Special to use the selected partner's attack! So tapping sspec uses your current partner, and holding the button allows you to instead cycle through them.

    As a little visual touch, after you switch partners, the one you selected will follow Paper Mario until they perform their attack (after the attack, they fold up and go into him like in the original game, or just disappear if they happen to go offscreen; there's a bit of a delay before you can use the partner again). A few more partners will pop up in other moves, but these are the three you can use and cycle through with Side Special:

    [​IMG]
    Goombario, the first partner in the entire Paper Mario series, is fittingly enough the first in the cycle. He's selected by default, and when you use Goombario by tapping the button, he'll fly through the air and use his Headbonk attack. He travels in an arc 4 SBB wide and 3 tall, and reaches his destination quickly enough. Upon hitting an opponent, he'll bounce upwards off of the foe, dealing 3% of damage and a bit of upwards-forwards knockback.

    If you input sspec again as he makes contact with an opponent, you'll activate his Action Command -- each of these three partners has one. In Goombario's case, it'll turn Headbonk into Multibonk -- he'll bonk the foe again for the same damage and knockback. You can press the button after he lands from the second one for the third and final Headbonk, and Goombario deals the same damage, but now knocks the foe upward and forward with a bit more force. If you land all three bonks (two Action Commands, plus the initial sspec input to have Goombario leap forward to begin with), he'll deal 9% total, but more importantly, he'll keep the foe in place for some time! The perfect opportunity to attack. But of course, this requires some considerable dexterity to get all the Action Commands in plus the attack you want to perform. (The Action Commands are treated like shooting DHD's can; that is, you can do it in the middle of other actions.) So yeah, trap your foes from a distance and then come in and attack.

    Also, one more thing: you can indeed swap partners while one is already in play! But the delay when you swap makes it not as effective at filling the screen with hitboxes as one might expect. Also, you can only perform the Action Commands for whichever partner you swapped to last. So if you use Goombario and then switch to and throw out another partner, you can't use Goombario's Action Command to perform Multibonk, since a Side Special tap now controls the second partner (the one you just switched too). But I'm sure there's still some cool combo potential here nonetheless.

    [​IMG]
    Kooper is the second partner in the lineup, and when you use him, he'll shoot forward in his shell for his Shell Toss attack. It's like the Green Shell item, really, complete with the same sound effect. He travels along the ground at Meta Knight's dash speed, bouncing off of walls (if he bounces twice, he'll have to fold up and come back to Paper Mario). He'll deal 7% of damage and knock the foe forward at a bit of an upward angle. As for the Action Command, if you input the move again, you can make him briefly halt his movement before going again (his direction after stalling depends on which direction you held on the control stick: right or left). This can potentially knock foes into you, prime for a follow-up attack of your choosing! If you want, you can even hop on top of Koops while he's stalling to ride the shell Super Mario 64-style! You can use attacks when riding on top of Kooper, but the copies aren't taken into account. That is, you can't hold the button for a "super" version of the attack, the copies won't take Paper Mario's place, and charged smashes don't make use of the copies. You can however create more copies with nspec while riding him, if you don't ride off the stage to your doom that is.

    [​IMG]
    Bombette, being a Bob-omb, is the most powerful of the three partners in terms of raw attack strength. She'll walk forward when you throw her out, at a pretty slow pace. Use sspec again, and she'll use her Action Command: the Bomb ability! After a second of flashing and standing in place (pose), she'll explode in a Bob-omb-sized explosion. It'll deal 16% of damage and upward knockback that KOs at about 90%. She's very powerful, but her attack is telegraphed. That doesn't stop you from comboing into it though! She also has stamina: if she takes 15% of damage, she'll fold up and return to Paper Mario. If you leave Bombette roaming around for three seconds (she'll turn around at ledges, by the by), she'll explode with half the delay, which is quite effective if you can time it right. Bombette can also be picked up and thrown, but she won't explode upon impact with something, instead just beginning to walk again. You can however use sspec even while you or an opponent are holding Bombette to make her explode, although it'll damage Paper Mario if he's holding her. An interesting kamikaze technique nonetheless -- perhaps use copies to protect yourself from the blast!.

    The partners are in general an excellent way to play keep-away, but they're not without their weaknesses. Skilled use of these partners allows Paper Mario to get as many copies as his paper heart desires! Even if you're not constantly playing keep-away however, there should be plenty of opportunities to get a copy or two added to your squad. For example, after you've knocked a foe away, you've got a second or so all to yourself! Especially since you can just charge and then instantly cancel to get a little bit in at a time.

    Up Special - Lakilester Lift
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    As for a recovery move, the final partner from the original Paper Mario, Lakilester the Lakitu, pops in to give Paper Mario a lift as he hops into the cloud! From here, you'll be able to fly around at Sonic's air speed in any direction -- up, down, sideways, diagonal, you name it. After two seconds, though, Lakilester will fold up again and disappear. Paper Mario won't be left in helpless, so you can use aerials, specials, etc after the move ends. It's even possible to cancel this into an aerial or a hop to end the move early. The hop is a short hop's height, and doesn't use your midair jump -- it's separate from that entirely.

    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Also, pressing the B button mid-flight activates Lakilester's attack, Spiny Flip. He'll toss a Spiny Egg straight downward, just like the Lakitus in the Super Mario titles, which will then uncurl into a Spiny. It wanders around on the ground at a slow pace, dealing 10% and a bit of upwards knockback to any foes who happen to stomp on it (for obvious reasons). Prime for a follow-up attack! This will also occur if a foe simply falls onto the Spiny, or is knocked downward into it -- Paper Mario himself is immune. Foes can run past it with no consequence, though, and Spinies will fold up and disappear after only three seconds. Also, there can only be one out at any given time, and they only have 10HP before being defeated. (Throw a Spiny Egg while one's already wandering around, and the new one simply won't turn into a Spiny.) The curled-up Spiny will deal the same damage and knockback, knocking the foe straight up into the air. This means that if you hit a foe with the egg, you can cancel the recovery into a jump or aerial attack and follow up on the vertical knockback! There's a bit of lag between each Spiny Flip, but you can still cancel into an aerial or jump during this lag.

    Down Special - Remote Copy
    Paper Mario crouches down for half a second and then performs a short forwards hop, dealing 5% with his fist -- this can be canceled into another move quickly if you hit a foe, but not a shield. This hop will leave one of his copies behind (the move will fail if you don't have any), acting as a minion of sorts with a darker coloration than Paper Mario himself to avoid confusion. The remote copy is quite frail, having only 10HP. You can have as many of your five copies as remote copies as you want, although you should always have a couple with you to protect from attacks. On that note, you can get them back by using nspec while you're overlapping a remote copy. By tapping special again during this move's crouching startup, you can cancel it and instead have your remote copy / copies enter a blocking pose, and if an attack hits them, they'll block attacks identically to Paper Mario's unique powershield. (You can also do this with a single press of dspec in the middle of an animation, like DHD's can shooting.)

    After their half-second-long block ends, the remote copies are ready for action! Inputting a move that a copy would normally perform, will instead have the remote copy / copies do it. They can only perform three attacks before disappearing, although you can refresh the limit by using nspec to get them back and then deploying them again (although this takes time ofc). End this "ready state" by inputting dspec again so that you yourself can attack again. Remote copies are obviously nice for extending combos. Since remote copies stick around when you're KO'd, you can also use this move to "store" copies for later use -- you can also save them for after a powered-up attack, making it less effective but giving you some copies after it.

    In midair, you'll still do the hop, but as the copy falls it'll deal 5% and bounce upward. When it lands, it acts like normal. This is a good mobility tool especially for combos, but uses up a copy. It can be useful in several different situations, though, and can even be used to land by dropping the copy onto your foe and making them deal with it when it lands.

    Remote copies are another way to invest your copies, with lots of potential for combos and setups as well as some decent protection against projectiles, but it also uses up a copy and takes up a little bit of time to set up. The jump, though, can be a good combo starter if you land it, but is somewhat punishable if it's blocked or dodged. The midair version is also a great mobility tool and can help extend combos that are otherwise out of reach, but again, it uses up a copy. Managing your resources is an important part of playing Paper Mario in general, as showcased by this move: do you make several remote copies for powerful stage control, or do you keep more of them behind Paper Mario for protection and attacking options?

    STANDARDS

    Jab - 3-Hole Punch
    Paper Mario jabs once with his front hand (as in, the hand on the front of his two-dimensional appearance), once with his back hand, and then delivers a bit of a heavier punch with his front fist again. 2%, 2%, and 3%, the last one having moderate upward-forward knockback. This jab is very quick, and good for getting out of a sticky situation. However, it isn't exceptional in terms of damage, and it sends the foe a bit too far away to get any sort of follow-up outside of a well-planned partner attack.

    If you use the jab with a copy or two behind you, you won't go into any animation, as described earlier. In the case of jab, a copy will perform all three hits. Then you'll be free to follow up on the attack, since you can move before the attack even begins! The copy's jab combo however deals just roughly 5% total when performed by a copy (normally, it's 7% -- copy attacks only deal 3/4 damage). But still, this is an excellent way to combo into other attacks. Jab especially so, since its three hits keep the foe in place for a bit of time.

    But wait, there's more! Hold the attack button, and you can use all your copies for a super-powered version of the move. In the case of jab, Paper Mario and his copies all punch the foe at once, powering up the attack greatly! Each copy will add 1% to each of the first two hits, and 2% to the third, final hit (4% total). So if you have all five copies and use the powered-up jab, it can deal a whopping total of 27%! The final hit will KO at 80% from center-stage, too! (With only one copy, it KOs at 170%.) However, it's not very often that you'll have five copies to spare.

    The jab is also more exaggerated in terms of animation with bigger wind-ups, which adds some start-up lag, although he does have some super armor and a slowdown effect on foes during this wind-up, like his other super versions of moves. If you whiff this attack, you'll lose all of your copies -- this applies to all his super attacks. So while these powered-up moves are very rewarding, they also have a lot of risk to them. After all, you'll be susceptible to a counter-attack if the foe dodges or blocks -- your light weight doesn't help matters much either. But one nice thing about these powered-up attacks is that they're unblockable outside of a perfect shield, or the first couple frames of a counter or a super-armored move (the same window as a perfect shield), so your opponent will have to either dodge or be really precise when they block it.

    Forward Tilt - Hammer Combo
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    Paper Mario's signature weapon, the hammer! He'll swing it at a diagonal angle similarly to the Ice Climbers' first jab hit, dealing 4% (3% if a copy does it). You can then follow up with another hit of your choosing, acting like a two-hit-jab-meets-Dancing-Blade sorta deal. Hold up for the second hit for a hammer uppercut that knocks the foe upward a fair amount and deals 8% (6% with a copy). This is effective for getting your foe into the air. Keep holding forward for a hammer thrust with the most range, similar to Dedede's ftilt if it wasn't multi-hit. It deals 7% and moderate forward knockback (5% with a copy). Finally, hold down for a more traditional Paper Mario hammer strike, specifically in the overworld segments -- you slam it down onto the ground in an overhead strike. This is a bit slower than the others, and deals 9% (7% with a copy). It deals moderate upward-forward knockback normally, but if the foe is on the ledge, it's a meteor smash! When performed by a copy, simply angle the move like a normal ftilt to get the different variations -- like the jab, it'll automatically perform both hits.

    The super version of this move is activated by holding the button all the way during the first hit -- so the first hit is unaffected. It's the second hit that's powered up! You'll charge up for a moment, slow-mo and all taking effect, before unleashing the attack of your choice. Each copy adds 2% to the second hit too -- with five copies, there's 10% added. The knockback is also affected: with five copies, up KOs at 70%, forward KOs at 80% from center-stage, and the down variation KOs at 100% from center-stage. (Foes on the ledge or in midair are dealt a proper spike though, a guaranteed KO most of the time!)

    This move has good reach and damage compared to jab, and it can leave your foes guessing as to what you'll do. However, it has more startup too, so choose wisely.

    Up Tilt - Jump-percut
    Paper Mario faces the screen and then performs a leaping uppercut, in a classic Mario pose. He'll leap up one Paper Mario height off of the ground, dealing 9% of damage to foes he hits in front, and 5% if they're hit behind Paper Mario. It'll knock the foe upward either way, with the front dealing a bit more knockback. The front can KO at about 150%, whereas the back is weaker, better for follow-ups. The only problem is, you can't act out of the move until you land, so it's not very easy to land follow-ups...

    ...unless you use a copy, of course! It leaps into the air, leaving you free to use another attack. A copy only deals roughly 4% or 7% (back or front respectively) and less knockback, but the follow-ups are the important part here. Jump up into the air and follow up with an attack! This is also an excellent, safe anti-air, since Paper Mario himself isn't at any real risk. Remote copies can make good use of this move by stuffing an opponent's jumping approach if you time it right and have good foresight.

    If you use the powered-up version of this attack, Paper Mario himself is the one that'll leap into the air (about double the normal height), and then right after that, his copies will perform their own uppercuts to launch opponents upward, spreading out horizontally to cover a wide area. The knockback on this part is very low, but depending on the amount of copies, they'll reach a great distance. More importantly, they'll knock the opponent right into Paper Mario himself, who will deal 9% of damage and upward knockback that KOs at around 85%! As for the initial hit, each clone will add 2% to the punch up from the ground, for a total of 2~10% plus the 9% from Paper Mario himself (19% total). The KO power is consistent no matter how many copies you have, but having them is still beneficial for two reasons. Firstly, more clones = more damage dealt before the KOing blow = more chance of KOing your opponent. But more prominently, they also give the move more reach; each copy adds about one Paper Mario width to the reach along the ground, as they line up next to each other to punch upward. So you can snatch foes from a distance away with this attack if you've got a lot of copies! They also act as transcendent hitboxes to boot, so no attack can beat it out or halt the attack -- they'll just plow straight through anything. The only problem is that if you miss, you're left stuck in a bit of endlag and without any copies to your name. But the startup is quick enough (it's quicker than one might think). In a free-for-all or team battle, the powered-up tilt (instantrimshot.com) is a great way to scoop up multiple opponents at once for the kill. Speaking of teams, the partners from sspec can also help ensure that you do land this attack.

    Down Tilt - Paper Slide
    Paper Mario goes flat onto the ground, just like his crouch. He'll then slide forward along the ground, almost like a piece of paper coming out of a printer or something. He'll go about as fast and far as Cloud's down tilt (just a tad farther; about a platform's worth), dealing 6% and a little bit of upwards knockback again like Cloud's down tilt. This is of course excellent for evading attacks and getting up close with one of your own -- you can dodge pretty much anything that isn't aimed right at the ground! It is, however, rather slow to end. So while it's great for dodging attacks, Paper Mario alone won't be able to get many follow-ups off of this move.

    But that's what copies are for, right? Copies deal 4.5% instead of the usual 6%, but they deal less knockback too -- prime for a follow-up from Paper Mario! The dodging-attacks bit matters for copies just as much as it does for Paper Mario, since copies are still subject to the normal laws of priority. So if they collide with an attack that isn't 9% weaker than theirs, copies' attacks will be halted -- and for copies, this means that they'll disappear on the spot. They can however send a foe into a clashing animation and cancel their attack, again adhering to priority. Long story short, being able to dodge attacks like this helps copies deliver their attacks without being interrupted. This attack also has some great range to it -- you can treat it like a short-ranged projectile, except it can't be reflected, and has no lag! But of course, it will use up a copy, so.

    Another use for this move is for repositioning remote copies -- something that I didn't mention earlier is that they'll turn to face the same direction as Paper Mario when he attacks. So if Paper Mario is facing right, the remote copy is facing left, and you dtilt, the remote copy will turn to the right and dtilt a lot like Luma. Knowing that, we can use dtilt to move the remote copy, which isn't easy otherwise (although this will use up one of the remote copy's three attacks that it can use before it disappears). You can also get this effect by performing dtilt right next to a remote copy, carrying it along as you slide forward -- both Paper Mario himself or another copy can do this.

    If you press and hold the button and use all your copies on this attack, they'll all go flat on the floor along with Paper Mario himself, and grab each other's feet to form a chain -- Paper Mario is at the front, with his copies behind him. Initially, they're all folded up together, forming a stack, and then they'll unfold in the blink of an eye! This sends all of 'em but the one on the bottom of the stack sliding forward across the ground, similarly to the regular version of the attack. The back one stays put, though, so the length is dependent on how many copies there are. Each one adds a SBB of length, and also, they'll pick up any remote copies along the way to boost the power and range. It can only hit grounded foes most of the time, but using this attack, you can dodge attacks with ease, and reaches a rather absurd distance with enough copies. As for damage, each clone adds 2.5% to the base 6% -- 8.5~18.5% -- and the knockback KOs vertically (slightly forward-angled) from 130~80%. Numbers aside, this is the ideal long-ranged punish tool if you've got a good amount of copies. It has some startup lag, but if a foe whiffs an attack, it's an easy KO. If it's shielded, though, it's punishable, since Paper Mario ends up at the end of the move's range (he's the one in front, after all). Anyway, this move can also be used to follow up on attacks that knock the foe out of reach, and it can even go over ledges to edgeguard! Just make sure the foe doesn't jump or anything -- Goombario's Multibonk can come in handy here.

    Dash Attack - Spin
    Paper Mario enters his jumping pose and begins to spin around on his tip-toes, this being the iconic spin maneuver from the original Paper Mario. During this, he'll move forward at a speed a bit faster than his normal dashing speed, traveling about 3 SBB. After the move ends, he'll come to a stop to suffer a bit of endlag. It'll knock opponents forward at a 45* upward angle, dealing 7%. If you successfully land the attack, it can be canceled into a jump to extend combos! However, it's fairly punishable if dodged or blocked. It can also go off of ledges, continuing for a brief moment before ending with reduced lag compared to the ground version.

    If you have at least one copy when performing this attack, your copies will trail behind Paper Mario, all of them spinning around. The copies are a weaker hit than Paper Mario himself, dealing only 5%, but this can be nice to cover some space -- or to catch rolls and spot dodges. This also will not use up your copies. Note that a remote copy is incapable of performing this attack, but will join in if you run into it while spinning.

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    If you hold the button during this attack, you'll execute a different type of spin attack! Rather than spinning around on the ground, Paper Mario will instead jump up into the air as his copies form a "wheel" below him, like the dtilt but curled up into a circle. Depending on your copy count, its height ranges from 1/3 to 1.5 Paper Mario heights, according to circle math regarding circumference and diameter. Paper Mario will begin to run backwards on top of the wheel of copies, at a speed a bit faster than the normal dash attack, still able to go off ledges. It'll deal 3% for each copy, up to 15%, and upward-forward knockback that KOs at 160~80%. You can at any point jump off with the height of a normal jump. After traveling 3 SBB without Paper Mario, the wheel will explode into copies dealing a good bit more knockback than normal, and the copies will then disappear. This also happens if you hit a wall, a powershield, or the first few frames of a counter/super armor -- the only things that can block a powered-up attack, remember?

    When you run into a remote copy during this version of the dash attack, it'll "stick" to the surface of the wheel. Rather than joining with the other copies to power up the attack, it'll turn with the wheel and make its way back to Paper Mario, ready to be used for an attack after the dash attack ends! So you can potentially set up some remote copies on the ground, and use them to combo the super-charged dash attack into another powered-up attack for the kill -- namely, jumping up off of the wheel with an aerial or something. Generally speaking, this powered-up dash attack is great for plowing through opponents, and either serving as or comboing into a KO move.

    SMASHES

    Forward Smash - Hammer
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    Paper Mario takes out his signature hammer and, during the charge, holds it behind and above him at a 45* upward angle. Release the charge, and he swings it in a downward arc, hitting the ground. The attack is rather quick to end for a smash (although it still has some wind-up), and it deals 15~21% along with upward-forward knockback at a 45* angle. (Foes hanging on a ledge are instead spiked, like in the downward version of ftilt.) The knockback can KO at 110~80%, depending on how much the attack is charged. Speaking of charge, the meter from Paper Mario will appear above his head, as a neat visual nod. This is very quick for a smash attack uncharged, although charging it adds a bit of lag on top of the charge time. It can be handy for a surprise KO when used uncharged.

    A copy can also use this smash attack, and the other two as well (up and down smash). While a simple flick of the c-stick will have a copy perform this attack, copies are incapable of charging them -- holding the input to charge the move has Paper Mario himself perform the attack instead. This can be useful for when you need to use Paper Mario's attack power to finish off a foe when a copy's weakened damage and knockback just won't cut it. As for the powered-up version that involves all the copies, that comes when you fully charge the smash attack. All this of course applies to all three of Paper Mario's smashes. Anyway, if a copy performs this attack, it deals 11%, and weaker knockback that starts to kill from 160%. It's not nearly as useful for KOing an opponent, but it can be useful as an attack to just throw out there, or perhaps to combo with due to the reduced knockback. It deals high damage compared to other attacks performed by copies, so it's a viable option to be sure. It's also useful for spiking foes on the ledge while still covering other options with other attacks.

    As aforementioned, you can have Paper Mario himself perform a smash attack even if you have some copies by simply charging it partway. This also has the effect of having the copies perform their version of the smash attack in tandem with Paper Mario himself, resulting in a flurry of hammer swings! This should be familiar to those who played Paper Jam. The more copies you have, the longer the attack's hitboxes last! Endlag is unaffected, and will depending on your copy count let you move before the copies are done attacking to cover the lag up and then some. Paper Mario himself will deal the same damage, dependent on charge, as if the copies weren't there at all. The copies though, will deal the same 11% as they normally do. So while hitting early in the attack is still something you'll want to do, copies can also provide a backup plan if you miss. Oh, and this won't use up your copies.


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    When you fully charge this attack and you've got at least one copy, they'll all form a giant hammer for Paper Mario to swing! While it's not quite as ridiculously big as in the gif (the head ranging from Paper Mario's size to two Bowsers big depending on the number of copies), it still packs a punch. It deals 25% as a base, with 3% being added per copy -- that ranges from an impressive 28% to a staggering 40% of damage! Of course its knockback is immense as well, KOing at 40~0% depending on the copy count -- it's a one-hit KO! The drawback is of course the fact that you'll have to actually charge the attack, plus there's considerable startup lag. There is however super armor and a time-slow effect, like other all-copy moves, during the starting lag of the super-charged version (after the smash attack's charge), and you won't lose your copies if you're attacked during the smash's charge. But an easy counter to this, in a one-on-one anyway, is a dash grab to bypass the super armor.

    If you hit a remote copy with the giant hammer, the copy will become all crumpled up, folding and crouching down (take a peek at the next move's gif). Depending on how many copies you had when performing the attack, the remote copy will stay like this for two to five seconds, each copy adding an additional second. You also cannot command the remote copy during this period of time. Anyway, after that time is up, the copy will unfold in the blink of an eye as if it was spring-loaded. This propels it 2~6 SBB up into the air at high speeds, and it enters the classic jumping-punching pose to deal 5~20% (each copy used in the hammer adding 5%) and upward knockback that KOs at 130~70%. This is a pretty powerful trap, and the copy also now takes only 1/3 damage thanks to the added density. A good strategy would be to set this trap, and then combo into it using copies! Depending on how many you used, though, this can be easier and harder in different ways. If you use the full four, you have more time, but you may need to spend time replenishing your copies. If you only use a couple of copies, you have less time before the remote copy springs up, but it's possible to station other remote copies on the battlefield before using the smash attack and then get them back into the ranks when you need to combo. Also, it should be noted that this doesn't count towards the remote copy's three-attack limit before it disappears.

    Up Smash - Spring Jump
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    Paper Mario begins to bend up, almost like a spring of sorts. When you release this charge, he'll jump up a variable distance of 1.4~6 SBB depending on how much the attack is charged. Unlike the up tilt, Paper Mario won't face the screen, and it only hits in front. It's fairly quick to start up, and it deals 13~18% and KOs vertically at around 110~80%. After traveling halfway through the jump's height, it deals only 9~12% and moderate upward knockback that won't really KO at reasonable percents. It's a decent KO move, but it does have a fair bit of ending lag. If a copy does it, it'll only deal 10% and KO at 160%, or 7% for the late hit. It's a good anti-air move, though, and can be a decent safe, late-stock KO move. It can even combo, which is unusual for a smash attack. But if you want to KO, it's best to charge it a bit to have Paper Mario himself use the attack in place of a copy. By the way, like the fsmash, doing this will have your copies perform the move too, in this case trailing behind you to cover more vertical space, good for creating a big vertical hitbox to catch foes even if you jump early. It's also good for covering dodges, so if a foe spot-dodges, your attack can outlast it! Granted, it won't KO until 160%, but hey, better than nothing I suppose. Platforms allow you to land early with the move for easier follow-ups, which also helps.

    If you use this next to a remote copy, it'll be launched into the air, dealing the same damage as the usmash that hit it before falling down, dealing damage like a midair dspec. The vertical distance achieved by the remote copy is about the same as the usmash itself, although the usmash user's height will be cut short upon hitting the copy -- essentially, the remote copy flies up in place of the usmash user whether it be another copy or Paper Mario himself. This can be good for getting a remote copy onto a high platform or out of harm's way, as well as attacking above you. This also won't count as one of the remote copy's three attacks it can use before it disappears, like the fsmash interaction and the like.


    If you fully charge this attack and you've got at least one copy, they'll all jump up together, forming a chain sort of like the down tilt. The extra force added by the copies jumping together will propel you up off the top of the screen! You'll deal consistent damage and knockback while rising too, so it won't get cut down halfway up -- it's the base 18% plus 2% per copy, so 20~28%. The knockback KOs a grounded opponent off the top of the screen around 80~50% on stages like FD. The real kicker, though, is the fact that Paper Mario will jump right up to the ceiling -- so if you use this to finish off someone at the top of the screen, it can KO ridiculously early! Probably best to do this in a team battle or free-for-all, though, since if it's a one-on-one, it's easily dodged and very telegraphed. I should probably point out, by the way, that any remote copies you encounter during this move will simply join the attack and amplify the power accordingly. Anyway, right after you go offscreen, a "thud" will be heard as the screen shakes, as if you hit the ceiling. Your copies will be gone, and Paper Mario himself will come floating down like a piece of paper! He barely falls at all, but you can hit jump to cancel it with a short hop-height jump, just like canceling out of Lakilester. It adds a fair bit of ending lag -- and some visual humor -- to the attack. So if you whiff this attack, you'll be put in a bad position, as you'll have endlag and be above your opponent, prone to juggles. So make sure you don't throw this around all willy-nilly, like any fully-charged smash attack -- but even moreso here.

    Down Smash - Hammer Spin
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    Paper Mario twists his papery self up into a spiral shape of sorts, charging up an attack as he holds out his hammer. When you release the charge, he'll let out all that tension from twisting up and spin around, smacking opponents with his hammer. This has pretty great range to it, dealing 14~20% and upward-outward knockback that KOs around 120~90%. It's a pretty decent KO option, but if you miss, the long-lasting attack combined with some endlag makes it quite punishable. It comes out quickly, though. At lower percents, this can be used as an effective get-off-me move, and is a good option to KO an opponent without much startup lag. Also, hitting a remote copy with your hammer will push it into the background or foreground, depending on when you hit it during the rotation. This will make it immune to attacks, dodging them by virtue of being on a different plane. It lasts 2~4 seconds depending on the charge. While you can't command it until it comes back into the fighting plane, you can use dspec to get it back -- this is a handy way to store copies for later use if, say, you want to use a super-powered attack but also have a copy or two to use afterward.

    If a copy performs this attack, it'll deal only 11% and significantly less knockback, which can be good for extending or finishing off a combo. Copies also spin around for about twice as long, which means that you can use this attack as a trap of sorts to wall the foe out or extend combos! However, the second half of the spinning deals only 8% of damage. (So essentially, it's the normal attack, plus another second of spinning with less damage.) Copies can of course push other remote copies into the foreground or background. Like the other two smashes, charging the move partway can have your copies perform this move in a flurry right after you do, so it can hit foes even after the move's animation ends for some nice setups and combos.

    Using this attack at full charge with copies, Paper Mario will grab onto them and essentially perform Mario's back throw on the copies, with similar lag. Instead of the hammer, he'll swing the copies around to attack! If there's more than one, they'll form a chain like in the super versions of dtilt and usmash. If there's a remote copy in the way, it'll join the chain automatically, extending the length and power of the move. The one at the end will hold out a hammer of its own, this acting as the sweetspot. The copies themselves will deal 2~10% (each copy used in the attack adds 2% to this hitbox) and upward knockback. The knockback ranges based on copy count from moderate, no-KO knockback, to being able to KO at around 90%, the same as the normal version of the attack. The sweetspot, the last copy's hammer, is where the real strength comes into play. Each copy will add 4% of damage to the hammer hitbox -- that's a whopping 40% at maximum! Not only that, but the diagonal knockback KOs from 60~0%! Yeah, it's a one-hit KO, and then some (the knockback is more than sufficient to KO instantly on normal stages). You have to hit with the sweetspot though, which is pretty rare in a one-on-one match at least. This attack also has considerably more endlag the more copies you use, as the weight of them throws Paper Mario off balance as he releases the copies. With only one or two, though, it's nothing to fret about. It's odd that something as light as paper throws him that off balance, but then again it's not like he has a lot of weight leverage either.


    AERIALS

    Neutral Aerial - Barry
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    For the nair, Barry from Super Paper Mario makes an appearance! He's one of the Pixls -- or partners -- from that game, and his eight spikes will surround Paper Mario, spinning around at high speeds. Paper Mario himself meanwhile will twirl around like in the dash attack. The move lasts as long as Kirby's nair, dealing 10~5% with sex kick properties and minimal landing lag. The knockback is to either side with an upward angle, again similar to Kirby's nair; a late hit is instead a semi-spike. It's a pretty standard aerial attack, with a nice disjoint and utility for both comboing and general spacing.

    Being a move that involves a partner, this attack cannot be performed by a copy in Paper Mario's place. This may seem detrimental at first, but it's actually quite beneficial -- this way, you have an aerial to space out opponents with or extend combos, without having to use up a copy. Then you can save them for more important things like combos, protection, or landing finishing blows. And hey, so what if the copies can't perform this aerial? We've still got four more to go -- and spoilers, all of them can be used by copies.

    Forward Aerial - Hammer Slam
    Paper Mario pulls out his hammer again and performs a similar motion to that of the fsmash: an overhead swing, similar to the Ice Climbers. It isn't too slow to start, but has a fair bit of endlag, and it deals 10% of damage and forward knockback angled 10* upward. The knockback can KO opponents beginning at about 150%, near the ledge. It's got some good reach to it, and can be a good edgeguard option thanks to its low knockback angle. It's not favorable to recover from, since the foe will often be sent towards the bottom corner of the screen. It's also not a terrible idea to throw this around a little bit in neutral, thanks to its speed and rather low landing lag. If a copy performs this attack, it works wonders for chaining together multiple attacks and carrying a foe across the stage, thanks to reduced knockback and the ability to act immediately. It's also an effective wall of pain technique, with some help from midair dspecs and Lakilester. It'll only deal 8%, but this adds up very quickly! You can combo into smashes, other aerials, or even super-charged versions of attacks with some skill!

    Speaking of super-charged attacks, the powered-up version of fair is about what you may expect. Essentially, it's the normal fair but with more wind-up before the slam downward where you hold your hammer above and behind your head, and with all the copies attacking together. This adds some startup lag to the move, but like all super-charged moves, there's armor and time-slow too. Also, for aerials, Paper Mario tends to go slow-mo with the opponent, in order to more easily land the attack. Each copy will add 3% to the base 10%, for a total of 13~25%. Not only that, but the move will now spike opponents straight downward! Unless you hit while the hammer is still above Paper Mario's head, in which case it deals the same forwards KB as before but still with added damage and more knockback as a result. This is an excellent way to finish off an opponent, but it's rather tricky to land, with startup lag similar to Mario's forward aerial attack. But it is very effective, which I don't think I really need to reiterate. A neat thing you can do is copy fair -> copy fair -> super-charged fair to drag a foe offstage for the kill! It's like Jiggs' wall of pain, but even more painful. Yikes.

    Back Aerial - Hammer Spin
    For a back aerial, Paper Mario takes out his hammer and spins around a little bit, in a similar fashion to the dsmash but shortened -- he'll only spin around once, and only hit behind himself. It has pretty great reach and reasonable startup and endlag. As for damage, it deals 8% with backward knockback that KOs at around 170% from center-stage. It's got kinda high base knockback, so at low percents it won't really be good for following up with anything normally. Its landing lag, however, is quite a bit less than that of the fair, so it's good for spacing. If you have a copy perform this attack for you, it can be useful for walling out the opponent relentlessly, and for similar stuff to the fair as well like walls of pain. It's got advantages over fair thanks to increased range and quicker startup, but it has the downside of less damage (6% for copies). Also, this has the same remote-copy interaction as dsmash. It may be effective to make a remote copy, and then out of the jump afterward, use a bair to immediately hit the copy.

    Speaking of copies, the powered-up version of this move has them form a chain similarly to the powered-up dsmash, again with a similar remote copy interaction. This time though, Paper Mario will swing them back once, and then crack them like a whip! The body of clones' hitbox adds 1% per clone to a base of 2%, so 3~7% depending on the amount of clones. This hit is a natural combo into the second, whip-crack hit of the attack, which deals 4% plus 2% per clone (6~14%). The total amounts to 9~21%, which is pretty good -- especially since the second hit can KO at 120~70% from center-stage! It's pretty powerful and has a lot of reach, but the lag on both ends is pretty sizable. You should be able to catch someone off guard from afar though, with the proper reads or distractions.

    Up Aerial - Jump-percut
    Paper Mario essentially performs his up tilt, but without the hop: facing the camera, he enters the classic jumping pose as he punches above himself. It deals 7% and moderate upward knockback, the knockback being similar to Mario's uair -- perfect for juggling. It's quick to start and end, so it's great for keeping an opponent airborne. It's also a reliable follow-up, and you can land attacks after it easily enough. It may even be able to finish off an opponent near the ceiling after you drop a Spiny on them! If a copy performs this attack, it'll deal only 5% and even less knockback, which may be good for follow-ups, although the lower hitstun that accompanies lower knockback must be accounted for.

    If you use all your copies at once, you'll get a boost upward as you punch, similar to Mario's Super Jump Punch but facing the screen, and straight up. The copies will attack at different angles once you reach the top, spreading out kind of like holding a deck of cards, increasing this attack's horizontal reach the more copies you use. Each one will also add 2.5% of damage to the base 7% -- 9.5~19.5% depending on your copy count. As for knockback, it's still straight up, but increased quite a bit -- it'll KO a grounded opponent from 160~100% at the start, decreasing a little bit in power the further Paper Mario has ascended. If you hit at the start, it's most powerful since the copies are still all together -- there's also a bit of startup lag as Paper Mario crouches down and prepares to leap upward. But of course, it has super armor and slows down foes, like the other powered-up attacks. This can be used as a last-ditch recovery option, but it's not really worth it (and Lakilester does a generally better job anyway). This is, however, amazing for landing KOs near the ceiling, especially with Lakilester's Spinies to combo into the uair! You also might be able to get a stage spike while recovering with this move.

    Down Aerial - Stomp
    [​IMG]

    Paper Mario enters a sort of ducking pose in midair, as if squatting down for a jump. Landing on an opponent during this stance (which lasts about as long as nair) will cause him to jump up off of the opponent like a footstool jump, knocking the foe forward at an upward angle -- it has super-low knockback scaling, so it's very consistent, around 1.4 SBB forward with a 20* upward angle. The move will deal 8% in addition to that knockback, a decently solid bit of damage. There are some flaws to this attack though -- firstly, this has a bit of an odd hitbox. It won't beat out other attacks, aerial or not, since Paper Mario will always get hit first unless the foe's hurtbox extends past their attack's hitbox. Also, it doesn't have a lot of follow-up potential outside of partners, since Paper Mario bounces straight up. The opponent is sent forward, so you can't really get close to them. (By the way, the bounce height is about that of a short hop.)

    This attack might not seem like much on its own, and well, it's not. But with copies, it gets a lot better. Unlike most copy attacks, this has Paper Mario and his copies enter the squatting pose -- if you whiff, you do lose a copy after the squatting pose is done. You'll only deal 6% and the same knockback, but Paper Mario himself (and the rest of his copies) will bounce forward instead of upward! The one that's being expended bounces straight up though. Anyway, this is amazing for following up on the attack, since you chase the knockback automatically. You can even bounce on the foe again, and again, and again! The sky -- or rather, your copy count -- is the limit. Of course, you can also combo into other stuff, like another aerial or anything else you can throw out in time. Perhaps you could bait an air dodge and punish with a smash attack! Alternatively, use smart placement of remote copies to follow up on this (especially one that's been hit with the giant fsmash hammer; this is great for comboing into the spring upward with good timing).

    Speaking of remote copies, if you have one use this attack, it'll jump up a bit before entering the squat pose due to the nature of the attack. You can also bounce off of remote copies using the dair -- this won't use up a copy, and you're always propelled forward. It's a good mobility tool, and you can also footstool it traditionally for the trajectory you'd get by jumping on another fighter. These options won't damage the remote copy, but will squash it as if it was hit by a single-copy giant-hammer fsmash.

    [​IMG]

    If you hold the button for the super-charged version of this attack, the copies will all go on top of each other, with Paper Mario on the bottom. After hovering in midair for a moment, they'll dive straight down in a crouching pose similarly to the normal version of this attack. You can steer left or right a bit during the descent, which is around Mario's falling speed, and if they hit an opponent, they'll bounce straight up off of the foe. The foe will be dealt 10% plus 2% per clone (12~20%) and a spike! The power ranges from about half Ganon's dair spike, to 1.5x the King of Evil's stomp! It can be a OHKO if you have all your copies and land it offstage, but there are a couple of factors that balance it out -- namely, the telegraphed start-up, and the fact that you use all your copies (and need a lot of them for the OHKO). Plus, you can't stop your fall for quite some time once you start, so it's risky offstage. But if you combo into this with dairs, you might be able to read a reaction and punish it! Even onstage, this attack can be good for bouncing the foe up into another attack, although it's not often the optimal attack. If you hit a remote copy with this, you'll squish 'em like the super fsmash, same duration and all (depending on copy count of course). It's quicker than the fsmash, but you can't hit an opponent and the copy with this at the same time, so you may be left open to attack especially since the bounce sends you into the air.

    Grab Aerial - Paper Tube
    [​IMG]

    Finally, we have the grab aerial. Paper Mario will grab the copies and sling 'em in front of him as they combine into a rolled-up paper tube, telescoping forward. More copies of course make this attack longer in reach, adding about half of Toon Link's aerial Hookshot length per copy. It's a bit slower to start than other zairs, but it still has minimal landing lag. It deals 5% and moderate knockback, like Toon Link's Hookshot. This is an excellent spacing tool thanks to its potential reach and low landing lag, and like the nair and dash attack, won't use up your copies at all. It's another good way to space out the opponent while preserving copies. It can also be used for a quick recovery option, and has the same, variable range as it does when attacking.

    The zair can also be used to push remote copies along with the end of the tube. While this can push them pretty long distances, it can also be hard to control, with the danger of pushing a copy right off the stage. You can however control the length somewhat by landing in the middle of the zair, before it fully extends. Without a copy, Paper Mario can't use the zair at all, simply performing the slinging motion to no avail, although this can be canceled into anything and has no landing lag. Not actually useful though.

    GRAB GAME

    Grab - Thoreau
    [​IMG]

    For Paper Mario's grounded grab, he'll throw out Thoreau, another one of his Pixl partners from Super Paper Mario. He'll grab any opponent he runs into, making for a nice, long-ranged grab that's also quick for the amount of reach that it has. It can however still be punished if the grab is whiffed, or if the foe dodges it. Thoreau will only grab the foe on the way out and at just the start of his return trip -- so if a foe dodges the grab up close, there's a pretty big opportunity to punish. The grab doesn't use up any copies -- Paper Mario himself will hold the foe, his partners staying synced with him -- but the headbutt pummel deals .5~3% depending on how many copies you have. .5% for no copies, 3% for five copies. It's pretty quick too, so you can tack on quite a bit of damage depending on your copy count.

    The copies really get involved, though, in the throws. You can have a copy perform a throw solo by just using the control stick, allowing Paper Mario himself to act quickly and land a follow-up, or you can input it like a smash attack to initiate a super-powered version of the throw! For both of these copy-based throw types, the same rules that we've been using this whole time apply -- 3/4 the regular damage when a copy does it, you'll use all your copies when performing a powered-up throw, all that stuff. Also, you can't attack the grabbed foe while they're still in a copy's throw animation -- you'll have to wait until they get launched. Remote copies won't respond to throw inputs at all, so their ready stance won't interfere with the grab game in any real way. It is however possible to get a quick follow-up with a remote copy. To help with this, a simple input of B is enough to prepare a remote copy during a grab -- otherwise, you might accidentally down throw or something.

    By the way, your partners from sspec can come in handy a fair bit here, either keeping a foe occupied so that you can land the grab in the first place, or tacking on extra damage while they're in your grasp. They won't end the grab state if they hit, after all. However, this requires some positively on-point positioning and planning, and you don't want to get predictable. After all, if you always throw out a partner and then go for a grab, your foe will know to dodge the grab. So use this as a mix-up, not something you always do.

    Thoreau can also grab items to help bring them back to Paper Mario -- he'll automatically pick them up. This can even be done with things like Peach's turnips and Link's bombs, which can help a lot in certain matchups. Additionally, you can grab a remote copy, and Paper Mario will hold the copy above his head, like in Super Paper Mario (and Mario 2 USA). You'll be free to move around and jump, double jump, whatever; pressing the attack button will throw the remote copy forward as a projectile to deal 5% and moderate knockback as if it was falling. Alternatively, press shield or down on the control stick to place it down gently on the ground in front of you. This is a good way to reposition remote copies obviously, but may leave Paper Mario vulnerable to attacks while he's busy dealing with the remote copy. In the heat of a battle, something like having the remote copy use dtilt is usually the better option, with the obvious downside of using up one of its attacks.

    Up Throw - Toss-Up
    Paper Mario simply tosses the foe straight up, pretty much a copy-paste of Mario's uthrow. 8% and upward knockback that sends the foe rather far, but doesn't scale much with percent. There's some endlag on this throw normally, so it's not quite as fit for juggling as Mario's is. But that's what copies are for. Copies only deal 6%, but the reduced knockback and the fact that Paper Mario doesn't go through any animation makes this excellent for follow-ups. It's a combo throw in its finest form: low damage and knockback, and the quickest animation a throw has ever seen, since you're free to act right after inputting the throw. You can follow up with uair, utilt, usmash, another aerial, or even a powered-up version of something! These are harder to hit though, but if you bait and punish an air dodge, well there ya go. Or perhaps use a remote copy or partner to combo into an attack?

    If you input the throw like a smash attack -- using the control stick and attack button simultaneously, or just using the c-stick -- you'll access a powered-up version of the throw that uses up all your copies. The copies and Paper Mario will surround the foe, holding the grabbed opponent between them like a life net. Then, with their powers combined, they'll toss the foe straight up into the air! Each copy used adds 2% to the base 8% -- 10~18% total -- and the upward knockback KOs from 170~80%. It's a pretty effective KO throw depending on your copy count! (It has higher knockback scaling than the normal version of the throw, by the way.) As a general trend, the solo-copy versions of these throws lend themselves to follow-up attacks, whereas the all-copy ones are KO throws. Paper Mario by himself, when he throws an opponent, is often stuck in that awkward middle spot where his throws are not very good for either of those, but he can still make some space for himself using his throws -- a perfect opportunity to start making copies!

    Forward Throw - Hammer Golf
    [​IMG]
    Paper Mario lets go of the opponent briefly and pulls out his hammer, holding it up as if about to hit a golf ball. He'll then swing his hammer in a clean stroke, launching the foe a respectable distance (it starts to KO around 190% at the ledge, so it's not very good for killing) and dealing 10% of damage. The main difference in animation from the above gif is that Paper Mario doesn't swing around, instead performing a full proper golf stroke -- he'll also visibly "flip" around during the stroke, like the dsmash.
    If a copy performs this throw, the foe only receives 8% as well as less knockback, but of course there's all that follow-up potential. You could use a running up smash, a dash attack, a partner, a remote copy -- there's a lot of options here.

    Use the powered-up, all-copy version of this attack, and you'll wind back even more, all your copies joining together for the attack. It's got a lot more of an "oomph" to it now, dealing 2% more per copy (12~20%) and KOing at 160~90% near the ledge. It's a straight-up power buff, coming in quite handy.

    Down Throw - Ground Pound
    [​IMG]

    Paper Mario jumps up into the air about a normal jump's height, and then performs a classic ground pound motion -- this should be familiar to veterans of the Mario series, or of Yoshi's Smash Bros. moveset. It's based on Thudley's ability from Super Paper Mario. It'll deal 8% of damage and moderate upward knockback at a forward angle, which can be followed up on lower percents. At higher percents though, it's only really feasible to get a combo started out of this if a copy performs this throw. It only deals 6% when used by a copy, but less knockback for comboing. Combined with a rather long animation, this is pretty good for preparing a follow-up as a copy handles the throw!

    For the powered-up version, Paper Mario will jump up like normal, and his copies will come up from behind him, forming a tower. It's quite similar to the all-copy version of dair, but with a ground-pound motion being performed by all the copies. It deals 8% plus 2.5% per copy (10.5~20.5%), KOing at 160~80% at the same angle as the normal version. Its mainly-upwards knockback makes it consistent no matter where on the stage you happen to be, and with a lot of copies, it's a super-effective KO throw! It should be noted, though, that the foe can possibly DI forward to survive a bit longer. This throw, either version of it, can also hit other foes in a team battle or free-for-all for the same damage and knockback.

    Back Throw - Hammer Throw
    Paper Mario performs a slightly shortened version of Mario's bthrow, spinning around with the opponent before tossing the foe backwards. (During the spinning, you can see his flatness!) The toss itself deals 4% and set knockback at an upwards 40* angle, traveling about 4 SBB (weight classes may change this a bit). Paper Mario will then take out his hammer and throw it in an arc, aiming at the opponent even if they DI -- it's a guaranteed hit. The hammer deals 5%, and the throw ends up killing at about 120% at the ledge. If a copy performs this throw, you can hit the opponent before the hammer is thrown -- the copy will still auto-aim at the foe even if you knock them somewhere else, which can make for some pretty interesting combo opportunities!

    For the all-copy version, he'll throw the foe backwards again -- exactly the same as the normal version. Instead of throwing a hammer, though, Paper Mario will leap towards the opponent as the copies, while Paper Mario is flying through the air, form the same giant hammer as the one in fthrow and fsmash -- same size, damage and everything. An A button prompt will then pop up as the battle goes into slow-mo, and you'll need to time the button press just right, like an Action Command! If you're successful, he'll slam it into the foe in an overhead arc, dealing again the same damage as fthrow. Miss, and the copies will fall apart from the hammer shape, and you've wasted them. As for knockback, with 1-3 copies the knockback KOs at around 110~80% near the ledge. But with four or five copies, it's a meteor smash instead! The power of the meteor smash will of course increase with five copies compared to four, surpassing even Ganon's dair with the maximum amount! It's an extremely potent finisher near the ledge, as can be imagined. Even onstage, it can potentially KO with the bounce at high percents if your foe doesn't tech. Just be sure to get that Action Command down!

    MISCELLANEOUS

    Final Smash - Papercraft Mario
    [​IMG]

    Paper Mario got the Smash Ball! Using its power, he'll make copies like crazy, and they'll all fold up into Papercraft Mario! Five of them, though, will be underneath it, carrying it along like the Toads in the gif. The real Paper Mario will then hop on top, and you can move it around. For scale reference, it's about 6 SBB tall. Anyway, you can move around at Pit's dash speed (causing it to wobble back and forth a bit), jump with the same height as normal Paper Mario and with a midair jump too (the midair jump can cause you to turn around), as well as attack. The A button causes you to dash forward 5 SBB at Falcon's dash speed, dealing 20% and upward-forward knockback that KOs at 60% from center-stage. With a press of B, the Paper Marios at the bottom will throw Papercraft Mario up into the air, like a Super Dedede Jump but with as much horizontal distance as vertical distance (it can of course be aimed). It deals 25% both on the way up and down -- on the way up, its upward knockback KOs at 70% from the ground, and on the way down, it's a spike! This form lasts ten seconds, after which the giant papercraft unfolds into all the Paper Marios and disappears (like all copies do when used to attack). The five that were carrying it, though, get to stay -- they'll refill your copy count, conveniently enough.

    Alternate Costumes - Colored Paper
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    Paper Mario's alternate costumes are pretty standard; in order, there's the default Paper Mario, Luigi / Wario / Waluigi colors, Fire Mario, Ice Mario, a darker costume based on Paper Mario 64, and a color scheme based on the original Super Mario Bros. for NES. Hm, but it seems like there's something... missing.

    [​IMG]
    Oh, there he is. Paper Luigi will function the same as Paper Mario of course, but he has some voice clips as well. (The up smash in particular should feel familiar...) He has three additional color variations, and plus there's...

    [​IMG]
    Mr. L! Luigi's evil alter ego from Super Paper Mario makes up the other four Luigi alts. So in total, there are eight Paper Marios, four Paper Luigis, and four Mr. L costumes. That's a bargain if ever I've seen one! (By the way, the Final Smash also changes to reflect your alternate costume / palette swap.)

    But wait, there's more!


    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    If you hold Z while selecting Paper Mario before a match, the partners from Side Special will be changed to their equivalents from Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door! Meet Goombella (also featured in the Smash Taunt), Koops, and Admiral Bobbery. They act the same -- it's purely an aesthetic change.

    Order now and we'll double your offer!

    Home Stage - Battle Stage
    [​IMG]
    Are there... two Luigis?!

    Paper Mario's home stage is none other than the Battle Stage from Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door! In that game, each fight took place in a theater of sorts, with an audience that could affect the battle. In Smash, the main differences are a cardboard backdrop and platforms inspired by Super Mario Bros. 3, another Mario game which happens to be a stage show. It's a walk-off stage, and the platforms will move around, side-to-side and up-and-down. Occasionally the curtains will close and open again, revealing a different backdrop.

    The stage's main gimmick is the audience -- just like in the original game, the crowd has a role to play in Smash. If one particular fighter does really well, e.g. not getting hurt for some time, landing a long combo, or hitting multiple foes in quick succession, an audience member will throw a helpful item at them, and some applause will be heard. It's usually a healing / food item, functioning like the Isabelle Assist Trophy. Sometimes though, it'll be a different item, which can be used by any fighter but will be thrown in the direction of the one that's being cheered for. Landing a KO or performing a "Stylish" taunt will get you even more rewards!

    As for music, it consists mainly of battle and boss battle themes from both the Paper Mario series, and the other Mario RPG series too.

    Kirby Hat - Kirby's Epic Paper
    When Kirby gets ahold of Paper Mario's copying ability, he won't actually get a hat, instead becoming completely made of paper just like Paper Mario himself! He'll get Paper Mario's Copy ability as a Copy Ability, which is kinda overpowered on Kirby since he's not actually balanced around it. *ahem* Anyway, the copies work in much the same way for Kirby, except he can't perform powered-up versions of his attacks like Paper Mario can, and of course lacks the remote copy system. Still, it's a pretty nice ability to have all in all. His weight is reduced to Paper Mario's though, so copies are now rather vital to him! They'll also open up a lot of interesting combo possibilities with Kirby's repertoire of moves. Note that copies cannot perform Kirby's special moves, which is good for things like recovering with Cutter or landing with Stone. With more copies, though, these attacks are boosted in damage and knockback. His props such as Stone, Hammer, and Cutter will naturally take on a paper aesthetic as well.

    PLAYSTYLE

    Paper Mario is a strategy game, requiring smart planning, resource management, on-point timing, and daring, risky maneuvers to get you through an encounter. In Smash, Paper Mario has a very similar style. He's weak and frail on his own, being made of paper and all, so his gameplan largely revolves around copies: obtaining them, attacking with them, using them for defense, et cetera. Let's start with getting copies. This isn't the easiest thing in the world to do in the heat of a battle, since you need to go through a one-second animation (albeit one that can be canceled if things don't go according to plan). Paper Mario's partners can help him out in this regard, acting as useful projectiles to keep foes at bay while you make some copies. You can in theory have all three of your partners out at once too, but you'll need to manage them wisely, since you can't throw out a partner if they're already on the field.

    Another good way to make some space is by simply knocking the foe away with a melee attack. While risky due to your low weight and the fact that you have to get up close and personal, good use of close-up attacks can knock your foe away a far distance, buying you some time. Throws can also be quite effective for this strategy. Lakilester can also give Paper Mario a lift, getting him up in the air so that he can make copies while he falls, and even use Spiny Flip to attack foes below or make walking traps. Just make sure you're prepared to land -- you will be above your opponent, which isn't too desirable in Smash, let alone with this low of a falling speed. But Paper Mario does have some tools to help him out, like a midair dspec -- your foe might even be distracted with attacking the remote copy when it lands!

    Alright, so once you've got your copies, Paper Mario can really go to town on the opponent! But there's also an interesting choice here: do you use your copies for attack, or for defense? And if the former, do you play it safe with low-risk single-copy attacks, or do you risk it all on a super-powerful move? After all, without copies, Paper Mario is as light as, well, paper! But he's also weak if he doesn't use his copies, especially since his moveset is effectively limited (only a handful of moves can be used without using up your copies). Sometimes playing it safe just won't cut it, and you'll need to put it all on the line with that one big super-powered attack! He doesn't have a lot of KO options otherwise, after all. Other times, though, it may be wisest to use your copies for combos and the like, or just single hits, and keep them around for defensive purposes.

    Another element thrown into the mix is the remote copy mechanic, which can be used not only for offense, defense, and stage control, but also as a way to save your copies for later -- if you use an all-copy attack, you can still get a remote copy back if you planned ahead and deployed one earlier. But then there's the risk of your opponent destroying the remote copy, and the fact that you have to keep inputting dspec to activate the counter's blocking animation. There are also moves that can affect remote copies, giving them even more uses -- reposition them with grab and dtilt, protect them with dsmash and bair, move them upward with usmash, and turn them into a ticking timebomb with fsmash and dair! Just like in the Paper Mario games, the core essence of his gameplay revolves around managing your resources and time, planning ahead, good timing of your button inputs, using the various options at your disposal, and knowing when to risk it all and when to play it safe.

    Overall, Paper Mario can be described as a glass -- er, paper cannon. He's got powerful copy-based attacks, a powerful zoning / camping ability, and great combo and KO ability, but while his recovery is quite excellent, he's very easy to dispatch of if he's not careful, and he has a limited amount of "ammo." Of note is Paper Mario's ability to force an approach from his opponent: staying away with your partners and making copies may cause hastier opponents to rush in with an attack. That's your opportunity to react and punish! Paper Mario's unique powershield also plays into this quite nicely, and he can get a lot of mileage out of a punish like this thanks to his strong copy-based combo game.

    To wrap things up, Paper Mario should not be underestimated: while he may be frail and rather weak in terms of attack power, his copies give him a significant edge over his opponents. His main weakness is how he performs when he lacks any copies, with his main strength being how he performs when he does have them -- this applies in terms of combo ability, attack power, stage control, survivability, and a few other attributes. Both with and without copies, he has a powerful zoning ability and great recovery but lackluster movement speed. He's effective against foes who he can keep away for enough time to make a copy, but he may find himself struggling against those who can constantly keep the pressure up. With that said, Paper Mario is more than equipped to take on the best that Smash has to offer!
    As always, feedback is greatly appreciated, and I hope you enjoyed the set! :)

    Like what you see? See some more over at my Make Your Move Hub! :D
     
    #5 Munomario777, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2016
    Routa, Reigaheres, AEMehr and 7 others like this.
  6. Reigaheres

    Reigaheres
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    Roses are Blue, Violets are Blue, I'm Blue too

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2014
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    Location:
    Behind your local Arby's
    3DS FC:
    1461-7646-7368
    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
    Mad Dummy

    I am a ghost that lives inside a DUMMY. My cousin used to live inside a DUMMY, too. Until...
    You destroyed their home! Or did you just talk to them? What even was his name again!? Either way, the ghost living in this training dummy wants revenge for their cousin, and it's directed to you! A dummy that really needs anger management classes, the Mad Dummy inhabits the Trash Zone in Waterfall in the game Undertale. In said game, the player can't them hurt due to them being a ghost, with your attacks only being able to hit the dummy and not the ghost, but since in Smash Bros the objective isn't to murder the opponent on the spot but instead knock them offstage, the Mad Dummy can fit in with the roster, being always knocked away alongside its vessel and still being able to be KO'ed by Blast Zones.
    Like most enemies in Undertale, the Mad Dummy can utilize magic in the form of bullet hell-like attacks, attacking with miniature dummies which shoot out magic blasts and fall from the borders of the bullet box. These end up being unreliable thanks to their homing magic being redirected towards the Mad Dummy and serving as his weakness. After being damaged enough times, the Mad Dummy even fires the unreliable bullets, but the replacements he gets still end up against them.
    The Mad Dummy probably only used their revenge for his cousin as an excuse to beat up the protagonist, especially considering that with their human soul, the Mad Dummy could get out of the Underground and reach the surface, although, according to them, the only thing they would've done would stand around in a window and look fancy, though really, you can't do much as a living dummy. Enough of that, let's get to the set. Set! SET!

    Stats. Stats! STATS!
    [​IMG]
    Size: 3/10
    Weight: 5/10
    Ground Speed: 5/10
    Aerial Speed: 5/10
    Aerial Control: 8/10
    Fall Speed: 4/10
    Traction: 10/10

    The Mad Dummy's stats are all pretty average, at a height and width a bit smaller than Mario, but with a slight levitation from the ground making them a bit taller, with the floating also causing super low hitting moves to not even hit the Mad Dummy, though still making them activate traps if they passes over them. The Mad Dummy's crouch certainly unique, as instead of just ducking, the Mad Dummy will fall to the ground and also lower its body segments on top of each other, causing the Mad Dummy look like an actual, non-floating dummy! Well, the Mad Dummy still can't urge to bob and move a bit, but at least they tried! Weight-wise, the Mad Dummy is average, as while its vessel shouldn't be too heavy, considering it gets flown around a lot and gets thrown all around by attacks, the Mad Dummy's vessel is, well, a training dummy, which are made to receive a good whallop and not just to be defeated in one hit, so Mad Dummy still can receive a beating without being launched around too much, but you still gotta have an eye out for them.

    Movement-wise, the Mad Dummy is still pretty average, with a grumpy look to their pace, they floats around at the same regular speed for both their aerial and ground movement, although, like the way they float around in their boss fight, the Mad Dummy's aerial acceleration is pretty top notch, with their traction being the best in the game, beating even Lucario at it. Taking this into consideration, the Mad Dummy is a character that while with average speed when moving, has mad momentum capabilities, with tight controls to ensure they focus on their adversary and good aerial acceleration that make them adept enough at moving through the air.

    Specials. Specials! SPECIALS!

    Side Special: Magic Shot
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    Like the many monsters of Undertale, the Mad Dummy attacks with bullet hell-like attacks, which fittingly enough are also dummies. Unlike some other monsters, which may have their bullets be representations of their own attacks or just bullets, the Mad Dummy has it plainly stated that their bullets are indeed beings working for them, with flavor text in battle stating of them bossing around their bullets and even at one point firing and replacing them.
    So that I won't have to repeat myself later, know that the the dummy minions the Mad Dummy utilizes in his set are about as tall as Olimar's Pikmin without their head plant growth and a bit less wide than a Kirby.

    On a regular input, the Mad Dummy shouts out a differing command for one of his dummies to attack, usually something like "Attack you dummy!" (wait, is that a complement?). Half-way through the phrase, a dummy minion, who is probably already accustomed with his angry boss's banter to not need to hear the full phrase to get the memo, rises out of the ground in front of the Mad Dummy (or appears in front of them if in the air) and proceeds to shoot a red ball of magic that looks like a bunch of scribbles, like the ones in the gif above. While a dummy will almost instantly shoot a magic ball after being summoned, one summoned in the air will fall down at the speed of the Mad Dummy and will only shoot a magic ball the moment it lands on the ground. This move has some noticeable and a bit chunky end lag to it, as the Mad Dummy will still want to finish their command even with the dummy already out, lagging the move out and not making it easy to abuse.

    The magic shot by a dummy is the size of a Smart Bomb and moves at a slow sped. When launched, the magic ball will home its direction towards the nearest foe, although only homing for the shot, after which just going forward at the aimed direction. A magic ball travels at a speed only a bit faster than Villager's dash speed, and while travelling a pretty good distance of one FD before disappearing, dealing 3% damage and vertical knockback that can KO at 250%, enemies can easily dodge this projectile and can even attack it to make it disappear, also doing such once it touches solid ground, besides pass-through platforms. Worst of all, if the Mad Dummy is hit by a magic shot, they themselves will receive 3% damage and be pushed away 1 SBB as they are shown having their dummy body's parts shaking about. So, what gives with this move?

    A dummy will stay in its spot after shooting their magic, with 10 stamina and only receiving damage from attacks, damaging foes who pass by them them but with only 2% damage with no hitstun. Up to 5 dummies can be placed around on the stage, and by tilting this move's input you can even have them come out of the underside of platforms. After their initial magic blast, the dummies on stage will stay as turret-like obstacles, shooting another magic blast 2.5 seconds after the first blast and so on with the same time gap between every shot, which while not too impressive with just one dummy around, can get chaotic with enough dummies and setup. If the Mad Dummy manages to get five dummies out, the lag that comes from summoning another minion will likely mean that the newly created dummy will have a different timing to their shots when compared to the previous and as such can create a certain unpredictability with the order of shots, potentially turning the battlefield into a bullet-hell war zone, truly the greatest vengeance for your cousin! Although, as said before, this comes from immense setup and dedication, so a careless Mad Dummy player will surely share the anger of their character if they set up their dummies only to have them be destroyed by the opponent, so it is important to play defensive to protect your dummies and to retain your minion momentum.

    By holding the input instead of just tapping, or by inputting the move with 5 dummies already out, the Mad Dummy will spurt out some irate command for their minions to shoot already, dangit! This will cause all dummies around to, half-way through the Mad Dummy's command, in unison each shoot a magic ball. This can of course be devastating with five dummies around, with many projectiles around at the same time all targeting an opponent, but just like in the boss fight, this can end up backfiring on the Mad Dummy if the foe is smart enough to bait or knock them in the way of the bullets, easily causing the Mad Dummy to rack up a lot of damage onto themselves and also leave a mighty big opening for the opponent to punish them, though the command itself being rather laggy and as such something that you really just can't spam.

    Neutral Special: YOU'RE ALL BEING REPLACED!!
    [​IMG]
    The Mad Dummy has had it with these incompetent dummies, I mean, all they do is stay in place and occasionally shoot some magic that hurts him! They're failures. Failures! FAILURES! On input, the Mad Dummy will, with a spastic animation shout "Dummies! Failures! You're fired! You guys are being replaced!" before the move ends with very little lag on both ends.

    If there are any dummies on the battlefield, when the Mad Dummy starts shouting, they will all continue shooting but will also dart their attention towards their boss, though will all retreating back into the stage at the mention of being fired, sinking back with a disgruntled face, replacing their usual dot-eyed look.

    If the Mad Dummy has no dummies on the field, a group of 10 dummies, which includes dummies from attacks besides the Mad Dummy's SSpec, will be called in and rise from the ground around the Mad Dummy in unison, all crowded together to stretch 1 SBB to both sides of the Mad Dummy and dealing their usual 2% dummy damage, although opponents hit by them while they rise will actually take slight vertical knockback, which while unable to KO, can string fairly well into other dummies in the huddle, which can act as a pseudo-counter at times towards foes who try to attack the defenseless Mad Dummy while they do the animation for the move, which can take about 1 second to finish.
    The Mad Dummy can also pause the move and split it into two parts by shielding, rolling or dodging at around a bit after they shout that the dummies are fired, at which point a second input will finish the move for good. This technique, while great for retreating from an attack, dodging or even attacking, isn't one to be used every time you fire your dummies, as alongside getting real predictable if spammed, during the time in between the two inputs, the Mad Dummy will be unable to use their Side Special and other dummy minion-based moves, so especially considering their Side Special is their bread and butter, when you play the Mad Dummy you should try and reserve splitting the input for when you know it will both be effective and that you can later safely finish the move.
    [​IMG]
    Now, what are these replacements the Mad Dummy has issued to replace their dummies? Well, dummy-bots! With a steel and more angular look, these metal manequins are equal in size as regular dummies, and will replace them in every move that utilizes them

    While you may think that a robotic dummy will be ultimately better than your usual fluffy dummy due to replicating their moves with robotic and advanced copies, both kinds of dummies have their ups and downs to their moves and their time and place in Mad Dummy's playstyle, and while a potential wrong usage of switching dummies to robotic ones can give worse results than with regular dummies (These guys are even WORSE than the other guys!), a correctly used switch, just when you're needing a dummy-bot, can potentially be much rewarding, so with correct usage, one can play a Mad Dummy with a great control over what they can use at the moment and what their playstyle can offer.
    This move can of course also be used with dummy-bots as your minions, firing them and rehiring the old dummies, though with some altered dialogue of the Mad Dummy begging their dummies to come back.
    Robotic Side Special: Magic Missile
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    One of the more obviously changed moves in the Mad Dummy's arsenal and also one of the more different ones, with dummy-bots around, the Mad Dummy yells "Dummy-Bots! Magic Missile!" as a dummy-bot ascends out of the ground in front of the dummy or appears in the air in front of them halfway through the sentence due to the robot still copying the regular dummy.

    After rising out of the ground or below a platform, a dummy-bot will then proceed to attack like their cottony counterpart, fulfilling their boss's order and soon after being spawned turn in a puff of smoke into rocket ship-like missiles the same size as a regular dummy-bot, with a noticeable pink circle in the middle of its mostly white appearance, a new, mass-produced, dummy-bot then rising out of the ground where the old robot was, 2.5 seconds later then turning into a Magic Missile with a new dummy-bot soon rising in its place, continuing the cycle. By charging this move you can still have all mecha-dummies shoot in unison, but in addition, if a player doesn't want to waste previous setup with regular dummies, they can charge the move with no mecha-dummies on the field to have the Mad Dummy shout to their dummy-bots that their filling in the old dummy's spots as in unison a dummy-bot appears in each of the old dummy's positions, with said robots even spacing their shootings like the old minions, meaning you can still continue past setup.

    Due to their mechanical efficiency, a Magic Missile will home towards the nearest foe for its whole existence and follow them at the speed of one of Samus' Charge Shots, dealing 3% to foes hit by it with the same general knockback as a magic ball, and while being able to have 5 passive homing projectiles seems a tad overpowered, there are some decractors, like magic missiles being unable to do sharp turns and need to move half-circles to keep up with foes, while a single attack or hitting a wall being is able to destroy a missile in a comical non-damaging puff of dust-like explosion, which can also damage other missiles in the near radius so that another explosion will destroy them for good, foes being able to as such domino your missiles into almost-nothing until the next batch. The Mad Dummy will also still receive the same damage and everything from a magic missile

    Another main drawback of this move is related to the pink circle on the missiles, as it will get smaller and smaller during the missile's run until 2 second after it was created, wherein the circle completely disappears and the Magic Missile loses its homing abilities completely, continuing going forward the direction it was facing when the circle disappeared and slowly losing its speed until it explodes after going a platform away and getting slower than a magic ball, truly making Magic Missiles a "hit now, not later!" kind of move.

    While we'll soon see that both of the Mad Dummies' minions' projectiles can be influenced and interacted with a number of the Mad Dummy's moves, dummy-bot magic missiles aren't nearly as effective to control around and influence as regular magic balls, as while they are fast and track adversaries, the magic ball's slower nature means that during their run they can be toyed around and controlled much better, something that can't be done much with magic missiles due to their short existance, with their speed being a bit too much at times for the Mad Dummy to do much other than have them around to annoy foes, losing a lot of the move's stage controlling charm. However, you can't lie about how magic missiles are pretty great projectiles on their own right, and can still be essencial during certain fights for their quick and following nature, being pretty great for trying to get openings at higher percentages or getting ranged damage also during such period, considering that they don't need the Mad Dummy to intervene or create too many dummy-bots for them to not be super-slow projectiles. During early game, magic missiles can also be used before the battle really picks up by having them be your general annoyer move, and with the Mad Dummy's bread and butter duality you can certainly find good combos or techniques utilizing both kinds of dummies.

    Down Special: Who're you calling a Dummy?
    [​IMG]
    The Mad Dummy uses the fact that their vessel is, well, a resistant training dummy and uses it for its original and designated usage and drop down to the ground at a speed quicker than the crouch, with an aerial version having them fall down as the move goes at their usual fall speed. The Mad Dummy will also drop their segments on top of one another and just like in their crouch will try to imitate the state of a regular dummy, with the focus the Mad Dummy puts towards the move causing them to not move an inch, similar to the state the Mad Dummy is encountered when first found in its area. You can even see their focused and twitching eyes as try to stand still! A sparkle can also be seen dinging as the Mad Dummy starts the move, with the move taking as long as a Marth Counter to finish and ending with the Mad Dummy rising back to the air and returning to their grumpy idle. This move can be executed during a dash to cause the Mad Dummy slide after they fall to the ground in their dummy-pose, causing the Mad Dummy to slide about 1.5 SBBs before stopping and later ending the move.

    Now, don't think of this as just some lame counter straight from an anime swordsman, as the move is more than that, as opponents who hit the Mad Dummy with an attack during their dummy stance will not deal any damage at all to the enfuriated dummy, not even knocking them! The Mad Dummy can then attack to cancel the dummy state while the foe suffers from their move's end lag and having their attack end up as a whiff, with it especially being potent if they're in the crossfire of a couple of magic blasts or missiles. The Mad Dummy can also continue holding down the button input to continue imitating a regular dummy, which can get handy with traps or projectiles about to hit you after you block the opponent, with the Mad Dummy still being able to cancel this into an action but also having a bit of lag compared to the almost lagless non-held stance cancelling. The Mad Dummy will get worse and worse at resisting hits the more their continue blocking, being pushed back an SBB and receiving 1/3 of the damage the attack would normally deal if they're hit by a second attack, and a third attack already causing 1/3 the knockback to the Mad Dummy and dealing half the designated damage, and even if you continue after that, all the dummy stance's resistances will go away about 1.1 second after a prolonged stance is initiated, with anything after that just being the Mad Dummy standing in place like a sitting duck just waiting to be hit. If the Mad Dummy extends their guarding by the 1.1, next time they resist an attack they'll take the hit as if it were a second attack, with the same damage and push, a side-effect of this abuse that lasts 4 seconds until the Mad Dummy can use the move to its fullest again, with an "abused" usage of the move not having the sparkle lighting up at its start.
    [​IMG]
    If an attack that deals 15%+ damage to the Mad Dummy during this move, the impact will be so strong on the concentrating dummy that all their dummy pieces will fly up to the air before falling onto the ground in a pile of pieces similar to in the gif above, always hitting the opponent with one of the pieces for the same damage and knockback that the opponent's move would deal with additional freeze-frames, which can be pretty devastating considering the % needed for this to activate. The Mad Dummy's vessel parts will all fall to the ground to then shortly after be pulled back in by the Mad Dummy's ghost towards their original spot, getting put back together after hitting the opponent when used in the air, to not cause something stupid like the body parts getting thrown off the blast zone. Since the Mad Dummy is not the training dummy being thrashed around, but the ghost inhabiting it, they are still around and well while the dummy is thrashed about, meaning that they can still attack while the opponent falls prey to the counter, as long as the move doesn't use the dummy vessel to attack for obvious reasons, being able to on the spot attack the foe while already turned to their direction. While this as a counter is weaker at killing than others, the fact that the Mad Dummy can yell for their dummies to shoot at the opponent while dealing nice knockback and damage to boot can make this better than that of those flimsy flameshield swordsmen, while still being something that needs the setup and momentum circulating the dummy shots to function, alternatively the Mad Dummy can cancel the counter into a tilt or something to start a... combo? Yeah, you heard it here first, counter-to-tilt cancelled combo folks.

    Last but not least, this moves plays surprisingly quite a lot into the Mad Dummy's dummy bullet play. First off, the move actually gives the Mad Dummy something to counter stray bullets that can hurt him, as if the Mad Dummy does a dummy guard and any of his bullets hit them, they will deflect them, with the bullet being reflected back in the same speed they were before and at a radial angle dependent on where on the Mad Dummy they hit. This leads to the second point, that being that this is the Mad Dummy's bigger ways to go ahead and mix up the way bullets go and adapt their bullets to where the opponent is positioned. Foe just rolled away from a magic ball that was going to hit them? Swoop in and reflect the ball with the lower side of your body to angle it right back at them! This also much more clearly shows the difference between magic balls and missiles, as a magic ball's slow nature means that it can be tinkered around much more by angling it, with a juggling of various magic balls creating a very risky but also very threatening bullet hell for the opponent, while a Magic Missile's quick nature usually making it only being able to be reflected once, and that usually just being shoving the missile into the opponent while they do their u-turn or trying to (also) shove the Magic Missile onto the foe by using its few frames of bitter usefulness as its circle has disapeared, which can't compete much with what you can do with this move with the magic ball.

    Up Special: Mannequin Madness
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    The Mad Dummy starts madly bopping their segments, more so than they do normally do and like the gif above. The Mad Dummy shortly after starts moving while angrily exuding their wrath in any cardinal direction selected with the joystick, and with no selected direction going forward when on the ground and upwards if in the air, with the Mad Dummy's own rage propelling itself up into the air. By pressing the special button again, the Mad Dummy will pause in their last spastic animation as they then get a tired look after all that rambling and return to idle, though in the air they won't be able to use this attack again.

    With no interruptions, the Mad Dummy can move up to 2.5 Battlefield platforms in the selected direction and only that direction, starting at a speed slightly faster than their regular dash but 1/4 into the move picking up their speed, getting faster and faster at bobbing and more insane at that, speeding up as they do so to the point where halfway through the move they're the speed of a dashing Yoshi and by the end of the move, which by that point has the Mad Dummy frantically throwing around pieces of their vessel like in the gif below, the enfuriated dummy travels at Greninja's dash speed. This move also has a hitbox in just about all of the Mad Dummy, with their frantic bops from their vessel damaging foes for 4% damage each hit, knocking them away vertically a usually small distance, potentially being hit various times, especially in the air, making this move good for approaching when used on the ground and for warding off adversaries. Since at later stages of the move the Mad Dummy's flinging their body parts around, this increases the move's range by relatively a lot, with dummy parts being able to be launched during their animation up to 1 SBB.
    [​IMG]
    This is generally a pretty good recovery move, being able to cover a pretty good distances for the Mad Dummy, who already has solid Air Control. This recovery still has its problems though, mainly in the form of it only being able to go in a straight-line, which makes recovering horizontally when not at ledge height a pain, though the fact that the Mad Dummy doesn't enter helpless when this move ends means that it can still get resolved a bit if the double jump is not used yet. While the move picks up its pace later on and gets pretty fast, when starting it, the Mad Dummy is pretty slow, so unlike some lightning-quick recoveries out there the opponent can much easier gimp the Mad Dummy during this state, which can really hurt their recovery potential.


    Smashes. Smashes! SMASHES!
    Forward Smash: Shoot, you Dummy!
    The Mad Dummy shouts "And shoot!" or some similar phrase as a dummy(-bot) emerges from the ground, which shortly after will do as commanded and attack. A dummy will shoot a Kirby-sized ball of compressed magic, bigger and less scribble-looking than a passive magic ball and with a trail-like look behind it. Such magic ball will travel much faster than a regular magic ball, being shot at the speed of a dashing Toon Link in a straight line, with the dummy's short height making it go pretty close to the ground, disappearing after travelling .5 to 1.5 battlefield platforms, dealing 11-15% damage with horizontal knockback that can only KO at 160-130%, generally being good for some ranged damage that won't follow some angling rule and always go forward, with decent knockback to boot.

    If the Mad Dummy's minions are dummy-bots, one will similarly rise from the ground, shortly after turning into a Magic Missile pointing forwards which then shoots forward at the astonishing speed of a dashing Meta Knight for 0.7-1.7 platforms before exploding in a more lethal looking version of the usual missile explosion, which disperses in a Bumper-sized explosion. The missile deals 10-14% damage to opponents with horizontal knockback that KOs at 180-150% damage, which while weaker than the power of a concentrated magic ball, has the explosion at its apex, which will actually end up dealing damage to foes for 15-21% and vertical knockback that can KO at around 120-100% damage, so while not having the same damage throughout the move's duration and less effectiveness at point blank as a dummy FSmash, if you can keep your distance this can be a fairly good ranged option.

    If there are any dummies in a 1/3 of FD radius of the Mad Dummy while they charge this move, they will all sink into the ground and appear in front of the Mad Dummy, huddling together with the existing dummy, who will appear during the charging and not just appear when it's released. Depending on the number of additional dummies, this can increase a projectile exponentially, a 2 dummy magic ball dealing 12-17% damage and a 6 dummy magic ball dealing 16-22% while KOing foes at 130-100% damage, with the magic ball increasing in size due to more collective magic being used to form it, with a 6 dummy magic ball being double a usual concentrated magic ball's size.

    After this move is finished, all the dummies will sink back into the ground and return to their original position, with the same spacing between shots as before, almost as if the smash attack only paused their shooting. Dummy-Bot's will also help their fellow bot when charging, with them all attacking by turning into missiles but hudling into a bunch that's barely bigger than a single missile, talk about compact! Dummy-Bot bundles will always deal 1% less damage on non-explosion impact when compared to their regular dummy counterpart, but their explosions continue to be potent, a 2 dummy-bot explosion dealing 16-22% and a 6 dummy-bot explosion dealing a devastating 20-28% damage with vertical knockback that KOs at 100-80% damage, being the Mad Dummy's strongest smash but also the hardest to pull off, with you needing to first set up 5 relatively close dummy-bots and then fully charge this move while your dummy-bot coverage is gone due to them being part of the move, with foes being able to attack said extra dummies while charging.

    Down Smash: Falling Dummies
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    The Mad Dummy looks up and bends their lower two body segments a bit. Soon after, in the air in front of the Mad Dummy as around their own height off the ground phases in from the air itself, utilizing bullet hell logic and a bit of magic, three side-by-side upside down dummies, who appear seemingly staying in place with also magic I guess. After appearing, the dummy nearest to the Mad Dummy proceeds to then falls at the quick speed of Shiek's Falling Speed straight down, sinking into the ground and passing right through it, dealing 14-19% damage to foes hit by it with horizontal knockback that KOs at 160-130%. Almost instantly after the first dummy falls onto the ground, the middle dummy will soon follow by doing the same as its predecessor with the last dummy doing the same, ending the move with the farthest dummy sinking into the stage. The number of dummies make this move have some nice range, which is nice when also considering this move is pretty fast and doesn't have much end lag, even if with a lot of startup lag.

    When this move is used with dummy-bots, it will still have a trio of dummy-bots appear out of the air and fall downwards, the difference being that like with the Forward Smash, the dummy-bots won't deal as much damage as regular dummies, maybe because they're made of kid friendly metal or possibly because of some monster metal conspiracy, either way they'll only deal 12-17% and knockback that KOs at 190-160%. The final dummy-bot in this downwards dummy-bot armada will transform into a Magic Missile the moment it's programmed to fall, pointing downwards and rocketing at Fox's fall speed straight downwards, dealing instead 16-22% damage with horizontal knockback that KOs at 120-90%, and while the Magic Missile's explosion once it touches the ground is as non-lethal as a regular homing Magic Missile's explosion, it still retains the FSmash's idea of you wanting to use this from a distance to get the sweetspot, which if correctly used can be great at late-game.

    If used next to a ledge, the dummies will disappear once they reach the height of the ledge, to avoid stupid edge-guards or the like, although even then this move still manages to be good for edge-guarding, especially if the opponent is occupied with dummy projectiles

    Just like the FSmash, if any dummy(-bots) are in a 1/3 FD radius from the Mad Dummy while they charge the move, they will all sink almost all of their body into the stage, being forced to stop shooting. On release of the charge they fully sink into the stage and probably go to wherever the heck the falling dummies were before falling and proceed to take action the moment the last dummy of the trio falls onto the ground and is supposed to end the move, with one of the field dummies then continuing the move by falling out of the air in the same spot as the first and closest dummy, falling just like them but at a slightly faster speed while the next dummies continuing the original order. The fourth and fifth dummies will create the last and final round, which is faster than the second but with only two dummies, with the move ending once the final dummy falls to the ground. When it comes to dummy-bots, the third dummy in the second round will still be a Magic Missile, while the third round's second and last dummy is also a Magic Missile, making it so you can potentially bomb 3 Magic Missiles with this move and in general create a bunch of hitboxes in front of you for the opponent to fear.

    Up Smash: Dummy Totem
    A dummy(-bot) appears in front of the Mad Dummy like in their FSmash as they soon jut upwards into the air at a quick speed to reveal that they're on top of two other dummies and, in a totem formation, pop out of the ground to attack opponents. Their combined height are only barely the height of the Mad Dummy so sadly this doesn't have the best hitbox height, not even hitting above the Mad Dummy. These dummies will deal regardless of their type 16-22% to adversaries and can KO from its vertical knockback at around 150-120%. After all in the dummy totem have risen, they will together sink back into the ground and end the move, the Mad Dummy can only move and act a bit before the dummies sink back to the ground, suffering what is probably the worst end lag of the smashes which gets pretty bad considering the move's range.

    However, while the vanilla version of this move barely hits above the Mad Dummy and has pretty bad reach, just like the above Smashes, this move can be much improved by dummies in the field. If there are any dummies in the one-third FD radius of the Mad Dummy while they charge the move, which still has the dummy pop up at its beginning, the field dummies or mecha-dummies will all sink back to only have half their bodies out like in the Down Smash interaction, though still uncovered enough to continuing to shoot their projectiles, with new dummy-bots that come after a magic missile is shot already popping in half buried. On release of the charge, all dummies will quickly sink into the ground as the smash attack's dummy totem trio rises, with the sunken field dummies shortly after rising below the dummy stack and becoming part of it, potentially increasing the move's vertical range by plenty if you had 5 dummies on the field, as it will create a tower equal to 8 sproutless pikmins stacked atop each other, reaching a height that's higher than even double the Mad Dummy's height, the Up Smash's range being only second to Palutena's stupidly tall Up Smash, making this move a godly anti-air if the setup before was established, while still being pretty great even with a dummy or two in the stage by being a good enough aerial-hitting option, the move's disjointed nature itself having its perks sometimes.

    As loyal and probably underpayed as they are, field dummies in the totem will continue their sharp-shooting even when stacked like a cotton sandwich, continuing their timed shots while the dummy totem rises and even while its sinking back in, as dummies in the higher segments of the totem will still have time to shoot a projectile, though the original dummy trio, which stands on top of all the other hard-working dummies, won't shoot any projectiles during the attack, possibly due to not knowing these fancy dummy magic attacks or how to turn into a missile. Either way, you can use this to your advantage if the opponent is too distant to the dummies, as you won't be needing to bring them to the dummies to have a better chance to hit them and can just bring the dummies to them!

    Standards. Standards! STANDARDS!
    Jab: Dummy's Rage
    For a two-hit jab, a first input of the move will have the Mad Dummy bob their head forward in a downwards quarter-circle like arc with of course a very infuriated look. The move ending with their head at around middle section height and some good range especially for something like a jab, although its speed isn't nothing too impressive. Though granted it would be pretty hard to do one of those multi-head jabs by arching your head around. Opponents hit by the Mad Dummy's head will receive your usual jab 3% damage, not having much at all in terms of knockback but still having the hitstun to help lock foes for the second hit.

    For a second hit, the Mad Dummy will contort their head back to how they were once before, only to almost instantly after now bob forward their lower section instead of their upper one, arching forward at around the same speed and range as before but now with their lowest dummy section and also arching from below to above in a quarter circle like movement, of course. The added base at the end of the dummy part will slightly increase the move's range too and act as a sweetspot, as while the fluffed fabric of the dummy body will still deal 3% damage with some slight vertical knockback that'd only KO at unreasonable percentages, the plastic/steel/magic alloy of the base causes an opponent hit by it to receive 6% damage and vertical knockback that's... slightly higher than a regular hit's and still won't KO until rather high percentages, and while this does mean that this probably won't be KOing, the higher knockback is much more acceptable for starting combos or the like. It's a bit tricky to connect into this sweetspot from a first hit, but maybe with a magic ball kicking the opponent back a bit they'd be just in sweetspot range?

    Dash Attack: Tantrum
    From their dash, the Mad Dummy starts having an Up Special-like tantrum, although, instead of the extreme bobbing, the enraged dummy will move forward while madly spinning around their dummy sections, also slightly bumping them around up and down and irregularly moving them around at times, going forward 2 SBBs before the Mad Dummy ends the move and the dash in the process, going forward at the speed of Toon Link's dash speed, which while not straying away too much from the Mad Dummy's regular dash speed is still noticeably faster. Opponents hit by the dashing dummy will be pushed by them as they receive a flurry of up to 4 hits of 2% damage, with a final 3% dealing hit right before the Mad Dummy finishes the move, being presented as a quick and erratic headbutt forward, which'll knock foes away horizontally with killing potential at around 170% damage, although connecting all hits can shorten this to around the 160 mark.

    If a dummy(-bot) is in the Mad Dummy's way while they rage on, they will feel their boss' unbridled RAGE! -or in other words, will have an annoyed look in there face as they only get pushed along in front of their boss until the Mad Dummy ends the move and also causes the dummies to of course stop where they were pushed, not receiving any damage possibly because they don't get paid enough for this ****. If you are ever not satisfied with one of your dummy's current placement, you can use this as a means to do so, with the move itself having low startup lag and only having faults in the form of its end lag. You can also push various dummies, and while you can't push them off the ledge and be a meanie and also a blockhead for wasting your setup, due to them not falling off ledges, this move's purpose of getting dummies closer or farther from enemies and even grouping them up is more than useful.

    Side Tilt: Dummybutt
    The Mad Dummy shouts angrily "Attack!" as a dummy rises out of the ground in front of them, their head angled forward ans they come of the ground while doing a rather cute looking headbutt, jumping into the air in a 65 degree angle at the speed of Pikachu's dash, headbutting until reaching one dummy higher than the Mad Dummy's height and disappearing. The mechanized version of this move isn't changed in the slightest beyond the different performer, the robotized dummy still headbutting away.

    Opponents hit by the headbutting dummy will only receive 6% damage by the poor mannequin minion, being knocked away horizontally but with high vertical angling due to the direction of the dummy. While this move is a bit weak for a tilt, only KOing at 220%, it does cover a good area, passing by the Mad Dummy's front hurtbox and even going a bit above that, potentially having a few anti-air functions if you want to hit adversaries in front of you and in the air. This move has very little lag on both sides of the spectrum, which considering that the move itself doesn't take that long to complete and also has the Mad Dummy be able to move around the moment the dummy jumps away means that you can get it out at times to deal basic damage to foes and maybe throw them into the bullet fire.

    If a headbutting dummy encounters a magic ball during its jump, it will pass right through it, inheriting its magic with a scribble-like aura around it for the remainder of the move, which will power up the dummy to deal 3 hits of 4% damage to opponents it pushes along, the final hit of the move knocking them away and killing them at 150%, potentially making this quite a powerful tilt if you have already made the battlefield swarmed with magic balls, although it is preferable that you hit magic balls while early in the move, as if too late you can have the dummy end up disappearing before the final knockback dealing hit is dealt.

    Dummy-bots will explode when they hit a magic missile alongside said projectile, causing an explosion a bit smaller than the FSmash one that will straight up deal the same 12% damage a powered up dummy will deal but in one hit, that can KO at 130%, and while KOing sooner also has the player have the need to strategize to place the foe at the area close to the explosion, as the explosion won't move unlike its counterpart.

    Either way, this move can combine rather nicely with the next move...

    Up Tilt: Magic Spark/Magic Rocket
    The Mad Dummy tilts their head to almost completely face upwards and angrily point their body upwards as from the ground emerges a dummy at the Mad Dummy's side and in the same 2D lane as their boss, all of this causing a bit of lag for the move. Shortly after rising out of the ground, the dummy, who's head faces upwards like their boss, proceeds to shoot their minion type's signature projectile, although with a bit of an alteration in the style of their projectile.
    A dummy will shoot a magic ball that we'll be referring as a "magic spark", such ball is yellow unlike a regular ball's red coloring and has less scribbles in its composition, these however are more powerful than regular magic balls, dealing 6% electric damage to opponents with vertical knockback that KOs at 170%. The projectile itself is still a tad slow but faster than a magic ball, moving at the speed of dashing Lucas and disappearing after going half an SBB above the Mad Dummy's head. Such half SBB being the only general area that the projectile will even hit you due to the dummy's model overlapping the Mad Dummy's from the 2D Smash perspective. This bullet is also weak magic-wise enough to not damage the Mad Dummy.

    A dummy-bot, on the other hand, will as per usual transform into a Magic Missile, though with a more squarish and even more rocket-looking missile, which we'll be fittingly enough calling a "Magic Rocket". This missile will still deal damage to adversaries who hit it for the same damage and knockback as its Magic Spark counterpart, still not damaging the Mad Dummy and also still exploding harmlessly when reaching half an SBB away from the Mad Dummy. Strangely enough, this compact missile is actually a bit slower than your usual Magic Missile, but this has its perks...
    Both the Magic Spark and the Magic Rocket can be used to follow up their fellow FTilt, as beyond the slight startup lag on the UTilt, you can catch a headbutting dummy as early as a bit after it's half-way through its headbutt, with both projectiles from this tilt interacting with the dummy like a turret dummy's would, besides a couple minor differences like the dummy gaining a yellow scribbly aura from a Magic Spark and dealing electric damage when hitting foes (which can actually get important when considering next move).

    While this combo seems like something that would be spammed a lot in battle, both the dummy and the magic ball can be damaged to be destroyed in a single hit, with destroying one of the two or the both of course disrupting the combo. Something to note too, while on the same tangent about damaging the Mad Dummy's tilts is that while magic'd a dummy will actually have your usual weak armor, resisting any attacks that deal 7% or less, neato!
    Of note though is that while the sparks or rockets can work like regular magic balls or missiles enough for them to still affect Side Tilt dummies, they're still weak enough when it comes to their composition that they will only disappear if faced with moves in the Mad Dummy's arsenal that interact with magic projectiles, like the DSpec, as to not go against the purpose of the Mad Dummy filling the battlefield with bullets.

    Down Tilt: Falling Dummy
    The Mad Dummy tilts its head to look slightly into the air above as a Mad Dummy above the ground soon falls out of the air itself, like in the Down Smash, an upside-down dummy, falling downwards at the speed of DK's fall speed with no pause at all in the whole process, making it less laggy to start than a Down Smash but slower when falling and with way less range, also having a chunk of end lag. This dummy will deal 6% damage to opponents that are hit by it and will knock grounded opponents away vertically and spike and likely bounce into the air aerial foes, although like in the Down Smash the dummy won't pass the height of a ledge before disappearing, though the move can still generally work if you want to use it for edge-guarding, though the move won't be KOing until early 200%. The dummy will also squirm a bit once it touches the ground, struggling to enter it and only sinking in after a couple frames, though this doesn't change much of the move, other than the start of the dummy's struggling being the point where you can act out of this move, which is a good visual indicator.

    If your current minions are dummy-bots, the dummy-bot that appears will cut to the chase and fall down already as a magic missile, which is only a bit slower than a falling dummy from a Down Smash but deals only 5% damage on contact, though like with the FSmash, once the Magic Missile touches the ground, its robotic clone nature will cause it to try to copy what a regular dummy would do when it touches the ground and try to squish into it instead of exploding already, which ends up causing it to shortly after explode in a way more powerful than the harmless explosion in the DSmash, but also in a rather small explosion due to only half of it sticking out. Either way, this explosion will deal 9% damage, and will always deal vertical knockback that can KO at 165%, which is pretty good for a tilt but also pretty hard to hit, the fact that dummy-bots aren't going to be used for the majority of the match also meaning this isn't going to appear much.

    To finish the inter-connections between the tilts, if a falling dummy falls by a dummy from an FTilt, it will take the headbutting dummy along with it for the fall. This will cause both dummies to fall faster and now deal 8% damage with the same knockback. This techniques has its uses, for example, you can have a headbutting dummy as a fake-out for the opponent to spot-dodge or crouch to avoid it, only to redirect the dummy back with a down tilt.
    If a Magic Missile from this move meets with a headbutting dummy-bot on the other hand, their encounter will cause both to explode in a Bowser Jr. sized explosion that deals 10% damage to opponents with vertical knockback that can KO at 150%, which can be considered better than the tiny buff with regular dummies even if the explosion happens at a bit of a weird angle.

    The Up Tilt can also be taken into consideration. If you go input Side Tilt, then magic up the dummy with an Up Tilt or just about any magic ball and then have the falling dummy hit the magic'd dummy, not only will both dummies be with a magic effect as they fall, but will also fall together at the same speed as a DSmash dummy while now dealing to opponents 4 hits of 3% preceding a final hit for 4% damage for a total of 16% damage that can KO foes at 135% and now deals an actually imposing spike that can launch farther. The Up Tilt's electric hitbox will even help connect a Down Tilt, as its freeze frames can give time to Dtilt. If a Magic Missile from this move encounters an explosion caused by the encounter of the dummies from the Side and Up Tilt, it will end up joining in on the explosion, increasing its range towards the direction the missile hit the explosion and now causing the explosion to deal 16% damage like the regular dummy's counterpart but also kill at 115%, wowza! While this is of course a very powerful result from a combinations of not-very-laggy moves, this is a result from a specific combination of different components found in different tilts, and the lack of any of these elements will not cause this combo to work, which considering that any of the elements found in the tilts can be destroyed by a single attack means that a smart enough opponent can hit one of the dummies or the projectile and break the combo, being as such easy to punish if spammed enough. A Mad Dummy player needs to as such find the right time and place to use this combo, maybe when you've already have enough dummies on the battlefield? Or maybe by tricking opponents to come by pausing an NSpec? The planning is up to you!

    Aerials. Aerials! AERIALS!
    Neutral Aerial: Mannequin Spin
    With the liberties of being in the air and having much more breathing space for their little angry dummy body, the Mad Dummy once again has one of their usual anger fits, though this time their middle segment stays completely still while the other two segments fly around. While still spinning and bobbing a bit, both the Mad Dummy's head and lower segment will circle in unison clockwise around the middle segment at around half a Kirby away from it, doing a full spin around it at the speed it takes for Lucas to twirl in his NAir before ending the move.

    Opponents hit by the Mad Dummy's spinning head and lower section will receive 9% damage with radial knockback when hit clean, but only 5% damage if hit late into the move, and while this move won't be KOing until late percentages, it has some pretty cool range that can be used for both scaring opponents (possibly into the line of fire) and also as a nice out-of-shield, though the move still does have however some not-so-chunky but still noticeable lag on both sides of the spectrum, which can cause problems with this move, another thing to note is that while this does have nice enough range, the dummy parts won't be disjointed since they are of course the dummy's vessel, so hitting them will still cancel the move and knock the Mad Dummy.

    One thing you may notice with this move is that while both segments will spin at equal speeds, the lower segment still has the plastic/steel/magic base below it, which will both increase the range for such segment a bit but also act as a sweetspot, dealing 11% clean and 6% late, having radial knockback that when fresh can KO at 180%. This sweetspot is especially good for spacing and poking, which due to the move's clockwise spin means that it may be beneficial to try and hit when coming in turned behind as if you were to use a BAir or even input the move so that later on the base can slam opponents in front of you once it passes by once the spin is close to stopping.

    Forward Aerial: Bottom Spin
    The Mad Dummy tilts their lower segment to point forward and in front of their middle section as they proceed to spin it in place at high speeds like a drill, twisting it quickly 3 times before tilting the section back to its right spot. This move doesn't have that much lag to start but has some chunky lag at its end, due to the Mad Dummy needing to stop the spinning and move back their segment, and also some bad ending lag.

    Opponents hit by the spinning segment of the Mad Dummy will receive up to six hits, two for every full spin, the first 5 hits dealing 1.5% simple hitstun damage while the final hit is the launcher, dealing 3% damage and knocking foes away horizontally and usually KOing them at 150%, though by connecting all this move's hits to deal around 10% damage you can decrease the expectancy to 40%.

    The spin is also fast enough to have a very small pushbox around it, which while barely noticeable can push foes towards the segment, additionally, while one may not notice it attracting foes, this pushbox around the drill can also push in a magic ball or magic missile (only one at a time for each input of the move) towards the segment. A magic ball that's gravitated towards the vessel part will spin around it in the same direction and speed as the spinning segment and will increase the damage opponents hit by the spin receive, the five hits now dealing 2% damage and the finisher dealing 4% damage, upping the move's total damage to now 14% damage and knockback that KOs at 140%, though also KOing at around 135% if all hits connect. The magic ball will then be released once the move ends, now going the direction it was going before being sucked in but from the direction the Mad Dummy is facing, so if it was going towards them, it will now be released while still rising or falling if it was angled.

    Magic Missiles will orbit around the vessel three times before being shot out at an opposite angle just like magic balls are supposed to, though their replication of it combined with their speed will cause it to have spun around 3 times by the time the vessel finishes its second spin, with its AI forcing it to already launch away from the vessel. This means that the Magic Missile can only be around for up to two spins or four possible hits, one of them possibly being the final launching hit. The Magic Missile's speed and the drilling vessel's speed come hand-in-hand and cause missile'd hits to deal 2.5% on hit while a missile'd launcher deals 6% damage. This means that if the Magic Missile is hit early in the move and ends its spin before the vessel's final spin and you're hitting an opponent the whole time, you'll still deal the same damage as a magic ball, but if the missile is sucked in later on and stays around for the final hit you can deal 17% damage and knock opponents away to KO them at 125% if all hits connect and the missile manages to do its 3 spins before the end of the move. Truly a powerful move with a lot of missiles around but also one that needs correct placement to work.

    Down Aerial: Dummy Stomp
    The Mad Dummy slinks their two lower segments towards their head, briefly connecting them to look like their crouch or Down Special before launching back down the segments, the middle segment only being thrown back to its original positioning below the head. The bottom section, on the other hand, will be thrown away downwards with the impulse of the launch, being shot away straight downwards at the speed of a falling Toon Link after a DAir, going down until 1 vertical platforms away from the Mad Dummy, though after reaching its limit the falling piece is then pushed back spinning by the Mad Dummy towards the rest of their body, at double the speed it came at and causing the Mad Dummy to bounce around a small bit once the segment snaps back to it like a rubber band.

    Since the Mad Dummy doesn't just stop being connected to its vessel part and even in a maddened state is above wasting a vessel, when the dummy part is being dropped down it's still being inhabited partly by the Mad Dummy and as such if an opponent hits it, it will end up also knocking the Mad Dummy! Knockback and damage of moves who hit the vessel piece will be half as much to the Mad Dummy and will cause the Mad Dummy to be knocked away way up where the rest of their body and the majority of their invisible ghost body is, with the fallen vessel aiming back at the rest of the Mad Dummy the moment they receive knockback, which considering our angry dummy isn't awfully away from the dummy piece doesn't mean that it will take too long for the piece to come back.

    Opponents hit early in the move by the Mad Dummy's stomping vessel will receive 12% damage, though if hit too late into the move will only receive 8%, with meteor smashing knockback that while not the kind that will launch much has the boon of having the longest range out of the Mad Dummy's aerials, being able to hit grounded opponents from a reasonable distance into the air, though it's not recommended to nor spam nor short-hop this move, as this move has some pretty unbearable lag when landing and finishing the attack. If an opponent is hit by the dummy segment while its being retrieved, they will receive half as usual damage from it and some pretty weak radial knockback that won't be killing any time soon.

    If a Magic Ball is passed right through the stomping segment, it will affect the stomp by giving the lower part of the vessel piece a magic effect similar to the one possible to be given to an FTilt dummy, which will increase the damage given by this move to 14% early and 10% late, with a strong spike that can send opponents careening down a very good distance at later percentages, potentially making this your kill stomp if you can manage to have magic balls around offstage. If a Magic Missile is passed by the dummy piece, it will explode as common in this set, extinguishing in a bumper-sized explosion that deals 16% damage on hit and with vertical knockback that can KO at 130%, of course on the spot and something that you'll need to plan to space the opponent to be hit by.

    If the dummy's falling piece hits the ground, it will stop and hit the ground before a few frames later being reeled back towards the Mad Dummy. During such time, if you input the attack button again, the Mad Dummy itself will be reeled towards the segment, etching towards it at the same speed the fallen part takes when being boomerang'd back before connecting to the piece with a bit of a shake, and while this may continue to itch some readers for a short-hop, this in itself has a bit of lag in it. Reeling the Mad Dummy into the ground in itself has some uses though, as it can be good for escaping opponents and getting out of the air in a snap.

    Back Aerial: Middle Launch
    The Mad Dummy tilts their head to look a bit behind alongside their bottom section as they harmlessly spring forward their middle dummy part before slingshotting it back behind them, shooting it away at a medium-fast speed so it's entirely away from the rest of the Mad Dummy's hitbox and even a bit beyond, reaching such distance before shortly after rocketing back to sandwich itself back between its other segments. While a bit laggy to start with, this move has some nice enough range behind the Mad Dummy and is more reliable to hit than a FAir or a NAir, dealing 10% damage to opponents who are hit by the segment with horizontal knockback that can KO at 150%, spacing opponents away, edgeguarding and even being able to dodge attacks by moving back the middle of your hurtbox!

    If a magic ball or missile gets in the way of the dummy part when it's slinged back, it will push the projectile along with them until the move's apex, spinning the vessel around as a manner to not be damaged by the magic bullet as the Mad Dummy proceeds to once again launch it's middle section, now forward again with impulse from the bullet, going forward 2 SBBs and also lagging behind it the rest of the Mad Dummy, which after the distance is reached successfully manage to keep up with the middle segment and return to sweet idle, though of course now at the new spot, which while a good alternative recovery is also hard to pull off at times and can only be used once per air time, with all further interactions just launching forward the midsection which then bounces back to the rest of the body, still in the same general area as before executing the move.

    The launched Mad Dummy will temporarily act as a PK Thunder 2-like hitbox if bounced off a magic ball, dealing up to 6 hits of 2% damage before knocking the opponent away horizontally with a KO potential at around 135%, while if bounced off a magic missile only dealing two hits of 6%, which either way results in the same total damage as the magic ball-kind: 12%. This is pretty good for scaring opponents away with this move or to use in conjuction with the magic balls being pointed towards an offstage opponent that can happen to also go in your direction if you're in front of the adversary.

    Up Aerial: Head Shot
    The Mad Dummy tilts their head forward, their snout-like face almost tipping close to the middle section and the rounder part of their head taking facing upwards as they then inch their head a bit closer to their body before launching it upwards, causing it to go up a fairly ranged distance, yet still not going as much as the BAir and certainly not reaching DAir lengths of range. After reaching into the air, the Mad Dummy's ghost will then proceed to push back their head in a snap, wasting no time in getting their head back on its spot, thus making this move not so laggy when ending, with its startup also being better than the likes of the FAir or DAir, making this one of the Mad Dummy's quicker and safer options, probably close to the NAir in that aspect.

    Opponents hit by the Mad Dummy's headbutt will receive 10% damage with light vertical knockback, the kind that won't KO until the reaches of more than 200% but also the kind perfect for juggling, with this move easily chaining into itself a couple times at early to mid percentages. When the Up Tilt's not being used for dummy combos it's probably going to be used as a precursor to this move, as of course both move's low vertical knockback come hand-and-hand, with a correctly placed magic spark knocking opponents upwards for the dummy juggle.

    Additionally, the Mad Dummy can juggle more than foes, as if their moving head hits a magic bullet, the ball or the missile will shortly pause their forward movement as they are pushed 1 SBB away into the air, resuming what they were doing and where they were going after being bumped, potentially pushing the Magic Ball 2 SBBs with correctly timed jumps. This is good for making magic balls go higher in the air to attack more aerial-heavy opponents or even try to try and influence the magic balls if you're playing one of THOSE stages, while magic missiles can be shot upwards to mix up their localization away or closer to the opponent to correspond to your current tactics.

    Throws. Throws! THROWS
    For their grab, the Mad Dummy leans forward their segments a bit, the head the farthest and the last segment the least, sometimes shouting "Grab, Dummies!" as from the ground in front of them two dummy(-bots) appear out of the ground side-by-side, who'll despite not having hands or the like will either way grab opponents, holding them above their heads and squeezing them towards each other for a rather slow grab the speed of something like Pac-Man's grab.
    To make matters worse, the dummies themselves are pretty weak and aren't the best at their grip with the opponent (try holding someone with your head, I've tried it, it's hard), so much so that this grab only has .8x the usual difficulty to escape, yikes!

    However, like we've all discovered the last couple input sections is that the more dummies the merrier! If there are any dummies on the battlefield after the Mad Dummy has successfully grabbed an opponent, the moment they do so all the field dummies will quickly sink into the ground and reappear below the grabbed opponent, growing the size of the mob of grabbing dummies! While this does mean that you can't have projectiles be shot at the opponent while they are grabbed, also means that the mad Dummy's grab release difficulty is increased! For every dummy that joins in, the escape difficulty will increase by .1x, so it'll take two dummies being on the field for the Mad Dummy's grab to be on par with other fighters. This of course will also mean that with more dummies this grab gets more and more difficult to escape, with a grab after 5 dummies were placed and with a 7 dummy mob having 1.3x the expected difficulty to escape, meaning that while at earlier percentages where you haven't placed that many dummies or any at all your grab game may not be the best, at late-game where you're expected to have 5 dummies around and the opponent takes longer to escape grabs due to their higher damage, the Mad Dummy's grab can be pretty terrifying, and something the opponent will want to avoid.

    Pummel: Dummy Beat Up
    The dummies widen their circle around the foe, causing the adversary to fall to the ground inside the circle, at which point all the dummies proceed to tilt their head to face completely forward as they all headbutt the opponent in unison, damaging them and also knocking them back to between their heads. Like the Mad Dummy's slow grab, their pummel is equally is terribly slow, with it needing to do the whole fall and headbutt animation, which while not Ganon tier slow, considering the Mad Dummy's easier to escape grab at vanilla, you can only pummel once before releasing the opponent or throwing them.

    However, even at point blank, the power of a fluffy cotton head ramming you isn't very powerful, and with only the two dummies you'll only be dealing a single percent of damage. This means that with no dummies to help you your pummel is pretty useless, being slow and risking the foe's escape for the reward of 1% damage, on the other hand, each additional dummy in this move will deal 1% more damage, so with 3 dummies around you'll be dealing what's average for a grab of the input's speed, while with all 5 additional dummies you'll be dealing 6% damage on pummel, which is quite a lot for such a meek move, but such is the real superpower of teamwork. Considering at that point you've got an actual good grab at your hands, at later percentages you can risk not throwing at all to try to pummel twice, which will deal quite a lot, 12% damage, which might just be the kind of additional damage you're needing.

    Forward Throw: Magic Mass
    The dummies holding the foe all bundle up closer to each other as they all headbutt the opponent away from them, throwing them away the fixed distance of 1 platform away from the Mad Dummy and also the height of said dummy off the ground, dealing 4-8% damage (like when referring to the damage in Smashes, in this section we'll be referring damage as X-Y%, the former number being the damage with no additional dummies while the latter is the total damage with five additional dummies).

    After throwing the foe, each and all of the dummies proceed to do what they do best and in unison will shoot towards the opponent their at this point trademark magic ball, and in the case of the dummy-bots will of course all transform into magic missiles to hit the foe. With five dummies around so many magic balls will be produced that they'll practically be forming a cloud of magic, with dummy-bots creating an equally terrifying visage to the opponent in the form of the flurry of missiles coming their way. Both kinds of magic will either way deal 2-7%, which while having small horizontal knockback with just the two dummies, which in itself isn't that bad considering they've already spaced the opponent away, but things can quickly pick up with more and more dummies, with a seven dummy total barrage knocking foes away horizontally for the KO at around 120%, though with one additional dummy you can already KO at 210%. This throw is one of the Mad Dummy's strongest if with enough dummies, and while needing to pick up steam from dummies to work and most likely only being used late-game as a result, it can get pretty devastating and can definitely be something the foe will be fearing if you're well prepared enough.

    Down Throw: Mad Trample
    The Mad Dummy yells at the dummies holding the opponent to back off and give them some space, with of course variations on what they say like with other yelling moves. The dummies do as commanded and will move away from the Mad Dummy, though not taking the foe along with them and leaving them on the ground. After back away, the enfuriated dummy will start to banter on the dummy's capabilities when it comes to grabbing, and while them arguing about just the two dummies' incompetence is acceptable, even with seven dummies the Mad Dummy will still nitpick about a varied topic that's wrong with the grab, at times arguing about the way the dummies hold the foe or straight up just flaming on the poor dummies without much explanation, wow, cruel.

    The thing is though, is that the Mad Dummy will also inch forward while ranting, trampling over the prone foe in the process! While normally they'd just float over them, for this move the Mad Dummy is especially angry at its minions that they add a bit more of a -kick- to this move, bobbing their lower segment to the ground and also the adversary, dealing 5 hits of 2% before finishing their rant as the dummies flee back into the stage and into their place if once in the stage as the foe is knocked away vertically and KO'ed at140%, making this overall a bit of an average throw, but also one with the boon of having the Mad Dummy itself execute the move, not needing a ton of dummies to be good, which means that this is the go-to-move if you managed to grab with only two dummies or are still unsure about using the big guns due to not having that much dummies.

    Back Throw: Take 'em away, Boys!
    The Mad Dummy scoffingly tilts their head behind them, actually being able to turn their head completely due to, you know, not having a neck as the dummies, understanding their boss's command and probably happy that they didn't decide to do the previous input as they soon after start rather cutely shuffling on the ground towards the direction the Mad Dummy pointed at, taking of course the opponent with them. After going a certain distance with the opponent, one of the dummies surrounding them will trip under their weight as the other dummies, alerted by one of their comrades falling, proceed to together headbutt the opponent away, which while of course very weak with only one dummy headbutting, dealing only 3% damage, with 6 dummies the combined headbutt can be enough to deal 15% damage, with 2% being added for every additional dummy! Knockback-wise, it's horizontal but won't be killing until very late percentages with no additional dummies, but with one more dummy it can KO at 200% and with six dummies can KO at 130%, the initial movement before the move can also help with KOing, as if you plan on KO Throwing someone but are still too far from the ledge, the dummies might just reach there for you!

    The distance traveled depends on the number of dummies around, with only the two original dummies doing the heavy work and carrying the foe, they'll only go .5 SBBs behind the Mad Dummy, while three dummies will go 1 SBB and seven will go a whole platform away before throwing! Don't be expecting dummies to fall of ledges though, I mean, they're still smart enough to not fall off them, even if they're dummies.

    Up Throw: Straight Outta the Ground
    The dummies widen their circle around the opponent, causing them to fall to the ground in the process as the dummies proceed to one by one and one after the other sink right into the ground like what they do to transport themselves to the grab, completely going underground. After all of the dummies have gone underground, which won't take long to do, the dummies will one by one at a quick speed headbutt out of the ground while rising out of it upwards, not going off the ground like the FTilt but popping up right below the foe, dealing 2% damage per dummy, totaling up to the foe receiving 14% damage by being headbutted by 7 dummies, and while almost all of the headbutts only deal hitstun, the final dummy will always be the one to deal upwards knockback, which while naturally not the best in the Mad Dummy's throw game, only KOing at 180-145%, the damage before the final hit causes it to KO earlier, and while minuscule for 2 dummies, can decrease the KO expectancy to at around 131%. When used with not a lot of dummies, this move can find a use in being an easy way to start an UAir juggle even at percentages that are a bit later, though with too many dummies this move can lose its knockback touch and knock too hard, though considering in a flat stage this move will consistently KO no matter where in the stage, with many dummies this move can still have its usages.

    Final Smash
    Who Needs Friends? I've got Knives!
    [​IMG]
    The Mad Dummy now has the mighty Smash Ball in their non-existent hands, with such grand power the angry dummy can finally do that revenge thing for whats-his-face! The powered dummy proceeds to yell out a loud "DUMMIES!" as in response a group of ten dummies pops out of the ground in front of the Mad Dummy at quick speeds, covering a range of about 2 SBBs away from the dummy. The Mad Dummy then yells out "Oh, I've had enough with you incompetent fools! You're all Fired. Fired! FIRED!" as the upset dummies (including the Side Special ones) then proceed to slowly sink to the ground with a bit of sadness.

    What? That's lame! He just fires his minions like what he can do with a Special? Boo! Lame! However, after the dummies are fired, the Mad Dummy doesn't hire new ones, but instead starts having a rather panicking dialogue about "Who cares. Who cares! WHO CARES!" as they then say that they don't need friends, as they've got knives!
    [​IMG]
    At this point you'll then notice, those dummies weren't just for show, they were to catch foes, like MK or Greninja's Final Smash! If the opponent is caught by the dummies, they'll get in a prone-like state throughout the rest of the move and won't be able to dodge the Mad Dummy's next action. After stating that they have knives, the Mad Dummy proceeds to grab out of hammerspace a rather comically large throwing knife that's almost as wide as the dummy is tall, which they then proceed to somehow, despite the lack of arms, throw forward at high speeds, Shiek's Needles high speeds. This knife will go forward with very slight gravity, though the knife will be around until it goes offscreen, so unless you're using this at the other side of the stage you won't notice this much. This terrifying knife will pass through opponents and deal 40% on hit to any opponents on the field with knockback that will KO at 100%, with any subsequent opponents being hit with 10% less than the last, while if an opponent is made prone by the dummies, it will damage them at point blank for 50% damage which can KO at around 70%, for a scary ranged attack.
    After throwing the first knife, the Mad Dummy proceeds to look as if scuffling around behind them trying to get the second knife, but... ...he's out of knives.
    [​IMG]
    Despite this single knife potentially killing off many opponents with a single toss and being a pretty respectable Final Smash, the Mad Dummy will still get embarrassed over how humiliated he was for having only one knife, causing them to awkwardly exclame that they're out of knives as they then loudly yell for their dummies to come back, which while not being shown, do come back as the final smash is finished and the Mad Dummy is back to their hectic bullet-hell zone.
     
    #6 Reigaheres, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2016
  7. Dr. Slavic

    Dr. Slavic
    Expand Collapse
    Smash Cadet

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    Taco Bell probably
    SLAVIC'S COMPARATIVE AND RELATIVE RANKING SYSTEM!

    Make Your Move 18 Hype! I will be returning to my old triple pronged rating system, with the same witty images and criteria!

    Details are listed below. Part of it is for fun, part is to motivate me to read more, and part is for preparing for the end contest voting. I’ve decided to give subrankings of each set based on three different criteria, ranked between 0 and 5, with an overall ranking averaged between them. This gives more meaning to each ranking and can help show movesetters their strong and weak points on a set rather than just say they are subjectively good or bad. The different criteria are described below.

    Writing Style
    This category determines the raw writing of the set. Sentence structure, flow, grammar, and spelling are all part of this, as well as the formatting of the set (colors, fonts, pictures). 0 is a set fraught with misspelled words, missing punctuation, and no capitalization, while 5 is a set not only pleasant to look at but fun to read.

    Creativity
    This category looks at the portrayal of the character’s abilities in the moveset. Gimmicks are judged here as well as the uniqueness of a set. 0 would be a set below Sakurai levels with no inspiration and/or missing inputs or information, while 5 is an interesting, totally new idea that has been fully fleshed out.

    Gameplay
    This category examines how well the moves work and are explained. Damage, knockback, move integration, and especially playstyle determine the ranking here. 0 is a set which fails to create any sort of playstyle or uses completely broken or useless inputs, while a 5 is given to sets with a clear understanding of its gameplay and creates playstyles unique to that character.

    *Note, the lowest possible score is 0 and the highest possible score is 5. 2.5 is considered an average score.

    Allen O'Neil
    Smash Daddy
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 4
    Creativity - 5
    Gameplay - 5
    Overall - 4.67

    Kristoph

    Smash Daddy
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 4.5
    Creativity - 4.5
    Gameplay - 4.5

    Overall - 4.50

    Artorias

    FrozenRoy
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 4.5
    Creativity - 4.5
    Gameplay - 4.5
    Overall - 4.50

    Lickitung

    Smash Daddy
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 4
    Creativity - 4
    Gameplay - 4.5

    Overall - 4.17

    Malomyotismon

    ForwardArrow
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 4.5
    Creativity - 4

    Gameplay - 4
    Overall - 4.17

    Anti-Mage

    FrozenRoy
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 4.5
    Gameplay - 4

    Overall - 4.00

    Gaige

    JOE!
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 4
    Creativity - 4
    Gameplay - 4
    Overall - 4.00

    Diancie

    JamietheAuraUser
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 3
    Creativity - 4.5
    Gameplay - 4.5
    Overall - 4.00

    Zyra
    FrozenRoy
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 4
    Gameplay - 4.5

    Overall - 4.00

    Atlantis

    MasterWarlord

    [​IMG]
    Writing - 4
    Creativity - 4
    Gameplay - 3.5
    Overall - 3.83

    Chesnaught

    JOE!
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 3.5
    Gameplay - 4.5

    Overall - 3.83

    Zer0

    JOE!
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 4
    Creativity - 4.5
    Gameplay - 3
    Overall - 3.83

    The Butcher
    FrozenRoy
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 3.5
    Gameplay - 4

    Overall - 3.67

    Marina Cannonvale

    Katapultar
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3.5

    Creativity - 4.5
    Gameplay - 3.5
    Overall - 3.67

    Doppelganger Tsukika

    Katapultar
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 4

    Gameplay - 3
    Overall - 3.50

    Link 2.0
    Munomario777
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3

    Creativity - 4
    Gameplay - 3.5
    Overall - 3.50

    Mad Dummy

    Reigaheres
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 3
    Gameplay - 3.5

    Overall - 3.33

    Ekko

    FrozenRoy
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 4
    Creativity - 4
    Gameplay - 2

    Overall - 3.33

    Doppelganger Welsh

    Katapultar
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 3
    Gameplay - 3.5

    Overall - 3.33

    Paper Mario
    Munomario777
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 4
    Creativity - 3
    Gameplay - 3

    Overall - 3.33

    Joe DiMaggio

    FrozenRoy
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 3
    Gameplay - 3.5

    Overall - 3.33

    Doppelganger Shirogane

    Katapultar
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3.5

    Creativity - 3
    Gameplay - 3
    Overall - 3.17

    Piplup
    Munomario777
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3
    Creativity - 3
    Gameplay - 3

    Overall - 3.00

    Anub'Arak

    Kholdstare
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 4

    Creativity - 3
    Gameplay - 2
    Overall - 3.00

    Gluth

    FrozenRoy
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3

    Creativity - 3
    Gameplay - 2.5
    Overall - 2.83

    ExciteBiker

    Munomario777
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3
    Creativity - 2.5
    Gameplay - 3

    Overall - 2.83

    Captain Toad

    Munomario777
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 3
    Gameplay - 2
    Overall - 2.83

    Etsy Dee

    Katapultar
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 4

    Creativity - 2
    Gameplay - 2.5
    Overall - 2.83

    Electivire
    FrozenRoy
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 3
    Gameplay - 2
    Overall - 2.83

    Togekiss

    Reigaheres
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 3
    Creativity - 2
    Gameplay - 3

    Overall - 2.67

    Sproink

    Bionichute
    [​IMG]
    Writing - 2
    Creativity - 3
    Gameplay - 3

    Overall - 2.67

    Roy
    FrozenRoy
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 2
    Gameplay - 2.5
    Overall - 2.67

    Honchkrow

    BridgesWithTurtles
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 4
    Creativity - 2

    Gameplay - 1.5
    Overall - 2.50

    Elka

    Katapultar
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 4
    Creativity - 2
    Gameplay - 1
    Overall - 2.50

    Soul Skyheart

    Katapultar
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 2
    Gameplay - 2
    Overall - 2.50

    The Appetizer

    Rychu
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 3
    Creativity - 1
    Gameplay - 1

    Overall - 1.67

    Pseudo Vorgis

    Katapultar
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 3.5
    Creativity - 1.5
    Gameplay - .5
    Overall - 1.67

    Isabelle

    Veggi
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 1.5
    Creativity - 1.5

    Gameplay - 1
    Overall - 1.33

    Toa Pohatu

    IvanQuote
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 2
    Creativity - 1
    Gameplay - .5

    Overall - 1.17

    Nico Robin

    Kirby Dragons
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 1.5
    Creativity - .5
    Gameplay - .5
    Overall - 0.83










    Geno

    PK-ow!
    [​IMG]

    Writing - 1
    Creativity - .5

    Gameplay - .5
    Overall - 0.67
     
    #7 Dr. Slavic, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2016
    JOE!, Munomario777 and FrozenRoy like this.
  8. Munomario777

    Munomario777
    Expand Collapse
    Smash Champion

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    2,832
    Location:
    Charleston, South Carolina
    3DS FC:
    0387-9596-4480
    NNID:
    Munomario777
    [​IMG]

    "Piplup, the Penguin Pokémon. Piplup's limited walking skills often cause it to fall down, but that never hurts its pride. It doesn't like to be taken care of. It's difficult to bond with since it won't listen to its Trainer.
    Because it is very proud, it hates accepting food from people. Its thick down guards it from cold."

    Piplup, the Penguin Pokémon! This little guy debuted in Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, as one of the trio of starters. It eventually evolves into Empoleon, its more powerful but less cute final form. Regardless, let's see what this little guy can do even without an evolution! Never stopped Squirtle after all. As always, this set is made for Smash on the Wii U. Anyway, let's get right into this moveset!

    STATS

    Piplup is a very small fighter -- about Pikachu's height. It's not quite as quick though, with a dash speed similar to that of the Wii Fit Trainer's. Its air speed is decent, and it can jump fairly high and fall quickly enough. It has a pretty high traction stat due to its small size (less weight = less inertia), and it can also dodge attacks rather easily, but of course, it's not very difficult to KO Piplup -- it shares its weight stat with, you guessed it, Pikachu. Piplup, however, has a decent wall jump, and can crawl by sliding on its belly, moving forwards with its flippers.

    Being a water-type Pokémon, many of Piplup's attacks create water to attack with. If a water-type hitbox hits the ground or the top of a platform, it'll form a puddle on the ground about 1 SBB wide. (Ideally all water attacks from any fighter would do this, but I'm not here to make another Smash game, now am I?) This water has some pretty good effects for Piplup. Firstly, it'll power up some attacks in ways that vary from attack to attack, which will be explained later.

    As for affecting foes, wet ground will cause them to slip about 1.5x as much when they attempt to turn around or stop from a dash. It's not quite as severe as ice physics, but it can mess with your opponent for sure. However, a foe can use this reduced traction to their advantage -- perfect pivots, pivot grabs and attacks, pseudo-wavedashes, and slide smashes are all increased in distance. Piplup will undergo these same effects (and can thus extend its distance with the aforementioned techniques), except its sliding animation when turning around or stopping isn't increased. In the latter case, though, it'll still slide along the ground a bit in its idle animation, so it's possible to attack whilst moving for a short period of time after dashing -- use this to your advantage!

    Water, of course, won't last forever -- it'll evaporate after five seconds or so. In addition, it'll react to hitboxes close to it. The heat generated by the air friction of attacks causes it to evaporate more quickly, at a rate of one second of duration lost per 10% of damage. (It won't interrupt projectiles or cause freeze frames or anything.) Piplup's attacks, being a Water-type, won't have this effect. It's even easier to gain access to water on stages like Delfino, by the way, since the natural water there counts as water for Piplup or other fighters to use. Finally, if Piplup is against another Piplup (or another water-focused fighter), they'll both "share" the puddles, since they affect both the user and the opponent in pretty much the same way. Piplup, Greninja, and other water-based fighters are unique in that they aren't hindered by sliding when ending a dash.


    SPECIALS

    Neutral Special - Aqua Tail
    "The user attacks by swinging its tail as if it were a vicious wave in a raging storm."

    Piplup performs a backflip, and when its tail hits the ground (very early on in the flip), it creates a wave-like water projectile -- its appearance is the same as in the games. Its travel speed is similar to that of Cloud's Blade Beam, but this isn't as tall, and will fall due to gravity without ground below it. Upon hitting a foe, it won't cause flinching, instead acting as a windbox that stretches a bit above the projectile itself. It can effectively push foes off the ledge or away from Piplup, and also deals 1% of damage every half a second or so (but again, without flinching). If the Aqua Tail projectile is falling, the windbox will be aimed diagonally downwards too. Of course, the projectile will also leave a water trail wherever it goes, but will go away after traveling only 5 SBB normally. If there's already water on the ground, the distance cap will "pause" as long as it travels over water, extending the move's range. This is an effective way to keep foes away and get the ground wet, but has considerable lag.

    Ice Version - Ice Shard
    "The user flash freezes chunks of ice and hurls them at the target."

    Eh? Ice version? Wazzat all about?

    If you double-tap B when using a special, you'll instead use an Ice-type version of that move! Piplup is a penguin after all. These change some other properties of these attacks, but first I should go over freezing water. Essentially, when you use an Ice-type move, your water will be frozen over, turned into ice, if the attack touches it. This pretty much puts another timer "on top of" the old one. So if your water had three seconds left, and you froze it, then it'd thaw out after five seconds, then evaporate after another three. Ice can also be thawed more quickly by using attacks. It has the same traction stuff as water, but may affect attacks differently depending on the move.

    Anyway, now that that info dump is over with, let's get into this actual move. It's basically unchanged, except the water will be frozen obviously, making it an ice chunk instead of a little wave of water. It'll freeze water it comes across, and deals a single hit of 5% and moderate upward-forward knockback. It's got different uses, now useful as a normal projectile instead of a gimping / messing-with-the-foe tool, despite these simple changes. (It also has utility for freezing water of course, which will become more relevant later on.)


    Side Special - Surf
    "The user attacks everything around it by swamping its surroundings with a giant wave. This can also be used for crossing water."

    Piplup begins sliding along the ground on its belly, like a penguin. Its speed and range are similar to that of Cloud's down tilt, and it'll deal 5% while knocking the foe upwards and forwards at about a 45-degree angle. It doesn't have very much lag on either end, and can be jump-canceled on hit to follow up on the attack. It's a pretty good comboing move, and gives Piplup a horizontal boost (and reduced falling speed) in midair, which is good for recovering, but can only be used once before landing. But all this doesn't have much to do with Surf, now does it? Right -- that's where puddles come in!

    If used over water, Piplup essentially mimics its appearance in Brawl as a support Pokémon animation-wise, forming a small wave of water that deals an increased 7% on hit, but the same combo-friendly knockback. Not only can this version be performed for as long as there's water or ice to travel across (unlike the normal version's very limited range), but it can also be jump-canceled at any time -- the normal version, by contrast, can only do so if you hit an opponent -- and travels at Little Mac's dash speed! It's a very good and safe approach option, especially since the water acts as a disjointed hitbox. You can simply let go of the button to cut it short, by the way, and if you reach the end of the wet ground, then it pretty much turns into the normal version. So yeah, this is a pretty great tool for Piplup to have, and a good reward for having wet ground! It'll run out eventually though, so keeping it maintained is a good thing indeed.

    Ice Version - Frozen Surf
    Piplup freezes the little wave of water, having more startup lag, and kicks off to slide at a slightly higher speed. You can now travel even if there isn't water, and you'll freeze it too. Instead of dealing combo knockback, you'll deal an impressive 14% and knockback that KOs at around 120%. This has such force that it shatters the ice completely and sends Piplup into a bit of backwards recoil. (Not self-damage, just getting knocked back from the impact.) It has more startup, however, and more endlag too if you miss.

    Up Special - Aqua Jet
    "The user lunges at the target at a speed that makes it almost invisible."

    Piplup's recovery move is pretty similar to Greninja's, I'll just say it now. It creates a stream of water that propels it in any of the eight directions, and can screw with recoveries by virtue of being a windbox. However, there are some differences -- both internal and external -- that make it more than just a recovery move! Firstly, unlike Hydro Pump, this can only be aimed in one direction; Piplup cannot change directions mid-travel. This is due to the move's increased speed, which is a plus. Thanks to both this speed buff and the 5%, moderate upwards-forwards knockback hitbox on Piplup's beak, it's harder to intercept when recovering (although there is a bit of start-up lag). Upon landing, there's minimal lag -- only 1/6 of a second (the same as Mario's nair). Of course, the water stream can wet the ground. Piplup's pose, by the way, is similar to Surf, and of course, this move will leave Piplup in special fall.

    Now then, for the part that actually makes this move unique. Y'know how puddles reduce traction? And how they boost pseudo-wavedashes? And how 1/6 of a second is the same landing lag as a Melee wavedash? Yeah, Piplup has a pseudo-wavedash. By aiming Aqua Jet diagonally downwards, Piplup can slide a short distance along the ground, mimicking a wavedash from Melee, with similar options. Normally, though, it doesn't have a lot of distance to it thanks to Piplup's high traction stat. But if the ground is wet, the slipperiness increases this pseudo-wavedash's distance and utility greatly, sliding about a platform's distance. It's an excellent tool for comboing and for approaching, obviously. This and Surf are pretty big incentives to have water on the ground -- one could even Surf into a foe, jump cancel it into an aerial, hit the foe towards the ground, and use Aqua Jet to wavedash over with either more comboing, or a KO move! As long as there's water, of course.

    By the way, "wave" dashing on wet ground creates a little wave of water as a visual effect. Funny how things work out like that, eh?

    Ice Version - Ice Wall
    Piplup does pretty much the same thing, but shortly after the water is created, it's frozen solid although it thaws out after three seconds or so (you also cannot use the ice version of the move again until you land on actual ground). If it's diagonal or horizontal, it acts as a big drop-through platform, nice for some setups as you can imagine. If it's vertical... well, then it gets interesting. It becomes a big, tall wall that can be wall-jumped, teched, knockback-bounced, you-name-it off of – it's a wall. At the end of the move you'll be standing on top of it like the stick in Garden of Hope, not in helpless, so you can get down to the ground quickly and make use of it. This can save you from potential KOs, create combos, and help with mobility thanks to the wall-jump.

    Down Special - Rain Dance
    "The user summons a heavy rain that falls for five turns, powering up Water-type moves."

    Piplup strikes a "ta-da!" pose with its flippers stretched upward, causing a platform-sized rain cloud to appear directly above it, about 2 SBB up (in midair, it's created right below Piplup). Then, guess what, it starts raining! Only under that cloud, though. The rain drops come down pretty fast, and they can go down an unlimited distance until hitting a platform. Once they do, they'll make the ground wet, replenishing the puddle it as long as it rains. It'll only last, however, six seconds before disappearing (indicated by the cloud going from a deep grey to white in terms of color). The long duration is helpful, but can also hinder Piplup, as only one can be in play at a time -- so choose your placement wisely. The rain will also add a downwards force to fighters, causing them to descend faster; the increase is equal to Jiggs' falling speed. This also affects jump height and other stuff. This includes Piplup: depending on the cloud's placement, this downwards force can either help extend combos and make SHFFing more effective, or be a pain in the rear end when recovering. Only Piplup, though, will be able to power up its attacks with the puddles created by the rain (I guess Greninja and Squirtle would be able to as well if this mechanic and squirtle were actually in the game), and is able to do so repeatedly without using up the puddle like it normally does since the rain is constantly replenishing the puddle.

    One more thing: the cloud acts as a platform! Specifically, a supersoft platform. It's like the clouds on Skyworld -- they act like normal platforms, except fighters can be spiked through them. So it won't interrupt KOs or anything, but can be used for general platform purposes like comboing too. The cloud platform has the benefit of always being "wet" -- clouds are made of water, after all. So Piplup's attacks are always the version used inside a puddle. It's also a rather safe platform compared to others -- the downwards force from the rain discourages fighters from coming up to hit you, and also makes your landing faster if you drop through. But of course, this can be used by either Piplup, or by opponents. If you make a platform in midair, it can aid in recovery immensely (you'll even get your midair jump back, but you can't use it after Aqua Jet because of the helpless state after that move), but then you'll be deprived of the ability to use this move onstage.

    Ice Version - Hail
    "The user summons a hail storm lasting five turns."

    The cloud instead creates hail, which not only freezes water, but also deals flinching damage to foes, 2% and flinching upon entry into the AoE and every half-second after that they remain inside. It's possible to roll through or simply tank the hits, but this can prove to be a nice camping move especially since it eliminates some projectiles (it acts as a projectile itself). However, it obviously doesn't create water, nor does it buff Piplup's attacks when it's underneath aside from ice effects. You can also have only one cloud out at a time, so you can't have a rain and a hail cloud out at once. Mirroring the Rain Dance cloud, you'll always get an ice effect when standing on top of a Hail cloud.

    STANDARDS

    Jab - Peck
    "The target is jabbed with a sharply pointed beak."

    Piplup's jab is pretty basic -- it's in the style of Pikachu's. Press the button, and in the blink of an eye, Piplup pecks its beak in front of it while leaning forward a great deal. Hold it down, and it keeps doing this rapid-fire. It deals 1 or 2% and flinching each time it hits, and is really fast. You can use it for jab locks with ease, and Piplup's beak gives it a bit more (disjointed) reach. Try water-sliding in with this move for an approach! Who knows, you might be able to follow up with another attack. (You can also do this to rush in with a jab lock!) Speaking of jab locks, Piplup can use one of Pikachu's jab lock techniques -- jab 'em off a platform, fall down, keep jabbing, and hit 'em with a strong attack! Piplup can create its own platforms with Rain Dance and the ice uspec, so this works out nicely.

    Forward Tilt - Pound
    "The target is physically pounded with a long tail."

    Piplup spins around on its right foot with the left one held backwards, spinning in a circle rather quickly. The tail is the hitbox, and becomes a bit bigger for this attack -- a common occurrence in Smash. This fairly quick hitbox deals 8% of damage and knocks the foe forwards a bit, at about a 30* upwards angle. At low percents, foes will have to tech, they can't jump or anything before hitting the ground -- if they miss their tech, you can tech chase, or use Peck to jab lock! Another quirk to this attack, is that if you're standing on wet or icy ground, you can move around at walk speed during this attack! You'll slide around like you're figure skating or something. This is very useful, since you can use a moving ftilt, hit the foe, and then tech chase, jab lock, or follow up with ease! (You'll already be right next to them, since you were moving forward.) Of course, at high percents this may not be enough to get up close, but hey, it's a start.


    Up Tilt - Pip-hop
    Piplup crouches down a tiny bit (for some rather short start lag), and then hops up into the air, its feet coming about one Piplup head above the ground and its head aimed slightly upwards. Piplup's head will act as a hitbox during the ascent, dealing 9% of damage and moderate upwards knockback. It's a good anti-air move, and since it ends rather quickly, Piplup may be able to land a follow-up attack at low percents. There's also a hitbox right as Piplup lands that deals a meteor smash and the same 9%. Grounded foes, this being a meteor smash, will get sent up a short distance, but with extra hitstun. So if you slide across a puddle and use this move, you can stomp on a foe and start a combo, or follow up with a powerful attack! And if you do it underneath a rain cloud, they won't go up as much; ergo, they'll be in range for a greater variety of attacks. Of course, the spike hitbox is also great for a surprise KO near the ledge, or on top of a Rain Dance cloud (your foe must be airborne; they'll get spiked right through the supersoft platform). Alternatively, puddle-slide towards a ledge and then use this move to stomp right off of the ledge! The move animation will end quickly, so after meteor smashing the foe, you can still recover.

    Down Tilt - Pip-stomp
    Piplup is a pretty proud Pokémon (holy alliterations batman!), and it shows in this move. It puts its hands / flippers / whatever on its hips and holds up its right foot before slamming it down onto the ground. The foot will deal 7% of damage, and while grounded foes take a bit of forwards knockback, midair foes are sent straight down! It's a powerful spike and a decent tilt with low cooldown, but it takes some time to start (since Piplup loves being a show-off apparently, but it's still pretty adorable). If you use it in water, though, this startup is worth it -- the stomp causes a wave to form and travel through the wet ground! It travels at Meta Knight's dash speed, knocking any foes it hits up into the air while also dealing 3% of damage. It's a great tool to get your foe up into the air, ripe for a follow-up! It can go as far as you want as long as there's water, and can even go through multiple opponents.

    Dash Attack - Drill Peck
    "A corkscrewing attack with a sharp beak acting as a drill."

    Piplup leaps into the air, tilted 90 degrees forwards as if belly-sliding above the ground. It almost immediately begins spinning around in a drill-like fashion, dealing damage to foes. Its body deals 5% and knocks the foe backward and away, but the beak acts as a sweetspot, dealing up to four hits of 3% (12% total). If you hit a foe in front of Piplup, they'll get hit by the beak, and the four hits are guaranteed to chain. The final beak hit knocks the foe forwards at an angle similar to the ftilt, and is good for getting a foe away. Piplup will not continue dashing after the move ends, but if on wet ground, it can slide like at the end of a dash. Use this to your advantage, and follow up with another attack at low percents! Piplup can also soar right over ledges, including those of the Rain Dance cloud.

    AERIALS

    Neutral Aerial - Whirlpool
    "The user traps the target in a violent swirling whirlpool."

    Piplup spins around, a Mach Tornado-like whirlpool of water its own height (smaller than Mach Tornado) forming around it. Like the description says, this rather quick-to-start-and-end attack can trap foes in up to five hits of 2% each -- 10% total, with the last hit dealing a bit of upwards-forwards knockback. It lasts a while, so while you can drag your foe along for a decent distance, Piplup is also more open to attack if it misses. The move doesn't have much landing lag, though. Since the water hitbox makes a puddle as you land, and the landing hitbox is the same as the last hit knockback-wise, you could land while dragging a foe down, and then follow up with a powerful attack that uses water (like a smash attack)!

    Speaking of using up water, if you enhance this using the Rain Dance cloud's rain, the whirlpool's width will be multiplied by 1.5, so it can more easily catch opponents. Each hit also deals 2.5% damage, or 12.5% total. When under a hail cloud, the whirlpool is instead frozen solid, turning it into a sex kick move that deals 10~7% and knockback similar to Mario's nair. It has excellent reach for a sex kick, and also has low endlag and other staples of this move type.

    Forward Aerial - Bubble
    "A spray of countless bubbles is jetted at the opposing Pokémon."

    Piplup's forward air attack comes in the form of Bubble, where it leans forward and spews a stream of bubbles out of its mouth to hit multiple times in quick succession. The move is fairly quick to start and to end after Piplup shoots the bubbles, and they also have excellent range, reaching about a Piplup height in front of itself. The bubble attack lasts about 3/4 of a second (not counting lag), with a total of 7 hits which deal 1.5% each -- if you hit with all of them, it'll deal 10.5%. While this attack has excellent range, it only hits in front of Piplup, leaving it open to attack from above, below, or behind. It can be used to drag a foe down to the ground similarly to Whirlpool, which can come in handy for comboing. The final hit, by the way, deals horizontal knockback, at about a 15* angle. It can combo into itself, or be used to edgeguard. And by the way, the bubbles act as a water hitbox, so they can make puddles on the ground for Piplup to use.

    Enhanced by a Rain Dance cloud, this attack lets out a more rapid spray of bubbles, so instead of seven hits, there are now twelve (18% total). It'll also reach a bit farther, even more useful for spacing especially with the faster falling speed. Under the effects of Hail, the bubbles freeze shortly after being created, falling downward as hitboxes to hit foes below you, adding another use to this move. (You won't create extra bubbles however.)


    Back Aerial - Tail Whip
    "The user wags its tail cutely."

    Piplup wags its tail back and forth, extending it backwards. The tail, which grows a bit for this attack and acts as a disjointed hitbox, swings back and forth a total of three times -- the timing of this attack is similar to Link's fair. Nice emphasis on each individual strike, it's a pretty cool effect. Anyway, each hit deals 4% -- 12% total if you land each hit (although this isn't perfectly consistent, since there is a possibility that the foe can escape). The last hit deals backwards knockback that can KO at around 100% near the ledge, a nice combo finisher or edgeguard move. It's slower to start than the fair, though, and isn't as reliable. But you can land mid-attack and follow up with a grounded attack, which is nice. Landing during this move has noticeable lag, but if the ground is wet, it creates a wave similar to the one from dtilt behind Piplup.

    Up Aerial - Flip-lup
    Piplup leans back a little bit, then performs a full front flip -- the start of the flip also doubles as a headbutt. It's similar to Ness' up air attack, in fact. It'll deal 13% of damage and a decent bit of knockback. So yeah, this is a cloned move, sue me. It's pretty relevant to the rest of the set, though -- it's a good move to combo into after a puddle-bound Surf, poke through a Rain Dance platform, and stuff.

    Down Aerial - Drill Peck
    This attack is pretty much Piplup's dash attack, but aimed downwards. Same spinning, same damage (body: 5% and upwards-outwards knockback; beak: 4 hits of 3% and a meteor smash), but in midair. Like most of Piplup's other aerials, this hits multiple times if you can hit with the beak, and the final hit deals a meteor smash comparable to that of Kirby's dair at the end. It has minimal landing lag, so like Kirby's dair, it's a good move to start a ground combo from the air if you land before the meteor smash -- and with Piplup's water shenanigans, there's even more cool stuff to be pulled off! Sliding up smashes, wavedashes, that kinda stuff. Landing on water during the move also creates little waves to either side just like bair, which can cover your landing (as if you really needed it). Landing on ice, on the other hand, cracks it, creating a hitbox to either side that deals 5% and moderate upwards knockback to combo. The cracks extend a SBB to either side, making this another nice way to cover your landings.

    SMASHES

    Forward Smash - Scald
    "The user shoots boiling hot water at its target."

    Piplup's forward smash is one of its most powerful attacks. It charges up, in a pose as if it's about to pounce, and then opens its beak, lunges forwards, and shoots out a powerful blast of water! It also happens to be boiling-hot, with some of it turning into steam mid-attack (by the end of the animation, all of it will have turned into steam). Anyway, let's get to the point. It deals 16~22% of damage, KOing at around 130~90%. It has similar range and lag to Pikachu's fsmash (wait a minute, I thought I already made a Pikachu semi-clone), but doesn't have quite as much power, and the massive heat will also deal a little bit of recoil damage to Piplup upon release, 0~2% depending on the charge. Wait, so what makes up for that?!

    Alright, so remember how I said that some attacks will use up water that's on the ground? Well, those are the smash attacks. You can use them without water, but they're "super effective" if the ground is wet, at the cost of taking up a patch of water up to 4 SBB in width. Fully charged, they take up the whole puddle they're in and have a noticeable leap in power, although the amount of water itself has no effect on the attack's effectiveness (so you can fully charge a smash on just a little puddle of water and still get the full power of the attack). In the case of fsmash, it'll now deal a whopping 20~28% of damage, and KO at 90~70%! It's not entirely consistent to land this attack, let's just say that -- although the range does help.

    When standing on ice, this move changes yet again. When the boiling hot water falls to the ground, the icy cold causing it to do this rather than turning into steam, it'll create a big burst of steam due to hot and cold colliding! It's the size of a Bob-omb explosion, and deals 3/4 the damage of the smash itself. It covers the endlag quite effectively, thus making it a safer kill option, but does thaw that area of the icy ground.

    Oh, and as a visual effect for both versions of the move, Piplup's cheeks will get redder and redder from the heat as you charge the move, accompanied by a whistling-kettle sound.

    Up Smash - Aqua Jet
    "The user lunges at the target at a speed that makes it almost invisible." (again.)

    Piplup charges up, kneeling down low to the ground. Then after the charge is released, it fires a stream of water downward, in a similar fashion to its up special move. This propels Piplup 1~2.5 SBB up into the air, dealing 10~14% of damage and vertical knockback that KOs at around 120~80% depending on charge (note that since both KO measurements are taken from the center of FD, this knockback is in reality less than that of fsmash, and indeed has less KOing potential since fsmash can be used closer to the ledge). It's a good KO move especially thanks to its vertical reach, but Piplup can't act until it falls at least 1 SBB due to endlag, so this attack can be punished on whiff or block. Piplup may be able to land on a platform, though, to escape this endlag. (Maybe even a Rain Dance cloud!) Also, this move can snap to the ledge at the peak or during the endlag -- this is only really relevant, though, when you use it on a Rain Dance cloud in order to recover.

    Anyway, the puddle version will not only allow Piplup to perform a greatly extended sliding up smash thanks to reduced traction, but it also gains an increase in power -- 14~20% of damage, KOing at 100~70%, and traveling up 2~4 SBB. The endlag is doubled (you can't act until you fall 2 SBB or land), and it takes up some water, but hey, it's a lot more powerful! Indeed, this is an excellent finisher to an aerial combo, a way to poke at platforms with deadly kill power, or even a surprise anti-air -- just don't get too predictable, or that ending lag will become a real problem.

    On icy ground, this effectively works as a shorter, vertical uspec – it creates an icy wall. You'll deal the same damage. You can however press the attack button again after hitting a foe for a more powerful follow-up. You'll grab the foe, flip around a bit to face downward, and then slam 'em straight down into the ice column you just created! This deals half of the move's original damage, and sends them up a distance similar to Kirby's up throw. The wall of ice is destroyed, but you get some nice damage and low-percent combos out of this.

    Down Smash - Aqua Ring
    "The user envelops itself in a veil made of water."

    Eh, not quite, Pokédex. Piplup's down smash has it, after charging, spin around on its belly, creating a gushing ring of water around itself that hits multiple times before getting up and striking a cute little pose, very proud of this little trick. You guessed it, it's kinda similar to Pikachu's down smash! It "feels" very similar, but has a bit more reach and is disjointed due to the ring extending beyond Piplup's body. At the same time, though, it does lack in damage by comparison, dealing over its six hits a total of 10~14%. As for knockback, it's a high semi-spike (about a 30* upward, outward angle). It doesn't go quite far enough to KO, but it can lead into follow-ups or edgeguards depending on charge and the opponent's percent.

    On top of a puddle, this move actually becomes very different (and actually fits the in-game description). Rather than spinning around, Piplup lifts its foot up and then stomps it as a ring-shaped blast of water comes up from the ground below. It has similar horizontal range to the normal version, but reaches much higher -- about one Piplup head above, well, Piplup's head (or 1.5x its height). For a visual comparison, Squirtle's up smash is kinda similar in animation (except it's a ring instead of two normal bursts). Anyway, this powered-up version deals 15~21% as well as vertical knockback that can KO around 100~80%. It's a very powerful attack with consistent vertical knockback (it KOs at consistent percents from anywhere on the stage), and it's pretty quick too, but of course it takes up a lot of water. Then again, that isn't too hard to get back, although it can very easily become a hindrance. Also, the move takes a while to end, so it can be punished.

    On icy ground, you get yet another visual variation for this attack, this time being similar to Squirtle's up smash. You'll create two geysers of water to either side of you, about a Piplup width between you and each one. It's a ranged attack, but the little foot stomp, which is the same as the one in the puddle version, can damage foes up close for 5% and moderate knockback. The geysers themselves deal 10~14% and upward knockback that KOs at 130~100%. They'll then freeze over in the blink of an eye, acting as short walls just like in uspec that are about 1.5 Piplups tall. Since there are two of them, you can potentially bounce the foe back and forth between them.

    GRAB GAME

    Grab - Whirlpool
    Piplup conjures up a whirlpool for its grab, similarly to Greninja's. It's very slow also like Greninja's, but with a bit more range (up to one Piplup width away). The pummel is a rapid peck that deals 1% of damage. While this grab is very slow normally, it can be sped up by standing in a puddle -- it'll just use the water on the ground instead of making the whirlpool from scratch, speeding up the start-up lag while retaining its excellent range. By the way, the puddle that the whirlpool comes from won't go away as long as the foe is grabbed. If there was no puddle to begin with, though, the grab won't create one.

    When on icy ground, Piplup will instead stomp its foot onto the ground in order to create a crack in the ice directly in front of it, hopefully catching a foe by the feet in the hole which then closes up if it catches a foe. The grab is functionally pretty much the same, with the ice not going away during the grab and what not. The throws however change a bit.

    Up Throw - Geyser
    Piplup raises its arm in the air as if pointing upward, causing the tornado to launch the foe upward -- this deals 5% of damage and moderate upwards knockback. At low percents, Piplup should be able to follow up with an aerial attack, such as an up air -- Rain Dance's cloud platform is also useful here for extending your chain of attacks. It's not powerful enough to KO, though, and at kill percents, can't reliably chain into a KO move, so it's more useful as a low-percent combo throw.

    ...Unless you're standing in water, that is! A moment after the foe is thrown, the water from the puddle turns into a tall geyser that reaches up about 3 SBB. It's guaranteed to hit a foe (the throw's knockback is changed to accommodate this), dealing an extra 6% of damage. The geyser can KO vertically at around 130%, so it's a great KO throw, with the small cost of using up the puddle on the ground -- this is the case with most of the water-enhanced throws.

    If the foe is trapped in ice (i.e. you used the grab on ice), they'll be shot upward by a smaller water geyser that comes out of the hole, dealing 3% and a tiny bit of knockback. Then, a stalagmite of sorts made of ice will jut up suddenly from the hole, dealing a further 6%! This will impale the opponent at grab difficulty, just like Corrin's Dragon Lunge. Piplup is then free to follow up with an attack! Great for starting combos or even KOing, although your attacks' knockback will be noticeably weakened since they have to free the foe from the impalement first.

    Forward Throw - Kick-lup
    Piplup does a little hop into the air and leans back, then kicking the foe with both legs, propelling itself backward a tiny bit. The throw is very quick (its animation is similar to Cloud's fthrow), and deals 5% and moderate upward-forward knockback. It's a good get-off-me throw, and can potentially lead into an edgeguard, although it doesn't reliably combo or KO.

    Used on water, Piplup will angle its kick downward, causing the foe to go straight into prone and slide across the wet ground. The opponent won't stop sliding until reaching either the end of the wet ground, or traveling 7 SBB across it. Whilst sliding, foes can't exit prone, so they're ripe for a follow-up! By the way, Piplup can act very quickly out of this throw -- try wavedashing toward a foe while you're still in midair, then dashing towards the opponent to get a follow-up attack or two in! You'll just need a patch of water or ice to keep the foe sliding. The foe will also fall off ledges while sliding, so space it carefully. You can either set up for an edgeguard with a Rain Dance cloud's downward force if your foe is sent offstage, or a jab lock if you do this on a platform above the main stage.

    On ice, Piplup will still kick low to the ground, but this only frees the foe from the ice, putting them straight into a trip state. This is an effective way to get follow-ups of course, and keeps them closer for easier attacking. As a drawback, you can't get any super-good follow-ups without tech-chasing, since they can use a getup option immediately instead of having to slide all that distance. But if you're close to the ledge, this often works out better than the wet-ground version.

    Down Throw - Whirlpool
    Piplup forces the opponent onto their back, and then spins around, drilling into the foe with its feet as a small tornado of water forms around it. This deals rapid hits amounting to 6%, as well as a little bit of upward-forward knockback that's excellent for comboing (it's similar to Kirby's dthrow in this regard). With precise spacing, you can use this throw to put a foe into prone on a rain cloud platform if they miss their tech, allowing for jab locks!

    On top of wet ground, the whirlpool from the grab will go back on top of the water, spinning the foe around low to the ground. This deals the same damage and knockback, but has the distinction of allowing Piplup to move around during the throw animation -- while rather short, this allows for a lot of combos and setups. On ice, the area of the icy ground around the opponent spins instead, causing them to spin around as Piplup holds its beak forward to hit them on each rotation – 8 spins, 1.25% each, 10% total. Then the foe is released, being sent flying upward a fair bit similar to Mario's uthrow in terms of KB strength. This is your opportunity for a juggle!

    Back Throw - Skipping Stone
    Piplup grabs the whirlpool with its flippers and spins around like Mario's bthrow, taking the foe along for the ride. The whirlpool will disappear, releasing the foe behind Piplup for a decent bit of 30* upward-angled knockback and 4%. It's got set knockback that sends the foe a little bit horizontally with some vertical distance too; they'll land about a platform away. During this knockback, the foe will be on their back, spinning around horizontally (imagine lying down on a spinning platform). They'll be unable to act until they land (failing that, until they've been flying for a second or so), prime for a follow-up attack! The landing can, of course, be teched.

    If the foe happens to land in a puddle of water, they'll bounce right off of it like a stone thrown onto a lake, essentially repeating the knockback. The first bounce is untechable, but the second one can be teched. The one-second hitstun timer will also be reset when the foe bounces for the first time.
    Anyway, this is excellent for comboing foes with aerials or upward attacks. With a Rain Dance cloud, you can mix up the tech's timing by pushing the foe downward more and lessening the arc's height -- use this to throw off your foe. If the throw is done on ice, the force of you yanking the foe out from the icy ground is enough to deal 6% and send the foe flying at a higher, less-horizontal angle, no spinning required. This essentially means the foe will fly higher with each bounce upon landing on water; note that ice doesn't work for the skipping-stone effect. It's nice for aerial follow-ups, but on slopes can also mean that the foe exits the one-second hitstun before landing on the next puddle.

    MISCELLANEOUS

    Final Smash - Hydro Cannon
    "The target is hit by a watery blast."

    Piplup got the Smash Ball! It'll use the most powerful Water-type attack: Hydro Cannon! It charges up water (pretty much inhaling it, presumably using the vapor from the air), and then...

    [​IMG]
    Whoa! That's powerful.

    Normally Piplup can only use this when it's fully evolved into Empoleon, but with a Smash Ball, anything is possible. The beam is only about as tall as Piplup itself, but it stretches to the edge of the screen. It lasts about as long as Samus' Zero Laser, pushing the foe away from Piplup with each of its multiple hits. If you hit at the very beginning, you can deal 40% of damage! The final hit will KO at around 70% from center-stage. It's very powerful, and will make puddles all over the stage to boot.

    PLAYSTYLE

    Piplup's playstyle, generally speaking, is a turf-controller one. There are multiple ways to lay down water. At a distance, there's Aqua Tail. When approaching, there's Surf. For long-term wetness, there's Rain Dance. And some attacks make water while you attack! You'll have to constantly be doing this, since not only will it go away after time, but foes can also get rid of your water with attacks! Once you've got water, Piplup becomes a rush-down type character, with quick approach options, powerful attacks, and confusing mobility tools to throw its foes off. Use Rain Dance for platform shenanigans, Hydro Pump for wavedashes, Surf for a moving attack, and almost all of your attacks for combos.

    There's also some strategy with all of the ice stuff, since your Ice-type specials have different properties and uses, and freezing the ground itself affects your moves in different ways than if the water was still in liquid form. Freeze or thaw water to suit your strategies! Fsmash is a decent, if laggy, way to thaw water early.
    Your weaknesses are, generally, your light weight, poor range on non-water-based attacks, and the fact that you need water to be "super effective." That said, Piplup is prepared to take on the all-stars of Smash! As always, feedback is greatly appreciated, and I hope you enjoyed the set! :)

    Like what you see? See some more over at my Make Your Move Hub! :D
     
    #8 Munomario777, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2016
    Mario123311 and Reigaheres like this.
  9. FrozenRoy

    FrozenRoy
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    Smash Ace

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2007
    Messages:
    930
    Location:
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    "Feel the thorns' embrace."
    [​IMG]
    Zyra, Rise of the Thorns


    Zyra is a mage character from the online MOBA game League of Legends. Once an ancient carnivorous plant in the Kumugu Jungle, the passing by of a potent sorceress gave Zyra a second chance at life, as she devoured the sorceress and, using said magical potential combined with the sorceress' knowledge, crafted a human-like body of her own. No longer bound to the soil, the meat eating Zyra scours the land for her next meal and to experience the world anew.

    Zyra has a rather unique kit focused on not only using her abilities, but summoning plants to attack for her within her kit. Her passive, Rise of the Thorns, allows her to fire off a single parting vine shot of True Damage when she dies. Her W, Rampant Growth, grants passive Cooldown Reduction to Zyra and more importantly allows her to store plant seeds: Seeds can be placed on the ground to grant vision and, when struck by one of Zyra's abilities, grow into a plant which will attack for her. Her Q ability, Deadly Bloom, causes Zyra to cause thorns to suddenly burst out of the ground for magic damage to anyone hit. If she hits a seed, she creates a Thorn Spitter, which has a high ranged magic attack. Her E, Grasping Roots, has Zyra send vines forward in a line, snaring anyone it hits. Seeds hit by Grasping Roots sprout into Vine Lashers, which have harsh short ranged attacks that slow enemies that they hit. Her ultimate, Stranglethorns, causes her to grow a massive, twisted thicket around herself which deals magic damage, then after a moment snaps up and throw enemies into the air. Plants caught within Stranglethorns attack significantly faster, making it a deadly jungle for those who enter.


    Blossoming Statistics

    [​IMG]

    Zyra has about the same weight as an average Smasher, between Mario and Sonic in that regard, while being slightly taller than the average smasher, similiar to Peach with some width exchanged for height, enough to put her as a 7 in size numerically. Zyra's ground speed is rather unimpressive, clocking in at around the same as Lucario's, with above average traction.

    Aerially, Zyra is a slow fighter who doesn't move through the air fast and has slow aerial speed, with slightly above average aerial control but not especially noteworthy. Her first jump is decently good while her second jump is horribly average: Zyra can wall cling and crawl, but doesn't have other special Smash characteristics.


    Blooming Specials

    Side Special: Rampant Growth

    Zyra forms a seed in one of her thorn-clawed hands and tosses it forward, about one Battlefield Platform, though by aiming the control stick up you can send it high vertically and have it travel about half a Battlefield Platform. Press down and Zyra will perform a lower, further toss, making it go 1.5 Battlefield Platforms. Regardless of how the seed is thrown, it will deal 8% damage to anyone it hits, with knockback depending on which angle was chosen: Normal is, well, fairly standard knockback. Up will deal upwards knockback on the way up and a quite weak spike on the way down. Down will deal less overall knockback, but a lot of it is horizontal and little of it is vertical.

    The seed will sprout into a small, pink plant if it lands on the ground, which has 30 HP but otherwise does absolutely nothing. Zyra, however, can hit this seed with almost all of her attacks, not causing it any damage but instead causing it to sprout: What it sprouts into depends on the move, but it almost invariably is some form of minion. Minions will have however much HP is the default, for the most part, meaning it doesn't matter if the plant has 1 HP or 30, though if it loses all of its HP it will naturally be destroyed. Plants will last indefinitely and will only die when their HP is depleted, though once the plant is transformed this can change, and Plants will take double damage for a few moments after Zyra dies, meaning that is a prime time to clear out plants.

    Zyra can't just throw out seeds whenever she wants, either, she has to charge them: Zyra begins with two "charges" of Rampant Growth and can hold a maximum of three charges. Zyra gains an additional seed charge every 20 seconds: In addition, every 10 seconds that Zyra has a seed prepared will cause the seed to grow slightly, granting the seed an additional 5 HP when planted, with this happening up to two times (for a total of 10 bonus HP): This HP WILL transfer to the minions on top of their normal HP, so keep note on that. You can tell Zyra's seed count by looking at her model, where the seeds visibly grow on her body, with growing seeds being visibly larger. Zyra will also flash briefly when a seed is prepared and will repeatedly flash as if holding a Charge Shot if she has three seeds prepared.

    This move's starting and ending lag are just below average, so it isn't TOO frightening to throw out, but the hitbox IS quite small and can be somewhat oddly angled, so you still should be careful just tossing it out if foes are nearby.


    Down Special: Wall of Thorns

    Zyra flicks her finger upwards. causing a mass of prickly thorns to jut upwards in front of her about one Ganondorf tall without much width, dealing 13% damage and moderate upwards knockback to enemies she hits with this: This knockback has notable freeze frames on both Zyra and the foe on hit (Like Wolf's F-Tilt). During the Freeze Frames, foes will take bonus damage from the thorns of the wall, 2%-6% depending on how high up the wall they are, with lower dealing more damage. This move doesn't have especially large starting lag, but the ending lag is rather punishable, and the large freeze frames make it very deadly to have shielded. The wall of thorns will act as a solid wall while it is up, so it is possible to time it to stop projectiles and what have you as well. The thorns wither away and die during the ending lag of this move.

    Hitting a plant with this move will cause the plant to sprout along with the wall, providing nutrients and causing it to grow to 1.5 Ganondorfs in height, in addition to sticking around for up to 25 seconds or when it's 40 HP is depleted, although it does NOT stick around as a hitbox, but rather a solid wall. This Wall of Thorns will prick people who are knocked into it, though, digging into them for 4% damage, with Zyra herself also able to take this damage if she gets knocked into it, so it is a bit of a double edged sword: It also cuts the tech window in half for teching off it like a wall, since it is a bit tricky to tech something so thorny.

    Seeds from Zyra's Side Special will plant themselves inside of Zyra's thorn walls, allowing her to place them on walls and such by making one first, and will fall to the ground and embed themselves on the spot if the thorn wall is destroyed, albeit while also taking 6% damage from the uprooting.


    Up Special: Thorn Whip

    Zyra whips one of her hands forwards, appropriately causing a large, thorny vine to whip forward! Or, rather, in whatever direction you choose: The vine itself deals 10% damage upon hitting anyone and has a range of 1.25 Battlefield Platforms, though it can be charged for up to 2 Battlefield Platforms of range. Zyra will also pull herself to any opponent she hits...or any terrain: Yes, it is a tether recovery! It is more of a Melee-esque tether recovery than a Brawl-esque one though, as Zyra will pull herself to any terrain she can latch onto, meaning she can also use this to zip around the stage, as the speed she travels is a fair amount faster than her ground or air speed. Zyra can only use her tether once in the air without landing on the ground, unless she hits an opponent with it, in which case she can use it again ala Falcon Dive, though this is capped at 3 times in the air to prevent abuses given Zyra pulls herself to the foe. The starting lag on this has a bit of large windup, but the ending lag is fairly short: Zyra has a very small frame advantage upon pulling herself to the foe unless they shield it.

    If Zyra hits one of her seeds with this move, she will NOT pull herself to it, but retract the vine as if she missed while the plant grows into an appropriately named plant called a Thorn Whip. This Plant is medium sized, with a thorn-y vine constantly wiggling upwards out of it as a hurtbox as well, and by default doesn't seem to do much of anything, unless enemies happen to get within its attack radius (Which is about 1/3rd the size of a Smart Bomb blast). When they do, the Thorn Whip will whip it's thorny vine at the nearest enemy, dealing 6% damage on hit and pulling the enemy to the Thorn Whip's location with the same range as Zyra's own thorn whip. Largely useful to force the opponent into situations where they need to move or get repositioned, the Thorn Whip will deal a small amount of constant 1% non-flinching damage while being touched, so it can rack some damage with its pull. The Thorn Whip can only pull once every 4.5 seconds (even if it misses) and will look less vibrant while it is unable to pull people. The plant has 25 HP and no maximum duration.

    Thorn Whips are especially useful on your thorn walls, as they will drag opponents into the thorn walls and thus have them take the thorn wall's spike damage and be hit away, making them tough to get rid of, decently damaging to get hit by and an attractive nuisance.


    Neutral Special: Pollinate

    Zyra closes her eyes and concentrates in place, before snapping her fingers, causing a large amount of pollen to burst out of her and around her. This move is a non-storable charge move that deals 9%-27% damage and KOs at 200%-80%, with a similiar overall charge time to Eruption, slightly shorter. Starting lag is short, but it has somewhat long ending lag, the attack's radius increasing with charge as well: At no charge, it is basically just a bit past Zyra's body, but larger charges make it a decently sized sphere of pollen. Small charge bursts of pollen are an excellent GTFO tool of Zyra's and if she gets into a spot to get to very high charge, then it makes an excellent finisher and damage dealer.

    Hitting a seed with this will cause it to sprout into a Honey Catcher, a plant which sits flat on the ground with five leaves and an open center. The Honey Catcher gathers energy from Smashers in the same way a bee collects pollen from a flower, but with attacks: Every time any attack is used within a Battlefield Platform of the Honey Catcher and within 1.5 Ganondorfs above it, the Honey Catcher will gather energy from it, causing a small amount of sweet yellow nectar to pool in the middle of it (Think of how nectar looks in the Pikmin games). There's no limit to the amount of Nectar that a Honey Catcher can create, but it does nothing until the Honey Catcher's large 50 HP is depleted or under one other specific circumstance I will get to. Honey Catchers have no attacks of their own and thus are entirely free to be wailed upon as much as the foe wants.

    When a Honey Catcher dies, the plant will wither away, but the nectar will pop out and in place, appearing on the ground as a consumable item. The nectar will heal whoever drinks it, friend or foe, for 1/4th of the damage that was "absorbed" (Absorbing does not reduce damage), meaning that the usual minimum is to heal 12.5% (1/4th of 50%), and it will heal a maximum of 50% HP, which is very large! In fact, if the nectar hits 50 HP worth of healing, the plant will plop the nectar out of the Honey Catcher in its consumable state and begin work on another batch, though this is incredibly difficult to do (It'd mean 200% worth of attacks near a Honey Catcher but not killing it!). If you can pull it off, however, the Honey Catcher can become a seemingly unending farm of healing...just be careful that the opponent can use it. Also be careful consuming it: Be it for you or the foe, nectar takes significantly longer to use than the standard consumable, and if you get hit out of it it'll remain on the ground and you get NOTHING.

    Finally, Zyra can also pollinate plants that have already sprouted, which will cause pollen to grow on them: A no charge Pollinate will cause it to take a whole 20 seconds to germinate, wholly unviable as a consistant plan, but repeated uses or full charges reduce the amount of time, down to a minimum of 4 seconds. Plants which have had pollen germinate in them will visibly have the pollen hanging off of them: When that plant dies, the pollen will explode, dealing 6% and non-flinching pushback knockback in a brief area around it. The pollen will then fall to the ground with 12 HP, growing in HP over time until it reaches 30 HP after just over 5 seconds, which will cause it to sprout into one of the normal seeds from Zyra's Side Special, which will then be able to be used like any seed. Pollinating is difficult to get going and hard to keep up, but it can reward Zyra by making her plants incredibly hard to kill, which is a reward all its own.


    Budding Smashes

    Forward Smash: Grasping Roots

    Zyra scrapes her claws across the ground, sending out a rush of grasping, vine-y roots 1.25-1.75 Battlefield Platforms ahead of her. They don't deal especially large damage for a smash attack, 18%-23%, and they don't really deal knockback: Instead, this attack will briefly root enemies in place, able to perform all actions except moving (Things like rolls are simply performed in place, as if trying to roll against a ledge). This time increases slightly with charge, with something like 1.5 seconds base and 3 seconds fully charged, and enemies cannot be ensnared/rooted in place again during it or for half a second afterwards, keeping it from being an easy shield break or perma-root. This move has below average starting lag and roughly average ending lag. Note that the roots are not especially tall, so jumping over them is not hard. This move is notable for being very good at stopping approaches, which makes up for the fact that while many of Zyra's attacks are ranged or disjointed, they often are more midrange without charge.

    Roots roll across the ground and thus can be jumped over, and will follow the shape of the stage as they move, which can be especially noteworthy with your Walls of Thorn, as Zyra can root them in place and then have them take the weak hitbox as the root ends unless they dodge or shield it, but of course timing for that limits your options for dodging her other assaults, and timing this properly on an enemy going for the ledge can lead to strong edgeguard chances.

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    Hitting a seed will cause it to sprout into a Vine Lasher, as seen above. Vine Lashers are melee ranged stationary minions who will attack anyone who gets in their range with a fierce vine lash, which deals 11% damage and similiar knockback to a tipped Marth Forward Tilt, with range slightly less than said forward tilt. Vine Lashers will leave painful vine remnants inside anyone they hit which stick around for about 3 seconds: Getting hit while they are inside you will not only extend the duration for a second, but will cause an additional 3% damage and a quite small boost in the amount of hitstun you take. While Zyra is not a combo character, the bit of hitstun hesitation can open up some low % combos and is also good for gaining more free time on hits, and Zyra like any character has some natural combos to take advantage of it. Vine Lashers have 25 HP.


    Down Smash: Stranglethorns

    Zyra places a hand to the ground as she lets out a sinister grin, causing huge thicket of thorns to quicky grow around her, which then snap upwards for a brief moment, dealing 21%-27% damage and knockback that KOs at 120%-80% before staying on the ground for 5 seconds after use. This attack has decent base range, half a Battlefield Platform to each side, but at max charge it has quite large range, one Battlefield Platform to each side. The snapping up is quite small, almost ground level, at base, but it is about Mario's height at max charge. The starting lag on this is surprisingly slightly low for the thorns to come out, but there is a brief delay before the snap up and hitbox occurs, meaning it is overall average, and the ending lag is fairly long. In addition, the snapping up motion is quite short, so the hitbox does not stay out long.

    Stranglethorns have no effect on your seeds, but instead will boost the plants up and empower them while the thorns are out (Meaning that if you are hit after they are out but before they snap up, the snap will be interrupted but the thorns will remain). Plants with downtime on their abilities have those abilities cooldown 50% faster and their attacks deal 1.3x damage (Including stationary ones like your wall). Honey Catchers will also gather 1/3rd of the attack's essence instead of 1/4th. This effect persists for 5 seconds, though only if the plants are actually within the thicket (Meaning charge time also increases that range!). The middle of the thicket is also a 10 HP hurtbox where Zyra first unleashed the Stranglethorns, which can be depleted to cause them to wither away twice as fast, though given this is an attack and it will probably be defended by plants this is hardly easy. Overall, Stranglethorns are another strong approach breaker which also succeed with high setup, but loses a lot of value with improper or no setup.


    Up Smash: Tower of Thorns

    Zyra crosses her arms as she raises them to the sky, causing a mass of vines to rise around her, as if covering her, dealing 19%-25% damage to anyone they hit and fairly nice knockback, 115%-90%. Lacking in horizontal range, this hits a fair bit above Zyra without a large amount of starting lag, though it has somewhat large ending lag. The vines wlll actually protect Zyra slightly while around her, preventing 50% of damage from melee attacks and stopping projectiles with their vine-y mass, though Zyra can be grabbed out of the vines easily for full damage (Nor will they reduce damage before they pop out). Three vines are made with no charge, five with full charge, as a largely flavor note.

    Hitting a seed with this move will create a Seedhugger, a fairly small plant with a scary looking "mouth" hole in it (Like a fusion of a Rafflesia flower and a Venus Fly Trap), with small 3-5 vines sprouting out of it based on the Up Smash charge. By default the Seedhugger is quite fragile, with 12 HP, but each second of charge on Up Smash adds an extra 6 HP, meaning it can have up to 24 HP. Seedhuggers drag themselves across the ground at half the speed of Jigglypuff's dash speed, but will increase to 2/3rd Jigglypuff's Dash Speed at maximum charge. Seedhugger's will attempt to latch onto opponents with their short ranged vines, which will deal 2% damage but not interrupt actions and if it hits, will cause the Seedhugger to latch onto that enemy. It will then deal 3% damage by biting into the foe and over 2.5 seconds attempt to inject its seeds into the foe, during which time it must be shaked off like a poison flower. Seedhuggers will bounce off of shielding foes, taking minor hitstun and being unable to latch on, but once latched on shielding won't stop them from implanting seeds.

    If it is not shaken off, it will detatch from the foe with 6 less HP than before (Withering away if it had 6 or less HP) and the seeds will gestate inside of the foe over another 2.5 seconds, before a Seedhugger of the same charge as the one that imPLANTed it bursts out of the foe for 5% damage, meaning it deals a total of 10% damage, in addition to giving you a free Seedhugger. While this means they can in theory expand indefinitely and provide self-sufficient plants, Seedhuggers have no defense aside from trying to make more of themselves, so similiar to a Honey Catcher they need rather close monitoring. Seedhuggers still lose 6 HP if shaken off, as well, so charge also allows Seedhuggers to potentially create more of itself or to survive failures easier. Shielding can stop the 5% damage, but the Seedhugger always comes out.


    Seeded Standards

    Down Tilt: Deadly Bloom

    Zyra points a finger down and uses her plant-y magic to cause a deadly bushel of thorns to bloom, a quite quick move that deals 8% damage and knocks people away from Zyra with fairly good base knockback, a quintessential move to get people off your back, though the hitbox is rather small and doesn't last long, going along with the fact that as mentioned it is quite quick on both ends makes it a very spammable move.

    Using this on a seed creates a Thorn Spitter, which is about the same size as your Vine Lasher. The Thorn Spitter has 25 HP and will spit out, well, a thorn every second. This thorn is about the size of Sheik's needle and deals a mere 2% damage with no hitstun or knockback, but it can put these out at a rather fast pace. The range on these needles is 1 Battlefield Platform and 1.25 Ganondorfs high. Thorn Spitters will shoot these out regardless of if anyone is in range, aimed at the nearest opponent regardless of range, so they are rather tricky to take out while taking no damage. Fighting in an area with Thorn Spitters lined around can seriously add to your damage and harass potential, making them an excellent plant to pick up.


    Jab: One, Two, Chow

    Zyra performs a 1-2 combo with her fists, dealing 4% damage per hit, before slinging her arm forward and throwing a vine 0.75 Battlefield Platforms forward for 8% damage, a surprisingly long range end to a rather quick and easy to land jab combo, but the ending lag as the vine retracts is rather harsh for a jab. Ending lag on just the first hits is a lot more forgiving, but a lot of power is in the third hit, and he first two have little launching power, though even the third jab hit is a bit low on GTFO power.

    As per usual, hitting a seed with this generates a special effect, though only the third hit of the jab will do so, allowing you to safely use the first two hits without messing things up. This plant creature is a Thorn Scuttler, which scuttles around on four thorn-y leg-like appendages at a fairly slow speed with 18 HP. Thorn Scuttlers are a minor yer versatile minion that specializes in having a few attacks and being a nuisance. It's most common is simply to stick one of it's thorn-legs out in a direction, dealing 6% and minor knockback on quite a quick attack: Thorn Scuttlers are rather aggressive, so they can be a bit of a nuisance. It's second attack has it charge in place for a moment, before suddenly thrusting out it's legs in all directions, a surprisingly potent attack that deals 14% damage and can KO at 180%. Short ranged, but pretty potent on a minion you can make by a jab attack.

    The Thorn Scuttler's third attack has it scrape it's thorns against the ground, before rushing forward a little over one Battlefield Platform in a charge, dealing multiple hits of 2% (Totaling 10% if they all hit) and dragging the opponent along: There's no big hit at the end like many other multihit moves, so it is a lot better for repositioning, but it leaves the Thorn Scuttler quite vulnerable at the end of the move, along with being slightly telegraphed. But with weak, strong and versatile attacks, the Thorn Scuttler is a moving piece in Zyra's growing jungle.


    Forward Tilt: Vine Strike

    Zyra flings a vine forward in front of her, a decently long ranged and disjointed move with range a bit above an average Marth sword slash, dealing 11% damage and decent knockback, though it won't KO until about 235% so it is hardly a KO move. Starting lag on this isn't too long, but the vine takes a moment to retreat, making it rather punishable if spammed. A good option in Zyra's mid-range toolbox, able to either pressure foes as Zyra approaches them or to force reactions from approaching foes.

    As usual, smacking a seed with this allows you to sprout a plant, in this case a Vine Swinger. Vine Swingers appear much like normal, unsprouted plants, except that they will have a single, green, leafty vine sticking out of them, which constantly swings and spins in place, gathering power. When foes get within 0.75 of a BFP to either side of it or 1.25 Ganondorfs above it, it will lash its vine out at them, dealing 6%-20% damage that KOs at 600%-180% based on how long it has been charging its attack, with maximum charge taking 3 seconds. The lashing is rather slow and thus gives opponents quite a while to react to it, and the Vine Swinger cannot lash out immediately after attacking, having 1.5 seconds of downtime before it can begin gathering power or attacking again. This is a good window to deplete its 20 HP, with the vine flopped on the ground and thus a long hurtbox.


    Up Tilt: Venus Grip

    One of Zyra's claws is scraped against the ground before she slashes it upwards, spinning once in a graceful yet deadly strike. enemies struck by this claw take 9% damage and rather weak upwards knockback, which makes this Zyra's go-to move for setups, in contrast to Down Tilt's spacing properties and Forward Tilt's utility and overall strength, especially because this move has pretty low lag on both ends, a bit more starting lag than ending lag.

    Seeds struck by this move will sprout into a Venus Fly Trap, which has the appearance of said plant as one would expect, and is connected to the ground by a stem about half a Ganondorf tall and quite thin, with the mouth-y petal head being about 3/4ths of a Bowser in width and Ivysaurian in height, their mouths hanging open and waiting. Venus Fly Traps will do nothing on their own and thus depleting their 24 HP can be rather trivial without any help. The inside of the Venus Fly Trap is essentially a platform, and if a foe lands on it, the Venus Fly Trap will snap shut over about half of a second, trapping and chewing on the foe for another half of a second while dealing 4 hits of 2% (8% total), before spitting the foe out upwards with weak-moderate knockback. Zyra herself can stand on the Venus Fly Trap "platform" with no issue, being a plant controller and all, and so can use it as a launching platform for attacks, although seeds will not sprout on the Venus Fly Trap.

    If the Venus Fly Trap's mouth is hit by an attack, then it will automatically snap shut after half of a second, doing its normal damage to anyone within, including Zyra herself! For this reason, one should be careful getting on the Venus Fly Trap. Zyra herself can hit the head of the Venus Fly Trap (never damaging it, though) to do this herself, allowing her to set the snap up and try to get a foe in at the same time, attacks which Zyra launches from WITHIN the Venus Fly Trap will not do this. Venus Fly Traps attached to Thorn Walls will not act as platforms, due to being horizontal and all, but will instead trigger on touch or if a character is hit into them (Zyra included).

    Zyra appreciates not only the solid damage from the Venus Fly Trap and the ability to use it as a living platform, but the knockback it provides is quite nice for setting up further assaults, and the duration is very useful for Zyra and her plants, as it affords her a smidge of time to properly plan for the situation, and plants like the Vine Swinger will love it, the Vine Swinger for example charging until the foe is shot out of the Venus Fly Trap and then letting it rip in the direction of the foe.


    Dash Attack: Cracking Whip

    Zyra leaps into the air out of her dash, just a little in height, and shoots a pair of vines forward from her arms about 0.66 of a Battlefield Platform, with the loud crack of a whip as the vines reach the end of their destination. The bulk of the vines deal only 10% damage and solid, unspectacular forwards knockback, but the tips of the vines are a sweetspot which deals 16% damage and pretty potent damage, KOing at 130%, making it one of Zyra's more potent KO moves in fact, although one should keep in mind this move has quite a lot of end lag attached to it as Zyra falls to the ground while retracting her vines, and slightly longer than average starting lag as she jumps up. With her wide array of summons and moves like her Wall of Thorns, Zyra has a fair amount of ways to try and set this sweetspot up as well.

    Smacking a plant with this attack will create a Plantsect, one of Zyra's more rare moving minions, which appears the size of an unsprotued plant, but as a leaf-y green, insect-y looking plant, with small leaf wings, a thin looking shell of leaf and grass, and long, dangling, vine-y/plant-y appendages. Plantsects will patrol an area 0.66 of a Battlefield Platform and half of a Ganondorf up and down where they are created, patrolling vertically if created on a thorn wall, and will otherwise leave opponents alone. If an opponent gets inside their area of defense and are spotted, the Plantsect will fly over them, and either try to ram them for 8% damage and weak knockback, or will flail one of their appendages at the foe, dealing 11% and actually KOing at 190%, the first attack is below average in lag on both end, while the second attack is above average in lag.

    Plantsects will try and head towards plants inside of its zone of influence, targetting sprouted plants first, and will land and feed on them for 1.5 seconds where it will not attack or perform anything else, leaving it wide open, although this process will heal 9% of the Plantsect's 18 HP, and in fact can overheal the Plantsect to 36 HP if left undisturbed. Plantsects will only use each plant once per 6 seconds and will fly to the nearest plant afterwards. If the plant that the Plantsect fed on was Pollinated, then it will carry the pollination to the next plant, giving that plant the same level of pollination as the first one.

    Plantsects will be especially drawn to Honey Catchers with honey in them of all plants and will target them first and specifically, drinking the nectar within instead of simply feeding on the plant as usual, and healing for the normal amount the sweet nectar normally would if undisturbed. If it completes its feeding process, then flowers will bloom all over the Plantsect, kind of like a Pikmin, and its behavoir will change rather dramatically, aggressively pursuing foes at its moderate-slow pace and no longer patrolling an area. In addition to the two base attacks it has, it will gain two new attacks, one of which is to shoot a stream of nectar forward, dealing up to 3 hits of 3% damage and light knockback that pushes foes to the edge of the stream: The Plantsect will continue to move during this move, with low starting lag but high ending lag, and so it can end up dragging foes around a little.

    The other is a risky move that the Plantsect will rarely employ, where it will shake and rattle and rumble, before exploding in a small area blast of pollen and nectar around it, which is very powerful, dealing 20% damage and actually KOing at 100%, making it one of Zyra's best KO options of all! However, it is very laggy to start, the ending lag is quite bad, it is hard to control on a minion, and the Plantsect will deflower after the move, losing any overhealed HP it gained and returning to patrol status in the new area. Extremely powerful, extremely risky.


    Aerial Dew

    Up Aerial: Tough Pluff

    Zyra spins once with a claw outstretched above her, shooting forward a somewhat thin vine from said claw, in a three-hitbox attack. The first hitbox is the meat of the vine, everything except the tip, which deals 10% damage and light knockback upwards, a somewhat high damaging juggle-esque Up Aerial, largely due to it being harder to juggle with than your average up aerial due to this move having a slightly laggier than normal ending lag, while the tip of the vine ups the damage to 13% and instead spikes people down, though it is not an especially strong spike, it is about the strength of a Mario Forward Aerial spike, which means the foe and Zyra will usually end up in close quarters. Finally, the claw itself deals 7% damage, weaker upwards knockback than the vine and is a touch of a sourspot for the move, although it does help give it the slightest of horizontal range (the vine has essentially none) and is useful for hitting plants. Starting lag on this move is a touch longer than normal.

    Hitting a plant with this move will cause it to sprout into a Pluff, which takes the appearance of a seeding dandelion (you know, the kind you blow and scatter the seeds everywhere?), tall but thin save for the bulbous top. It will slowly and steadily rise with its 21 HP and will not do much on the way, a meager 3% damage and light knockback out of its path while floating up, ascends slowly and goes 3 Ganondorfs heigh. Afterwards, the Pluff will spin down and send its seeds flying all around, which serve as somewhat erratic projectiles that deal 1% damage and no knockback or hitstun, though they are numerous, about 22 of them are released over the loooong duration of the Pluff going back to the ground, although with no hitstun and not much clumping it is hard to get hit by multiples of these. Still, this is a good way to control aerial space with the threat of damage. The Pluff, once grounded, will rest on the ground for 2.5 seconds, regrowing its seeds and vulnerable to attack. If a Pluff is sprouted on a Thorn Wall, then it will rise and fall horizontally, and will simply fly off stage if no Thorn Wall is in place for it to return to.


    Down Aerial: Circling Rose

    Zyra goes upside down and spins her clawed hand under her, a jagged, thorny flower sprouting from it and spinning as well, slicing foes for multiple hits of 2% that ultimately add up to a fairly strong 14% damage, the flower having a purple-pink hue with Zyra's default outfit. The starting lag on this is shorter than you'd think and unlike many moves of these types, the ending lag is not horrible punishable, and is again more like an average aerial, however the duration is long and it only hits below Zyra, so it is very punishable. Zyra can try and hold foe's in place or drag them along with this move's multiple hits, however, and it does have fairly good damage if you hit with a lot of it.

    Touch a plant with this and it will bloom and sprout into a Bounce Flower. Bounce Flowers, as you may expect, bounce up characters when they land on them, being fairly wide (about 3/4ths of a Bowser width) but extremely flat, and having 7 petals of the same color as the flower Zyra uses with this attack. Aerial moves are not interrupted when using a Bounce Flower, so this opens up a surprising array of tactical aerial options, and Zyra can bounce herself into the air during the same Down Aerial that creates the Bounce Flower, with characters being bounced 1.5x the distance of their first jump. Bounce Flower's have a massive 35 HP, but they have absolutely no attacking properties, and so are extremely easy to damage when one is so inclined to do so.

    Bounce Flowers can be made on Thorn walls and they will bounce people horizontally while doing so, which can open an entirely new tactical array as Zyra and her foe bounce left and right and up and down while using their flurry of moves against each other, and it can serve as a bit of an edgeguard/zoning tool as well. Bounce Flowers last a maximum of 30 seconds before wilting away into nothingness, so don't expect this to be an everlasting bloom.


    Back Aerial: Lash Out

    Zyra swings her arm behind her, lashing out with a swinging vine, which reaches out about half of a Bowser width behind Zyra, and will smack anyone hit by it for 12% damage and moderate knockback, it'll get foes out of Zyra's face, but it won't give her a lot of follow-up potential and while the starting lag is average, the ending lag is a bit bad as the vine wriggles and returns to her. This is all well and good on its own, but if Zyra's vine makes contact with a wall (including her Wall of Vines), the control stick may be used to control Zyra's momentum much more strongly, either flicking for Zyra to swiftly whip herself in that direction or a tilt for a more gentle turning, which allows her a rather odd way of momentum cancelling and a quirky way to carry herself in aerial combat, essentially since you can use it to "transfer" bounce flower momentum and the like. This move can be angled up or down ala many tilts.

    A plant pricked by this will produce a Snipertunia at the plant's location, which takes the appearance of a rather small (Olimar sized) petunia of hues which vary based on your color choice. Snipertunia's have only 17 HP and will not attack often, with the petunia appearing closed, during which time it gathers energy, and it will not attack no matter what distress it is put under by the foe. In fact, Snipertunia's will not attack at all without help, and instead charge up a single shot, which deals 7%-30% damage based on charge and KOs at 555%-65%: Although it takes a full 5 seconds to reach full charge, so you need QUITE a nice setup to keep your Snipertunia alive long enough. When it has reached max charge, it will flash lightly and appear just a touch more open.

    Snipertunia's will instead attack when Zyra brushes against them with any attack, taking it as a cue and command, opening up and firing at the direction the nearest foe is in at the time with the projectile having infinite range, taking the appearance of a seed 1.5x the size of a Deku Nut, and at max charge glowing softly with solar energy. Zyra can hit the foe and the Snipertunia at the same time, of course, but it should be noted that the Snipertunia takes about 1/3rd of a second to fire, so it is hardly instant, although the projectile travels at the speed of Falco's laser, which means that foes will almost always have some way of at least reacting, Zyra's Forward Smash is probably the best way to combo with this by forcing them to not simply lead the shot and have it fly past them with the root, but it does leave it open to being shielded (it does little shield damage) easily. Placing a Snipertunia on a thorn wall can be nice, because it makes them harder to just smash up with their lower HP and no defenses. The Snipertunia's shots cannot go through stage or walls or the like, with the exception of the thorn walls, which it will pass through at half speed.


    Forward Aerial: Claw Scrape

    Zyra performs a forwards, upwards swipe with her claws, starting a bit below her, which is a fairly fast and yet potent motion, dealing 14% damage and KOing at 175%. While swift to start-up and execute, the ending lag is quite bad indeed, with the landing lag being bad but not quite AS bad. When grating upon a solid surface, such as against the bottom of the stage, the wall, or your wall of thorns, Zyra will dig up dirt with her claws and fling it forward, serving as a weak hitbox that is just outside the claw's normal hitbox and deals 4 hits of 1% with extremely weak knockback, but nonetheless provides fairly decent protection for a move where Zyra is very vulnerable.

    Slashing open a plant with this will cause it to sprout into a Wildthorn, a mass of plant-y, vine-y tentacles with lots of thorns, which wriggles and writhes rapidly in place, lashing out, with said plantacles sometimes looking like a claw almost as they wildly flail. This is a constant hitbox that deals 9% damage and moderate knockback, good base with weak scaling, largely serving to get foes away from you and thus is a very zone control plant, and you'll largely want it there to protect your other plants and is one of your only true trap plants. It has 22 HP, but as it is constantly a hitbox it is rather difficult to attack without getting hit away yourself, although fortunately the wildness o f the Wildthorn causes it to burn out naturally, and it will shrivel away after 8 seconds of existance. Placing these on your thorn walls is an especially nice treat, allowing Zyra an air trap to play off of. Zyra must hit with the claw and not the dirt to create this plant.


    Neutral Aerial: Spinning Flower

    Zyra performs a Pikachu-esque, 360 degree spin with her arms outstretched with two short vine-whips out stretching out from them, giving this move quite a bit of range for its 11% damage and moderate knockback, serving primarily as an all-arounder move thanks to its great range, however it is a bit laggy on both ends.

    Using this on a plant results in the plant shriveling up into a Tumbleweed, which then begins to blow away in the left/right direction Zyra was travelling, and if she was not travelling left or right then it will just go the way she faces, starting as a weak hitbox that deals but 1% and a flinch, but gains power over distance, speeding up from below Ganondorf's slowest walk speed to Ganondorf's dash speed, and maxing out at 18% damage that KOs at 160% after 1.25 Battlefields (Yes, Battlefields), which of course usually will not be reached. If the Tumbleweed hits a Wall of Thorns, then it will get stuck on the thorn wall, remaining a hitbox but not gaining momentum, and when the wall goes down, then it will resume travel in the opposite direction it was going, allowing Zyra to potentially keep it around for quite a while ineed. Tumbleweeds have 20 HP and are outprioritized by everything, and hitting them will reverse their direction.

    Tumbleweeds have no maximum distance and will continue to roll around until they hit something, are destroyed, or tumble right off the stage, so Zyra can potentially make the stage quite a dangerous place if she gets enough rolling around, albeit needing to make thorn walls to keep it going.


    Thorny Grip

    Grab: Thorn's Touch

    Zyra flings forward a thorny vine in a classic tether grab fashion, and much like your normal long ranged grab, Zyra has great reach but it is laggy on both ends, about your normal lag at the start of this type of grab but slightly less than usual ending lag. Range is just a hair about the average.

    Zyra can grab plants with this move as well, although the grab will always prioritize a foe over a plant. It will then prioritize sprouted plants over unsprouted ones. Zyra can press the shield or grab button to let go of a grabbed plant with no effect, if one is accidentally gripped. Zyra brings foes into her grip, but the vine remains outstretched to the plant when grabbing a plant and will function as a hurtbox. Plants cannot perform actions or otherwise do things while grabbed.


    Pummel: Rose Prick

    Zyra stabs the foe with one of her thorny appendages, dealing 3% damage, a bit faster than average. If a plant is grabbed, Zyra will instead pierce it with a thorn of the vine and send nutrients through it, healing the plant for 3%. Plants with a survival duration have it "healed" for 1 second for each pummel as well. This cannot overheal unless the plant can naturally overheal.

    Down Throw: Mulch

    Zyra grips the foe with a thorny vine and grinds them like an old timey, fleshy cheese, dealing rapidly damaging hits that total 6% before throwing them across the ground for another 5%, dealing 11% total with extremely shallow, forward knockback. Little bits of skin and flesh will fall from the foe during this time and Zyra's plants will eat it up if they are nearby, lowering any cooldowns they may have by 1 second and causing plants to aggressively target that foe until the end of their knockback arc if possible. Being that it is a shallow angle, this move is pretty prime for Zyra's melee game and is effective with your Forward Tilt, 3rd hit of Jab, Up Special, and various minions who similarly enjoy a foe close to the soil.

    If Zyra has used this throw on a plant, she will instead mulch the plant up and return it to herself, adding a seed to her inventory if possible and upgrading all other seeds in her inventory by 1 for the nutrients, with the stated benefits of a grown seed from the Side Special coming into play here. Sprouted plants will cause the seed which is gotten from this move to also grow one stage. This is a good way for Zyra to remove pesky accidental plants in her way and to create a potential surplus of extra HP and plants in exchange for time, and Zyra can also use it to get SOME use out of low HP, obviously soon to die plants.


    Up Throw: Soil Supplement

    Zyra scratches a clawed finger across the foe, coming to rest on the bottom of their chin if possible, before causing a burst of plant and thorn, similar to Down Tilt, to appear from it, sending the foe flying into the air with about 10% damage and quite high upwards knockback, enough to KO at 145% in fact. For Zyra, this is her KO throw, though as far as KO throws go it doesn't KO too early and it is difficult to use on fastfallers, although Zyra can also send foes into things like a Bounce Flower on the wall and so on.

    When used on plants, Zyra will suffuse them with some nice soil and magical energy, causing them to grow on up! This increases the size of the plant by 1.5x, along with any of the resultants from the plant: For example, a Snipertunia's seed is now 1.5x as large, and so on. Honey Catcher's not only have honey be 1.5x as large, but 1.5x as much can be gathered at one time, and Bounce Flowers will bounce people up 1.5x as far, and so on. The only plant which cannot be enlarged this way is your wall of thorns, for which I should hope is an obvious reason, and instead its spikes will simply grow out to the sides to 1.5x their length, making it easier for people to be hit into them. This makes it a lot easier for many plants to be hit, but it also increases their threat range, which is rather important when most of Zyra's plants are stationary. Seedhuggers who reproduce will have the new Seedhuggers also be enlarged.

    This process can, in fact, be done up to 3 times (requiring regrabs, of course), and you can make some truly gigantic and dangerous plants with this, but to do so also takes time, which usually means time spent not protecting your plants large hurtboxes, and with some of them they can get in the way if not planned for, like a Bounce Flower. Utilize with thought.


    Back Throw: Wither

    Zyra has a vine wrap around the foe, pondering for a brief moment, before making a somewhat seductive "come here" motion with a single finger...upon which the vine leans back and throws the foe behind Zyra, who turns around with a confident smirk as the foe flies away. This only deals 7% damage, mind you, but it has very low ending lag for Zyra in it, and in a lot of cases she can start moving before the foe's moderate knockback finishes, allowing her to either throw out an attack and make a minion to strike the foe where they land, or to more personally follow-up with an attack, although regrabs are impossible (using SSB4 mechanics).

    When used on a plant, Zyra will let out a devilish smirk as the vines tighten around the unsuspecting plant and she begins to drain the life out of the plant and using it to fuel herself. This is a process that takes some time as Zyra drains HP from the plant 6 HP at a time, the sunlight colored energy visibly moving through the thorny grabbing vine, and so Zyra herself is quite vulnerable during this time, reliant on her plants to protect her. This process can be stopped by hitting the shield or grab buttons, either for self-preservation or to preserve your plant life for later, but this has lag as Zyra retracts the plantacle. Alternately, Zyra will automatically end the throw when the last of the plant's HP is drained away, with the plant withering and dying on the spot. Along with the Honey Catcher, this allows Zyra to be self-sustaining despite her average weight, and is less likely to backfire than a Honey Catcher, but at the same time is significantly more punishable and requires Zyra to sacrifice setup. Honey Catchers themselves make great targets for this, but she should be careful of using this to kill one that has honey inside, since the foe is liable to wait and collect the dropped nectar when it dies while Zyra takes her lag.


    Forward Throw: THORNmail

    Masses of thorn-y vines begin to shoot out from Zyra's hand as she covers the foe in them, a total of eight, each of them piercing the foe's skin for 1% each, which deals a total of 8% damage, naturally, before Zyra grips the mass of vines and throws the foe forward for 4% damage and not very impressive knockback. Foes will be covered by this mess of thorn-y vines for 8 seconds, but for the most part, they won't be doing much, only activating when the foe attacks, whereupon the thorns will dig into the foe for 1% non-flinching damage, a fairly minor penalty, but it is quite a, aha, thorn in the side of the opponent, especially when they'll want to be attacking often to deal with Zyra's jungle. Combined with the initial damage, this is Zyra's premiere throw for pure damage racking.

    When used on a plant, Zyra will coat the plant in a protective covering of gnarly vines, which have 15 HP. While covered in vines, the plant will cease any activity, but at the same time the vines will protect them, as the 15 HP of vines must be removed before the foe can damage the plant within, allowing Zyra a way to hide away her plants for a while and save them to the right time. Plants will be free to move again either once the vines are broken open by the foe, at which point the plant will resume from where it was before, or when Zyra attacks the vines, which will cause them to retract around the plant and the plant will resume from where it was. The vines will be attackable and rest on the ground, and if Zyra attacks the plant again, they will protect the plant once more, allowing Zyra a surprising degree of help to keeping her plants alive. Vined plants cannot be grabbed. Vines die when the plant they are protecting dies as well and cannot be placed on Thorn Walls, which will do nothing if tried. While encased in vines, plants with a timer to their life will not tick that timer, so you can save those just as well.


    Final Smash: Thorn's Embrace

    Zyra raises her hands to the sky with a dramatic flourish, calling out her plants to embrace the foes, and a massive thicket of vines shoots out in every direction, ensnaring foes hit by them for 36% damage and what is for a Final Smash weak knockback, KOing at 90%, while Zyra herself also becomes covered in thorny vines. After this attack, they remain in the background, making the stage quite look like a jungle indeed, with Zyra and any foes hit by this move remaining wrapped in thorn-y vines for 8 seconds. Zyra will be protected inside of her THORNmail, taking 8% less damage from attacks, and in fact foes will take 8% on hitting her as the large thorns impale them.

    Foes, on the other hand, will have the thorns impale them whenever they attack, which deals 8% non-flinching damage, which isn't absurd or anything given it is a Final Smash that only deals 36% at base without huge knockback, and so foes will not want to attack an absurd amount during the 6 second duration, which can make dealing with Zyra's plants a bother. Speaking of her plants, they won't die of the timer until those 6 seconds are up, and will do anything based on waiting (like the Snipertunia's charge or Honey Catcher's catching) twice as fast, which is pretty neat.

    After 6 seconds, the vines shrivel and die off of people, the plants return to normal and the background returns to the normal. Goodbye, jungle!


    Playstyle: The Rules of Nature

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  10. Munomario777

    Munomario777
    Expand Collapse
    Smash Champion

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Messages:
    2,832
    Location:
    Charleston, South Carolina
    3DS FC:
    0387-9596-4480
    NNID:
    Munomario777
    [​IMG]

    "Time for adventure!" Captain Toad, debuting in Super Mario Galaxy for the Wii, got his first playable role in Super Mario 3D World before rising to stardom with his own title, Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker on Wii U. He's the most prominent individual Toad in the Super Mario series, and he's ready to take on all that Smash for Wii U has to offer!

    STATS

    Like in Treasure Tracker, Captain Toad has terrible mobility. He's got the absolute worst jumping ability in the game, with Jiggs' grounded jump height and without the extra midair jumps to compensate. In his game, Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, the Captain couldn't jump at all due to the weight of his backpack. However, the Captain is never one to come unprepared, so he's lightened his load a bit for Smash! He's still got a lot of stuff in there though, so it still keeps him from jumping as high as most other fighters -- Toads aren't the best jumpers to begin with. Captain Toad has low ground speed as well, matching that of the Villager. In the air he falls like a rock, with Fox's falling speed and Dedede's air speed. He does have a couple of strengths stats-wise, though. His small size allows him to dodge attacks more easily, and his heavy backpack gives him a disproportionately heavy weight stat! (It just about matches that of Samus.) This helps him survive for a long time, which he needs since his stats hinder his recovery greatly. He's also got a great traction stat, so what little speed he does build up, he can control very well.

    FLAVOR

    [​IMG]

    --Gamepad Hand--
    In 3D World and Treasure Tracker, you can use the Gamepad's touch screen to interact with the world. Freeze enemies, move blocks, stuff like that. Onscreen, this is represented by a little white, Mario-style glove. In Smash Bros., that hand will help Captain Toad out quite a bit, whenever he needs help. By which I mean, in certain animations and moves. It's like how with the Duck Hunt Dog, you're also controlling the guy with the NES Zapper on standby. Here, you're controlling the Captain and the Gamepad user.

    Standing:
    Captain Toad just stands there. He'll grip his backpack straps too, and occasionally look around. If he enters a dark area, he'll turn his headlamp on whenever he's in either a standing or walking animation (but not during other actions like dashing, falling, or attacking).

    Walking:
    Captain Toad walks forwards calmly, taking in his surroundings.

    Dashing:
    Captain Toad grips the straps of his backpack and dashes forwards, leaning back a bit with a slightly frightened, but still brave, look on his face.

    Crouching:
    The Captain crouches down as low as he can, gripping the top of his head and tugging it downwards with a fearful expression on his- I mean, a brave expression! Totally not scared. He IS the captain of the Toad Brigade, after all!

    Jump:
    Captain Toad uses the weight of his backpack to his advantage, hoisting it up to gain upwards momentum! Kinda like how Thor uses his hammer to fly. This won't get the Captain nearly as much distance, though -- lowest jump in the game, remember? -- and this animation makes for the longest jump squat in Smash 4. (By the way, he'll also jump with his actual legs in conjunction to the backpack shenanigans.)

    Midair Jump:
    Captain Toad hoists his backpack upwards again. This has the same height as his grounded jump, and it also has a "jump squat" unlike other midair jumps. However, Captain Toad does have super armor during this brief amount of time, kinda like Yoshi. It's an interesting counter tactic to be sure.

    Shielding:
    Captain Toad holds his backpack in front of his face as he shields, making for some decent protection (this is purely aesthetic).

    Spot Dodge:
    Captain Toad dodges into the background, reaching back and gripping his backpack.

    Dodge Roll:
    Captain Toad performs a simple roll, taking advantage of his bulbous mushroom head. While this dodge roll isn't the quickest or most long-ranged, it's still good for getting out of pressure and other roll-y stuff.

    Air Dodge:
    Captain Toad holds his backpack in front of his face as he dodges into the background. Phew, just dodged that one!

    Entrance Animation:
    A Warp Box is seen on the battlefield. It then explodes into a puff of smoke and confetti, revealing none other than the fearless Captain Toad! He looks to either side, holding his hand above his eyes, to get familiar with his new surroundings, and then preps for battle, saying "Time for adventure!"

    Up Taunt:
    Captain Toad opens his backpack and checks its contents.

    Side Taunt:
    Captain Toad looks to either side, putting one hand on his forehead as if to block the sunlight.

    Down Taunt:
    The Captain pulls out a map and studies for a brief moment, before putting it back in his backpack.

    Victory Pose:
    This.

    SPECIALS

    Neutral Special - Super Pickaxe

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    Captain Toad opens up his backpack and pulls out a glowing blue pickaxe with eyes. He, after holding it behind himself for some starting lag, then swings it in a clean, smooth overhead arc, dealing 15% of damage and knockback that can KO at around 90%. (If you've ever played The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, it's similar to the Skull Hammer in terms of animation.) He then puts away the pickaxe, suffering little endlag (but of course, there's that pesky startup lag). While this is a decent KO move, it also has a more unique function. Specifically, it'll destroy any structures that Captain Toad makes! (Yes, he can make structures.) Since it's so powerful and slow, it can be risky to use in the heat of battle to get rid of your structures, but a foe may accidentally come too close, and take a lot of damage and knockback! What are these "structures," you ask? Well...

    Up Special - Propeller Platform

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    Captain Toad has terrible jumps and air speed, but that doesn't mean he has no way to get some height in battle! Use this move, and an "invisible" platform the size of a Battlefield platform appears underneath Captain Toad as he appears scared for a moment (he was about to fall, after all). Once he regains his senses and looks around a bit, confused, (about .75 seconds of lag), the gamepad glove will move over the platform to make it fully visible (like revealing invisible stuff in 3D World), turning it into a Propeller Platform! It'll then start to fall at a moderate pace, descending about 1 SBB per second (the fall accelerates quite rapidly over time, soon falling at the Captain's own speed). However, input the move again, and the Gamepad glove comes in and gives the propeller a good spin, causing it to rise up! One spin will get you about 1.5 SBB in height, and you get three spins before you can't use any more, but they refresh every three seconds (even if you've not yet used all three). The platform can be controlled remotely, even if Captain Toad is on the other side of the battlefield. Captain Toad can move around on the platform -- after he gets past the initial shock, that is -- and use attacks too, or even jump off if he so pleases! He'll get his midair jump back, too.
    All things said and done, you can go up about 4.5 SBB total with this move. Surprisingly enough, Captain Toad has a rather excellent recovery! It's a bit slow to rise, but he can protect himself with attacks.

    On the ground, it'll be created above the Captain instead, to act as a sort of "shelter" against foes' attacks. You can make the propeller spin even if you're not standing on the platform -- but consequently, you can't create a new platform if one is already in play! It'll be destroyed when it hits the ground, the blast zone, or when you destroy it via the Pickaxe. When recovering, then, you'll need to make a choice: jump off the platform for some extra height, or destroy it so that you can use it again if you're hit/use it onstage when you get back? (If you destroy the platform whilst standing on top, it can't be used again until you get hit, land on solid ground, or grab a ledge.) Onstage, this move is essential to the Captain, as it allows him to escape from sticky situations as well as reach new heights with attacks! Plus, it's a boon when edgeguarding since you can use grounded attacks offstage (this also helps when fending off other edgeguarders).

    Side Special - Minecart

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    Captain Toad will walk forward with little startup lag as long as you hold the button, at his normal walking speed (decently fast, like Villager's). Unbeknownst to him, though, the hand is holding his backpack open, causing railroad tracks to drop out! Every Battlefield platform the Captain walks forward, a piece of track that size plops out. The tracks being placed have a hitbox, dealing 5% and knocking the foe behind the Captain a bit -- a good way to deter an opponent. When you let go of the button, both a stopper track (which, by the way, is also the first piece of track placed down) and a big minecart (the top of which is 1.5 SBB wide) come out of the backpack! The minecart's much louder thud catches the attention of the Captain (as well as dealing 15% and strong upwards-backwards KB), and he's shocked by what just appeared behind him! "Where'd that come from?" (He doesn't actually say that of course, it's just his facial expression that conveys that.) Before he can make sense of the whole thing, though, the glove appears once again and gives the minecart a hefty push, which takes a moment. If the input is held after the minecart comes out, the hand will first pick up the Captain and put him right on top of the minecart before pushing it.


    Once active, the minecart acts as a platform. It's a soft (drop-through) platform, with otherwise similar collision properties to a fighter. So it won't impede movement or anything. It'll continuously bounce back and forth between the two stopper tracks at either end, moving at ZSS's dashing speed. It normally won't deal damage whilst moving back and forth (because if it did, that'd be kinda annoying and/or broken), but if it catches a foe between the stopper track and itself, 10% and upwards knockback is dealt -- a prime opportunity for a follow-up from the Captain! Assuming he's on the minecart, that is. Even if you don't catch a foe with the stopper, though, attacking from the safety of the moving platform can be quite useful in general. It doesn't last forever though -- after bouncing off of the stopper tracks a total of four times (or traveling back and forth a total of five), it'll destroy the stopper altogether, becoming a runaway minecart! It'll now deal 10% and diagonally upwards knockback to anyone it hits (although it can still be stood on), going away if it hits a wall or obviously a blast zone. After the minecart's destroyed, the tracks follow suit, breaking into multiple pieces in a little "explosion" which doesn't deal damage (and doesn't look like it would either). This also applies if you break the minecart using the Super Pickaxe, and works in reverse too. If you use the move again while a minecart is already out, it won't do much -- only one of these minecarts (and its tracks) can be out at a time. You'll need to destroy it, or wait for it to go away on its own, in order to make a new minecart.

    In midair or if the button is tapped (this version of the move is also initiated if there's less than 1.5 platforms of space on the current platform), the move will skip straight to the runaway phase -- the minecart "poofs" into existence in a 3D World-style confetti-y explosion, Captain Toad inside it, and gets pushed forward by the hand. The whole thing is a hitbox with the same properties as the runaway version of the grounded minecart, but it's not a platform anymore -- instead, Captain Toad is in the minecart as an animation, similarly to Wario's bike. Like the bike, the minecart can be attacked, and Captain Toad can jump out to have the minecart keep going forward. While still in the minecart, Captain Toad can throw turnips in any direction with the A or B buttons -- these deal 5% of damage plus a bit of knockback, and travel in an arc similarly to Peach's, but a good bit faster and longer-ranged. It can be aimed with the control stick, and the turnip throw lacks any major lag. Since Captain Toad can jump out at any time, it's possible to ride in with a minecart, hit an opponent, and then jump out to land an aerial follow-up! Alternatively, follow up with a turnip or two, and then an aerial. The minecart is also useful for recovering, falling at only 2/3 the Captain's normal falling rate. That's about Lucas or Zelda's falling speed, for a point of reference. Since this move won't leave Captain Toad in helpless, it can be used in conjunction with a propeller platform for recovery! (If it's available to use, that is.)

    This is, overall, an excellent mobility tool, and a good way to make up for Captain Toad's lacking ground/air speed. While the grounded version is more effective since you can use any attack from it, it's also more time-consuming to set up. (Worth noting, though, is that if the Captain is attacked before he's done placing the tracks, the minecart and stopper will get knocked out of him, so the setup will still be finished.) The aerial/tapped version is still a fine mobility tool, and helps with recovering (especially with that reduced falling rate). But you won't be able to use it to recover if you've got
    a minecart and track all set up, so keep that in mind. Although it's only a matter of time before it derails and goes away, freeing it up again; you'll just have to survive that long offstage, usually with a Propeller Platform. A true Captain never gives up!

    Down Special - Turnip Cannon

    [​IMG]

    A small blue handle appears on the ground, right in front of Captain Toad. Not one to leave a switch unpulled, the Captain, well, pulls it (which takes about 3/4 of a second to do). Then a giant Turnip Cannon suddenly comes up out of the ground, with the Captain on top! Captain Toad can aim the cannon at a range of angles from 45* up to 45* down whilst on top of it, and he can jump off whenever he likes. He can get back on top to aim by "footstooling" the cannon, holding the jump button to stay on and releasing it to jump off again, or just tapping once to jump off immediately; the foe can also footstool it, but cannot hold the button to stay on top. (By the way, the Captain's footstool jump is a very useful way to gain height since, well, it goes very high.) The cannon will fire turnips in the given direction, which can travel pretty far much like the ones from the side special. They deal the same 5% of damage and bit of knockback, and are fired at a rate of one per second. The Captain is immune to these turnips, but the foe can counter them -- that is, they can be picked up like any other item with an aerial or other means. The Captain can pick them up too, to use as a throwing item -- as you'd expect, they deal the same damage and knockback. (To be clear, both the foe and Captain Toad can throw caught turnips.)

    The cannon can't be created in midair, but can be made on top of a propeller platform or minecart! It's like a mobile turret, but more turnip-y. Delicious! Put it on a minecart for horizontal movement, or a propeller platform to control its altitude! The turnip cannon doesn't go away over time unlike the other two, but it can be destroyed if its hefty 17 stamina points are depleted by foes' attacks. A good Captain, though, will protect his turnip cannon at all costs! ...Or destroy it with the Super Pickaxe to reposition it. Firing a constant barrage of turnips is an excellent way to pressure foes, extend combos, and supply Captain Toad with a steady stream of throwing items, and the cannon itself or its projectiles can be used as a shield of sorts, but the cannon itself is quite laggy to get onto the battlefield.

    Oh! And by the way, in a similar vein to Olimar's lead Pikmin, all of the Captain's structures will have a little colored arrow above them, in the same color as his player slot (red for P2, blue for P2, etc). This helps make things a bit less confusing in matches with more than one of the Captain present.


    AERIALS

    Grab Aerial - Grappling Hook

    [​IMG]

    With a midair grab input, Captain Toad can use a tool that just about any respectable adventurer has -- a trusty grappling hook! It's your standard tether recovery, with pretty much identical range, speed, damage, and knockback to Toon Link's midair hookshot. It'll deal 4% and moderate upward-forward knockback to foes. It's an excellent recovery option in conjunction with a propeller platform/minecart, or if they're unavailable to use. So don't worry, he's not totally screwed offstage if he can't use his minecart or platform. This also helps him get onto his platforms -- if it hits the propeller platform, minecart, or turnip cannon, the Captain will tether to it as if it was a ledge (even if he hits an opponent first). It won't auto-snap to it like a ledge, though, so the zair can still be used for attacking if a contraption is nearby. Other foes with zairs will act the same way, so be aware of that.

    Only the Captain, though, can grapple onto his turnip cannon, and it acts the same as "footstooling" it (you can use the grab button instead of the jump button to control it; tap the button without holding it to grapple over and then jump off instantly, or press and hold grab to get on top and aim). It's a great mobility tool, with how fast the zair comes out and how quickly the Captain can get to the jumping-off bit. The Captain's three structures can be used as grapple points for a boost in midair mobility -- keep this in mind when comboing and traversing the stage. If you're knocked off of your propeller platform when recovering, then rather than waiting for it to fall low enough to land on it (and likely falling to your own death in the process), try grappling over to it!

    The Turnip Cannon is likely the most useful grapple point, since the Captain gets an upwards boost from the footstool -- if you hit an opponent with the zair and then grapple to the cannon with the same zair, you can follow up on the zair's knockback with another aerial.

    Neutral Aerial - Super Gem Spin

    [​IMG]

    Captain Toad reaches back and pulls out a Super Gem -- the main collectible from his game, which he surely has quite a few of from all his adventures. He'll hold it in front of himself (like the above artwork) and then spin around in one quick, 360* spin before putting the gem away. This move is very quick to start and end, and the spin itself is quick too. The attack can of course hit to either side of the Captain (front -> back -> front), dealing 10% of damage and semi-spike knockback. It's very potent as an edgeguarding tool, since it has strong sideways knockback that will either KO a foe effectively, or make it a pain for them to recover.

    Despite the fact that the Captain can't jump very well, his aerials are actually pretty useful tools near the ground (emphasizing how he stays grounded in his games). His low jump height combined with a fast falling speed means that from a full hop, he can cover a variety of heights and return to the ground quickly. His nair is a great example of this; if you full hop and then nair right away, the Captain won't experience landing lag thanks to the autocancel frames! Use this to follow up on the semi-spike knockback with another attack, like another aerial or a zair. This is also a reliable follow-up to a zair if you grapple onto a cannon and jump off (as described at the end of zair's writeup).

    Forward Aerial - Backpack Swing
    Captain Toad reaches back with one hand and grips his backpack, swinging it around him in an arc as he himself spins around with it. He just barely manages to control the weight of it as he swings it around. The backpack deals a hefty 14% and horizontal knockback that can KO at around 120% from center-stage, but it's rather slow to start. It has good reach and a disjointed hitbox, though, and doesn't have too much cooldown. It can be used as a punishing move, or as a follow-up if you can get around the slow startup. It's got quite a punch, so try using it to finish off an opponent near the stage's edge or offstage. This move can just about autocancel from a full hop, but this requires impeccable timing.

    Back Aerial - Pickaxe Thrust

    [​IMG]

    Captain Toad pulls out a pickaxe (not to be confused with the Super Pickaxe from nspec; this one is less heavy and thus easier to wield but won't break structures), and then he thrusts it backward horizontally. The move is decently quick to start, lingers on for a bit, and deals 10% of damage and upwards-backwards knockback that can KO at around 130% from center-stage. A late hit will only deal 6% and a little bit of horizontal KB. It has pretty good reach behind the Captain, and due to that and its rather low landing lag, this is an excellent spacing tool near the ground. Hit with the late end of the lingering hitbox, and you should be able to reliably land a follow-up. Alternatively, land a clean hit close enough to the blast zone to send your foes flying!

    Up Aerial - Star Yo-Yo

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Captain Toad pulls out a Green Star or Power Star (it's a purely aesthetic difference that's decided at random), attached to his grappling hook by the top point of the star. He'll then swing the star in a semicircle arc like a yo-yo, from in front to above to behind. The star is about as tall as the Captain, and this attack has insane range, with a bit under a SBB of rope in between the Captain and the star (the star deals 8% of damage and moderate radial knockback). This, however, also results in a big blindspot where the move can't hit an up-close opponent. The move also takes quite some time, with the star not moving too quickly (but not too slowly either), so a foe can punish the attack if it whiffs. It's an excellent juggling and spacing tool, though, since you can land with it to cancel the move into moderate landing lag (which is in most cases faster than following through with the animation). The move is also rather slow to come out, so you've gotta full-hop it to get anything decent. At higher percents, this is a good follow-up after a nair, specifically its back hit, or following a zair -> turnip cannon footstool combo.

    Down Aerial - Backpack Spike
    Captain Toad reaches back and grabs his backpack, and then after a bit of startup lag, slams it downward! The motion is somewhat similar to Olimar's down aerial. It's a lot slower though, to start and end (the timing is similar to Ike's dair). It's very powerful, dealing 13% and a powerful spike! It also has good downward reach. There's potential for an odd but effective sort of Ken combo, with a zair-turnip-cannon setup to dair near the ledge. There's also a weak hitbox that lingers on for a bit, dealing 6% and moderate sideways knockback -- the lingering hitbox makes this a potentially decent landing tool, but there is, again, some pretty big endlag (as well as landing lag).

    STANDARDS

    Jab - Coin Pluck

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    Captain Toad's jab combo has him pluck a sprout that suddenly appears in front of him! (It's similar to how the Villager plucks a weed everyday for his down tilt.) This particular sprout can be plucked repeatedly to hit multiple times, each hit dealing 3%. You'll usually be able to land about three consecutive hits before the foe gets knocked too far away, reminiscent of Mario's utilt with two different hitboxes: one that keeps 'em up close, and another with some upward knockback to it. The jab is pretty quick to start and end, a nice tool to escape pressure. You may be able to get a follow-up if you only hit once (with the low, little-knockback hitbox), but there's not much hitstun either, so you can't do much -- it's usually best to just knock 'em up and then jump up with an aerial, or maybe an up tilt or something.

    Forward Tilt - Backpack Swing
    Captain Toad performs a motion similar to his fair, where he grabs his backpack and swings it in an arc (this time without spinning around with the pack, thanks to more stable footing). He just barely manages to control the weight of it as he swings it around. The backpack deals an unchanged 14%, and horizontal knockback that can KO at around 110% from the stage's middle. It's a bit more powerful than the fair knockback-wise, but for a tilt, it's very slow. It has decent reach and a disjointed hitbox, but again, it's super-slow. That said, it's an excellent punishing tool if your foe whiffs a slow enough attack -- the attack's range helps in this regard.

    Up Tilt - Potted Piranha Plant

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    To the Captain's surprise, his backpack opens up, and out comes a Potted Piranha Plant! With the aid of the hand pulling it upward, of course. What does he keep in there...? Anyway, the Captain will flinch forwards and cower in fear (as any sensible person would if a giant, man-eating plant came out of their backpack) as the Piranha Plant bites upwards! It acts similarly to Sonic's up aerial -- it hits once while it's rising up, and then once again as it bites. 4% and 7% respectively, for a total of 11% and upwards knockback. While there is a little bit of cooldown after this attack, it comes out very quickly. The move also has excellent vertical reach (although only the second hit can hit up high), and acts as a great anti-air thanks to its pretty wide horizontal reach and disjointed hitbox. For comboing, the only somewhat-reliable follow-up is an uair at low percents; this is mainly a get-off-me move, useful for getting some room to set up structures. But it can be used to KO if you use it close to the top blast zone, e.g. with a propeller platform. Speaking of which, this is also an effective move to fend off edgeguarders with!

    Down Tilt - Pickaxe Strike

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    Captain Toad wields the same pick he did in the bair, this time doing a more pickaxe-y thing with it -- he'll swing it in a downward arc toward the ground. The attack doesn't have a whole lot of reach horizontally and has some endlag as the pick gets stuck in the ground briefly, but covers a fair bit of space vertically and comes out pretty fast. The attack deals 10% of damage and knocks the foe forward at roughly a 30* upward angle, with substantial knockback to keep foes away (shielding or not). Hit a midair foe or one hanging on the ledge, and the move can spike near the very end! It's a guaranteed hit on a ledge-hanger without invulnerability. A foe trying to approach through the bottom of a drop-through platform (like the propeller platform) is also rather susceptible to this. Also, the move has more range if used at the edge of the platform (the pickaxe goes down underneath the ledge). While this version has a longer animation, it can be acted out of at the same time as the normal version. This can be used to attack and combo while riding a minecart past a foe!

    Dash Attack - Trip
    The hand, being a bit of a jerk, trips Captain Toad by putting itself in front of him while he's running! How rude. This works out in the Captain's favor though, because after the startup lag where he stumbles a bit and gets sent into up the air, he'll crash to the ground and slam down onto any nearby foes! This deals 15% of damage and upward-forward knockback that'll KO an opponent at center-stage from around 110%. This attack is quite powerful, and can be used as an effective finishing move and punish tool. However, it has some noticeable starting lag and quite a bit of cooldown, so it should be used sparingly -- for the sake of both the safety of the Captain, and also for the stability of his friendship with the glove.

    SMASHES

    Forward Smash - Turnip Toss

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    When you start charging this attack, the Captain begins to pluck a sprout from the ground, like the jab. This one, however, seems to be a bit harder to pluck -- he won't get it out until you release the charge. When he does, it's revealed to be a turnip -- just like the above image (but a bit bigger, about the size of the Captain's head). Now, the reason that the Captain keeps struggling during the charge, is because the turnip grows during the charge! (Like most plants, it grows while it's still in the ground.) At full charge, it's about as tall as the Captain himself! And he still somehow manages to pick it up. Then again, this should come as no surprise.

    Anyway, once the charge is released, Captain Toad will pull the turnip out of the ground and then throw it straight forward, swinging it over his head (like how stuff is thrown in Mario USA and Treasure Tracker). There's not a whole lot of lag between releasing the charge and throwing the turnip, but it does grow a bit with more charge. The turnips deal 5~15% damage (unlike most smashes, it doesn't multiply by 1.4x at full charge). A small turnip deals only moderate upward-forward knockback, whereas a big one can KO at around 90%! The turnips fly through the air rather fast, with once again a similar trajectory to Peach's sans speed.

    Uncharged, the turnip toss is a quick and spammable projectile that can keep foes away, and doesn't have much lag at all. With some charge however, it becomes a deadly long-range KO move that can punish a foe or work as a deadly edgeguard! Just be aware that the fully-charged turnip is quite laggy to toss. And of course, these turnips can be tossed from anywhere there's ground -- on a platform, a minecart, a propeller platform, you name it!

    Up Smash - Headlamp Shock
    Captain Toad will face the screen and crouch down during this attack's charge, bowing his head and holding his headlamp in a similar pose to the charge of Lucas' up smash. When the charge is released, the Captain looks upward in the blink of an eye, headbutting foes to deal a fixed 5% and tiny bit of upward knockback regardless of charge. Then his headlamp lets out a surge of electricity, dealing 9~13% and stunning the foe for the same duration as ZSS's down smash (after which it sends the foe at a 45* upward angle for some sizable knockback, but it won't KO). This attack isn't that slow to start and has little endlag, so it can be used to combo thanks to its paralyzing nature. An up tilt or aerial is the obvious choice for a follow-up, and those are effective, but with some set-up, the Captain can deliver even more powerful attacks. For example, if you ride a propeller platform upward and stun a foe as it's ascending, then they won't go up during the stun, but you and the platform will. Thus, you can get the foe in range for other grounded attacks, such as a powerful ftilt or dsmash (more on that in a sec). Alternatively, ride on a minecart to position yourself horizontally away from the foe for a potential fsmash or zair follow-up. Finally, waiting for the stun to end and grappling to a turnip cannon to chase the upward-forward knockback with an aerial can prove very effective!

    Down Smash - Backpack Spin

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    During the charge, Captain Toad sort of winds up, as if preparing to run (like this). When you release the charge, he'll start spinning around at high speeds, getting quite dizzy, falling down afterward. The attack comes in the form of hitting foes with his heavy backpack, and it lasts a good amount of time like Shulk's dsmash. This attack obviously doesn't have that amount of range, but it has a lot of power, dealing 18~25% and 45* knockback that'll KO at around 80~50% from center-stage. This is Captain Toad's most powerful attack for finishing off an opponent, and doesn't have that much startup lag. However, the Captain is left in a tripped state afterward, so in addition to the long duration and sizable endlag, you've got a tech chase from the opponent to worry about if you miss. Smart use of structures, however, can make this a much easier task. Ride in with a minecart and dsmash to approach with a KO move, cover yourself with a turnip cannon, or use the propeller platform to retreat if you miss (or combo into this from an up smash)! This move is of course very powerful, especially near the ledge, so it's worth the risk.


    GRAB GAME

    Grab - Clear Pipe

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    The gamepad glove pulls, out of the ground, a Clear Pipe! These are a common occurrence in the world of Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker as a convenient means of transportation, and can be found almost anywhere -- even underneath a Smash Bros. arena, it seems. Anyway, the pipe will trap an opponent inside it, if the grab is successful. This rather laggy grab also has some nice reach to it, the pipe being about a SBB wide and 1.5x as tall, and being created right in front of Captain Toad as he looks at it with curiosity.

    This grab has some rather unique properties. Firstly, if it doesn't catch an opponent (it only does this if the foe is standing in the pipe's range as it comes up), it can block attacks including projectiles! This can help cover a whiffed grab's ending lag, protecting the Captain from potential punishes. The foe inside, though, can still be damaged -- this can be useful when combined with Captain Toad's structures. The Turnip Cannon can shoot at the foe, and the minecart can even damage the foe if it catches 'em at a stopper track!

    If Captain Toad is standing at the edge of a platform, the pipe can instead appear out of a lower platform, drop-through or otherwise, which can lead to some interesting tactics -- for example, get on a high platform, grab a foe below you, and throw 'em up into you for a follow-up! Since two of the Captain's structures can be used as platforms, this is a useful property no matter which stage you're on. If there's no lower platform for the pipe to come up out of, it can instead come up out of a higher platform (e.g. a propeller platform), or even the lower blast zone. In the latter case, the top of the pipe comes up to 1.5 SBB above the Captain's foot level, the same as if it was used normally. You can quite easily wall out an opponent or catch them offstage with this grab, although since it only stays out for a moment before disappearing, good timing is crucial. But it is very possible to make a wall to keep your foe from reaching the ledge with some skill!


    [​IMG]

    As for the pummel, a Fuzzy enemy will come up out of the pipe, damaging the foe for 3% -- the pummel is fairly quick, to compensate for the grab's lack of speed. Overall, this grab is a pretty nice one aside from its speed, with special properties and excellent reach to give it unique uses.

    Up Throw - Piranha Plant


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    Suddenly, a Piranha Plant comes out of the clear pipe! It'll first start coming out, knocking the opponent out the top of the pipe for 3%, and then bite 'em for 8% and moderate upwards knockback. Captain Toad undergoes a bit of shock from this throw, being quite understandably surprised at the giant man-eating plant, but can act out of it fairly quickly, before the pipe even goes away.

    The knockback on this throw isn't good for either comboing and KOing normally, but the grab's unique properties give it some actual uses! Use it at a lower elevation than Captain Toad, and you can combo out of it as the foe is sent right to you! Alternatively, use a propeller platform or other such elevation to get the foe up high for a ceiling KO!

    Forward Throw - Slide Bowling
    The clear pipe bends to an angle of 45 degrees, facing away from Captain Toad, and then spits the foe out to deal 7%, sending them sliding along the ground a moderate distance, about half a stage's length or so at high percents. The opponent can also slide off of ledges, going into a tumble state which cannot be teched.

    While this is a more situational throw, it can be used for some setups -- for example, using this throw at the ledge with a propeller platform right below it will send the opponent into a prone state on your propeller platform, which can make for some follow-up potential or put your foe in a bad position. It's also possible to send the opponent sliding into a buffer track when a minecart's on its way. Your Turnip Cannon can also stop the foe's slide, which allows you to use the low-endlag throw to get some decent follow-ups.

    Down Throw - Ground Pound
    Captain Toad decides to jump up to the top of the clear pipe, and enter it with the signature Mario ground pound to see where it may lead. (I.e., the Yoshi Bomb.) Before this happens, though, the pipe retracts while he's doing the little spin, leading to a surprised expression on his face. The ground pound still goes on however, dealing 8% to the opponent as well as moderate upward knockback. At low percents it's an excellent combo tool. The cool thing is, though, if Captain Toad is higher up than the pipe, his ground pound will build up speed and power! Each SBB of height difference adds 2% and some knockback to the move -- jumping from the height of Battlefield's top platform makes it KO at 100%, and so on. It can KO pretty powerfully if you're up on a propeller platform!

    Back Throw - Clear Pipe Cannon


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    The clear pipe suddenly turns into a cannon! It'll launch the foe backwards at a bit of an upward angle, the blast sending Captain Toad backwards and straight off of his feet. The knockback is just a tad less powerful than Ness' back throw, and deals 10% of damage. It's obviously a super-powerful KO throw, and while the grab's slowness makes it tough to use, it is a dangerous threat to the foe nonetheless -- especially since you can use your grab from on top of platforms and the like!

    MISCELLANEOUS


    Final Smash - Starshroom


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    Captain Toad got the Smash Ball! He's suddenly picked up by the gamepad hand and taken off the top of the screen, and when he comes back down, he's piloting his Starshroom from Super Mario Galaxy! Dangling down as he flies it around are the Toad Brigade, of whom Captain Toad is, well, the Captain. Anyway, they'll dangle down from the rope as the Captain flies around, acting as a human- er, Toad ladder. The speed is about that of Captain Falcon's dash, but you can't move sideways. Anyway, the bottom Toad is also holding a mini-souped up Turnip Cannon! With a press of either attack button, it'll fire a turnip that explodes on contact with anything to deal 15% of damage and pretty strong upwards knockback, KOing at around 70%. The turnips' trajectory depends on which way the Toads are dangling, which depends on which way you're moving. The Starshroom itself deals 5% of damage and upwards knockback if you're moving; this KB is pretty much guaranteed to KO since you're at the top of the screen. After eight seconds, the Captain is ejected from the Starshroom as it and the Toad Brigade fly away -- this of course ends the Final Smash.

    Home Stage - Plucky Pass Beginnings
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    The first stage of Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, Plucky Pass Beginnings is a fitting home stage for the Captain. It's got a pretty basic structure, pretty much what you see above. To the left of Bomberman is a ledge with a pit below, and the walls on the right hand side of the wooden tower are gone as are the three gray brick blocks. Sprouts occasionally pop up and yield items when picked, growing back after some time (in the meantime, they look like those brown ones you can see dotted about). The stage is fairly simple overall, with a ramp, a soft platform (part of which is angled), and a raised area with a wall.

    But then there's the gimmick. In Treasure Tracker, moving the camera around is a vital part of the gameplay, and in Smash, it's the same way. So every minute or so, the battle freezes for a split-second as the stage rotates 180 degrees, bringing everything along for the ride -- the battlefield is pretty much mirrored. What's more, the stage itself changes too. See that area with the blue switch? That small area of ground -- you can see the seams if you look closely -- along with the wooden ramp and bridge leading to the tower will lift up, just like in Treasure Tracker, as a result of the switch being pulled. The bridge rises up to meet the top tower platform, and the ground itself (with the blue switch) is at the height of Bomberman's plateau. You can't go under the bridge from the bottom of the tower, thanks to a little wall that comes up with the bridge (this keeps fighters from getting stuck). After another minute, the stage flips back around, and the ground lowers again.

    The transformation will affect a lot of tactics -- the top of the tower is no longer a raised area for sniping, and the bottom of it is now a veritable fortress! The wall won't let you perform combos, but vertical KOs are made more effective due to the raised ground. With stage hazards off, the rotation, stage transformation, and pluckable sprouts are not present (but the stage still retains its unique layout). Like in Treasure Tracker itself, taking advantage of the changing environment is vital to performing well on this stage.

    Also, this is the stage's main music track. Probably with a cool-sounding remix too, and maybe even the original stage's theme. And a few other songs too, but you get the gist.

    Alternate Costumes - Toad Brigade


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    Captain Toad's alternate costumes are based on members of his faithful Toad Brigade! The blue, green, yellow, and purple ones are, anyway. There's also Captain Toadette as an alt, with a color swap of her own (not pictured). If you're using one of the Toad Brigade alts, by the way, the Captain will take that member's place in the Final Smash! (something something Alfonzo.)

    PLAYSTYLE


    You may have noticed this already, but Captain Toad's structures are the crux of his playstyle. Without them, you're kinda decent, with tools like nair and uair for spacing purposes, utilt and usmash for anti-air, fsmash for a basic spamming projectile, and a grab for... well, a grab. (Even a tether in midair!) You however are very slow, with terrible mobility and jumps, and terrible recovery as a result (but you are very heavy for your size).

    With structures, though, you can alleviate a lot of those problems. The minecart is your obvious go-to for getting around, with the tracks providing a more long-term option and the cart by itself providing a great tool for one-time mobility. You can bring hit-and-run to a whole new level by attacking while standing on the cart, almost like one of those fancy momentum characters. The propeller platform of course is a master at getting you into the air, and can also provide shelter, extend combos vertically, and of course be used for recovery. The turnip cannon is not only a good way to cover yourself with projectiles, but also to combo into said projectiles, get some throwing items to use, and even as a grappling point for zair for added mobility! Like in Treasure Tracker, Captain Toad uses the environment to his advantage to get around the stage and accomplish his goal.

    Captain Toad will generally want to space around with moves like uair, nair, fsmash, and zair, and make some space to set up his structures. Then you can use them to approach, combo, do mix-ups, and KO. Zip around the stage with tethers, ride your platforms to new heights, and come in at high speed with a minecart! Captain Toad's main weakness is his performance without structures -- he's a heavy fast faller, making him vulnerable to some combos, and despite his fast falling sped, his low air speed can make him easy to juggle. He also cannot get around effectively at all like this. This can be a problem, since you need to actually hit your structures with the pickaxe to destroy them before they eventually go away. Nevertheless, the fearless Captain is more than ready to venture into Smash and take on the best it has to offer!
    As always, feedback is greatly appreciated, and I hope you enjoyed the set! :)

    Like what you see? See some more over at my Make Your Move Hub! :D
     
  11. FrozenRoy

    FrozenRoy
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    Smash Ace

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2007
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    Location:
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    #466
    [​IMG]
    Electivire, the Thunderbolt Pokemon

    Electivire is the evolution of Electabuzz, introduced in the fourth generation of Pokemon. It's ability, Motor Drive, causes it to gain speed when hit by electric attacks, which enhances the very physical (rare for an electric type!) and somewhat bulky stat line it has, though its Hidden Ability Vital Spirit can instead be chosen to become immune to sleep. It's two plug-like tails can be used to charge and discharge electricity, similar to Elekid's plug, and blue sparks will crackle across its horns as it charges up its electricity. it is pure Electric type, despite looking like it could be part-Fighting type.

    Statistics

    Electivire is a rather heavyweight, bulky Pokemon, weighing about as much as Samus. Electivire can be compred to Donkey Kong in size and general shape, although Electivire is slightly smaller (mostly in height). Electivire is, befitting the archetype, quite slow as well, moving around just a touch faster than King D3. Traction is woefully average.

    Aerially, Electivire is a pretty fast faller who has very fast air speed, with just a touch better aerial control than normal, making him oddly speedy in the air and a real pain to KO off the top, though it also makes it more difficult to recover, not helped by his second jump being terribly average. His first jump is pretty good, though.


    Mechanic: Motor Drive

    Being Electivire's signature ability, it is no surprise that he brings Motor Drive to the game of Smash Brothers as well, although it isn't QUITE as potent: Electivire still takes full damage from any electric attack, however, when Electivre clashes with or perfect shields an electric attack, Electivire gains a stack of Motor Drive. Of course, this very limited method isn't the only way Electivire can do so, nor even the primary way. But we shall get to that later. There can be a maximum of 5 stacks of Motor Drive, blue sparks will signal how much charge Electivire has. The more frequent and violent the sparking, the more charge he has.

    Electivire's metabolism literally runs on electricity, so just like in the games, this move speeds up Electivire: With maximum stacks, Electivire is just below Captain Falcon in speed in fact, which makes him absolutely terrifying when you consider he's a heavyweight with solid air stats, giving Electivire almost the best of all worlds. In addition, for each stack of Motor Drive that Electivire has, he gains 2% super armor on the STARTING LAG of all of his attacks, which thusly maxes out at 10% super armor on all of his attacks, which when you have someone going Captain Falcon speed at Samus' weight...yeah, pretty scary.

    Electivire also has some move specific buffs and ways to expend Motor Drive, but we'll get to that as we work through the moveset. All stacks of Motor Drive are lost on death. In addition, Electivire can only hold a charge for so long, and just like a car's alternater he needs to generate and use electricity to keep it. If Electivire does not expend or create a charge every 7.5 seconds, he automatically will lose one charge to the power of physics. Even if he already has 5 stacks, doing something that would gain him a stack counts as gaining a stack.


    Specials

    Side Special: Shock Wave

    The horns of Electivire spark with electricity as it holds one of its large palms forward, shooting out a ring of mass of electriciy that travels halfway between the distance of an unsmashed Link Side Special and a smashed one. Enemies who are hit by this attack only take 8% damage and pretty pathetic knockback, though the hitstun is slightly higher than your average attack, which can feel rather like the cheat as the attack has somewhat longer than average starting lag, though the ending lag is pretty low, which because the projectile travels quite slowly means that Electivire has good time to pressure the foe alongside it. The projectile itself is 1.25x the size of Luigi's fireball.

    The key thing is that this attack, like a boomerang, rebounds once it reaches the end of its flight path, the electricity crackling and noticably becoming more wild. This not only makes it deal slightly more damage, 10%, but it allows Electivire to gain more electricity than it used when coming into contact with it, absorbing it and gaining one stack of Motor Drive! This is the main way that Electivire will seek to gain Motor Drive, but as mentioned, it is slightly laggy, and it only does so on the return trip: So it is a struggle between Electivire and the foe for who controls the Shock Wave's area! When Electivire absorbs the Shock Wave, it naturally disappears from the battlefield, so Electivire cannot use this to cover for himself at the same time, and he starts off quite slow too, plus having to go through the attack's lag, so while he has a hitbox, it is also stacked against him in a way.

    If Electivire manages to hit the foe with just the edge of when the Shock Wave would boomerang, the hitstun will ensure they get hit by both attacks, resulting in 18% damage and dramatically higher knockback, though it still only KOs at 140%. When a Shock Wave hits the foe, no matter how, it will instantly rebound as per usual, so Electivire should consider using this attack as a more close range, melee attack as well, which can give him Motor Drive charges by rebounding it to him quickly and safely...but also is a lot more dangerous.


    Neutral Special: Giant Thunder Punch

    Electivire's tail-plugs connect together, looking as if they form a circuit, as Electivire begins winding his arm up for a huge punch like Donkey Kong, electricity crackling at the end of his fist. This move has many more similarities to Donkey Kong's Giant Punch as well, having slightly more starting lag and slightly less ending lag than the Giant Punch. How much and how fast the Giant Thunder Punch can charge depends on the number of Motor Drive stacks that Electivire has. When Electivire has a full charge, he will flash and his tail-plugs will spark, but if he gains more Motor Drive stacks he will cease to flash and spark as he can now charge more, with each Motor Drive level of charge producting more fierce tail-sparks. Obviously, this is storable.

    0 Motor Drive Stacks: This move takes half the time of the Giant Punch to charge, but only deals 6%-12% damage based on charge, and the knockback os in the low-medium side. Overall, not particularly worth it, but at the worst it will prepare some charge level for when you gave Motor Drive stacks, and this move does have decent range, so it isn't horrible.

    1 Motor Drive Stack: This move now deals 9%-17% damage and has medium knockback, though still nothing too impressive and with a bit low scaling, only KOs at 300%-175% or so. The super armor on your Motor Drive is doubled compared to normal, meaning 4% for 1 stack, and this is true of every further Giant Thunder Punch level + Motor Drive stack: 8% for Level 2, 12% for 3, 16% for 4 and 20% for 5! This only applies if the attack is fully charged, but it can turn this into a fairly solid counter move, with the first level primarily being for weak jabs and projectiles, but Level 2 can beat out weak tilts and 3 beats out most tilts: By the time you hit 5, even smashes can be tanked and the opponent's face smashed in by the Giant Thunder Punch! This move takes 3/4ths the time of the Giant Punch to charge.

    2 Motor Drive Stacks: This attack now deals 12%-23%, and you start to be able to really punch fools in now, KOing at about 185%-125%. Comparitively, the KO power is significantly worse than a Giant Punch, which this takes as long to charge for, however Elctivire will throw its body forward about 1/3rd of a Battlefield Platform when throwing this out, giving this move really strong range, and this is the first really strong phase of the Giant Thunder Punch. This stays for all higher charge levels, of course.

    3 Motor Drive Stacks: The Giant Thunder Punch now deals a very potent 15%-34% damage based on charge that KOs at 155%-105%, not as big of a jump in raw power as 1 -> 2, but this begins the Giant Thunder Punch having significantly more safety, as the electricity on Electivire's fist as it charges gets noticably more intense now, causing it to become a static and weak hitbox that deals 4% damage and very little knockback/hitstun, similar to Mewtwo's Shadow Ball charge damage. At low damage percents on the foe, this can even true combo into an instantly released Giant Thunder Punch. While this has high protective range, it doesn't cover Electivire's entire body, and it depends on where the fist is swinging as well, so it is an imperfect defense. The hits can also combo into each other 1-2 times at low-mid percentages. This takes 1.25x

    4 Motor Drive Stacks: Now we're talking, the punch does a massive 19%-45% damage based on charge now, KOing at 145%-80%: As you may have noticed, Electivire's punch KOs less than DK's, but it does tremendous damage. The electricity intensifies once more while charging this move, creating a static thing and thus a very weak suction effect based on the foe's distance relative to Electivire, with it pulling people towards Electivire at half Ganondorf's dash speed from a Battlefield Platform away to 3/4ths Ganondorf's Dash Speed right up close. Not a huge difference, but still worth being aware of. This move has 1.5x a Giant Punch's charge time.

    5 Motor Drive Stacks: It's the final stage! With a thundering, echoing roar, Electivire puts it's full electrical power into the punch, dealing a colossal 25%-58% damage! This isn't just colossal in damage, but the range is massive, as the lightning surges out of Electivire's fist in a vaguely fist-shaped cone, dealing half the damage and knockback of the base version. On that note, this move KOs at 115%-65%, making this practically a OHKO...if you can charge it all the way and get 5 Motor Drive stacks AND hit with it given how telegraphed it is you'll want to hit with it. You'll probably end up damage racking the foe later than the fully charged KO point just by trying to charge, though this can lead to some really cheap following stocks if the foe is careless. This attack should heavily be considered as a counter move possibility if it gets charged up, due to its 20% super armor.

    The cone's size depends on charge: 1/3rd a Battlefield Platform and half a Ganondorf at minimum charge and a full Battlefield Platform that goes a Ganondorf high at max charge. When you have 5 Motor Drive stacks, consider adding the uncharged Giant Thunder Punch to your arsenal a lot, due to its impressive reach with the cone and being about as easy to throw out as an uncharged Donkey Punch. Just remember that super armor only applies when fully charged! Also remember this takes quite a while to charge: 1.75x a Giant Punch's charge time! Oh, and Electivire still charges forward and has all the previous benefits as usual.


    Down Special: Discharge

    Electivire's horns and tail-plugs crackle violently with electricity, moreso with each stack of Motor Drive that it has acquired, as Electivire clenches its fist, before it flexes a strong pose as a maelstrom of lightning surges around it! This discharges ALL of Electivire's accumulated Motor Drive stacks for one potent attack, although he needs Motor Drive stacks to make it potent in the first place: Without any stacks, he deals a meager 4% damage, hardly any knockback, and Electivire will even make a disappointed noise not dissimilar to a generator shutting down.

    With a full Motor Drive charge, however, this move becomes extremely potent, dealing 41% damage and KOing at 71%, which is pretty huge, as it is much less conditional than a full charge 5 Motor Drive Giant Thunder Punch and its starting lag is decently fast, which makes it a shockingly strong move to throw out when you hit 5 Motor Drive charges (For reference, 3 Motor Drive charges is about 20% damage that KOs at 111%, so a decently strong smash). This move's ending lag is somewhat punishable, however: Not absurdly so, mind, but you can't throw it out and expect no retribution if you flub it. Still, it isn't as long as one might expect of such a strong attack. One large weakness of this attack is that it has pitiful range, only a bit outside of Electivire's body, so it usually requires a little bit of setup to get so close, and Electivire has to put himself in a somewhat risky spot to use it. The reward is certainly worth it, however.

    This move deals pretty high hitstun at later levels of Motor Drive, however the ending lag and KO power involved means it's usually little more than a fancy, electric animation.


    Up Special: Wild Bolt

    Electivire scrunches down as lightning sparks between its two horns, shooting out a jagged, yellow lightning bolt with an electric blue border around it, which can be controlled like PK Thunder, although Electivire's is slower, but it has more responsive turning and is a bit longer and thicker (although it lacks the large ball "head" of PK Thunder). Electivire's fall speed is decreased slightly while controlling this Wild Bolt, allowing him to hit himself with the Wild Bolt decently well for recovery. The bolt itself deals 11% damage on impact and low knockback, with decently high hitstun, towards whatever direction the Wild Bolt was (IE if it was above you, you get hit up). The starting lag on this is fairly long, however it actually has short ending lag, especially compared to when Ness/Lucas hit/whiff with their PK Thunders.

    If Electivire hits himself, he will be launched in that direction ala PK Thunder 2, entire body spinning and swirling with energy and a fist raised in the direction flying, Electivire going about half the distance of Ness' PK Thunder 2 by default. He's still a potent hitbox though, naturally, dealing 24% damage that KOs at 82%, making this a rather powerful tool to hit with but not an AMAZING one. Just as important as the recovery, mind you, is the fact that this grants Electivire a Motor Drive charge, and is Electivire's most direct means to pump his Motor Drive up. Wild Bolt II here has a lot longer ending lag, though, and thus is a rather poor choice JUST for building Motor Drive charge.

    Electivire does not enter helpless if he doesn't hit himself, although he cannot launch another Wild Bolt out unless hit as per usual, but he WILL enter helpless with Wild Bolt II...unless he has at least 3 Motor Drive charges, which gives him enough power to not be drained and enter helpless, although he still cannot Wild Bolt again. Each Motor Drive charge also increases the range on Wild Bolt II, adding 1/4th the range of Ness' PK Thunder 2 to it, meaning at 5 Motor Drive stacks he goes 1.5x the distance of Ness, making it a rather incredible recovery...when you don't just gimp the bolt itself, anyway.


    Smashes

    Down Smash: Electric Terrain

    Electivire's fists glows with an awesome electric energy as his horns spark with power, before he slams his fists to both sides of him, Donkey Kong Down Smash style. This is a fairly strong move, dealing 16%-21% damage, but the KO power is not as strong as one might think, only KOing at 147%-112%. The lag on this move is similarly comparable to Donkey Kong's Down Smash, complete with essentially having the same lag as that move, but Electivire has slightly shorter range than Donkey Kong does.

    When Electivire's fists impact the ground, he will send out a shock wave of electric energy to both sides of him, roughly half of a Battlefield Platform to both sides of him. This shockwave is close to (but not on) the ground, with very little vertical range to it, and deals only 10%-12% damage, popping foes into the air with somewhat small knockback to it, before reversing course upon reaching its maximum range and converging back on where Electivire used the move: The horizontal knockback of the move is away from Electivire when going out and towards Electivire when going in. The shockwaves has an extremely brief, difficult to hit sweetspot when they meet up and converge in the middle, which deals 24%-31% damage and KOs at 117%-92%. This is an extremely specific hitbox only out for a moment, however. If Electivire is standing in this hitbox when it is made, and not at any other point during this move, then Electivire will absorb the burst of electricity into itself as it dissipates, granting him one Motor Drive stack: This is rather risky because the Down Smash is somewhat laggy, the shock waves travel slow and he needs to be in a very specific spot that leaves him super vulnerable to gain a stack, however it is the best way to gain Motor Drive stacks while knocking foes away.

    For 5 seconds + 1 second for every stack of Motor Drive that Electivire has on after the shock waves converge, the area that the Electric Terrain travelled (With 1.25 Ganondorfs of height) will be filled with static electricity, as seen by the ocassional little spark and a slight yellow tint in the air. This does nothing on its own, but instead works to boost and modify Electivire's moves, making it rather an area of power for Electivire, and an Electivire in Electric Terrain with some Motor Drive stacks is a terrifying sight indeed. Here is how Electric Terrain affects Electivire's moves mentioned so far.

    Side Special/Shock Wave: No change.

    Neutral Special/Giant Thunder Punch: Electivire may charge Giant Thunder Punch as if it had one more level in Motor Drive than its current level, although it does not need to reach it to be considered "max charge", and this extra charge level is lost if Electivire leaves the Electric Terrain or it expires. On that note, if Electivire expends Motor Drive charge while his Neutral Special is fully charged, it is downgraded to a fully charged version of the new level of Neutral Special (IE 4 -> 3 = 3rd level of GTP) and Electivire must charge back up to the "extra" level if he gains a Motor Drive stack or re-enters the Electric Terrain. If Electivire gains a Motor Drive stack while he is charged to his "extra" level, though, he will simply stay there as it is now his true maximum charge.

    Down Special/Discharge: Extra lightning and static is energized by the release of such strong energy from Electivire, causing a hitbox to radiate further outward from Electivire, giving this move decent range, however this hitbox only deals half the damage and knockback of the damage and knockback the Discharge would do. This gives the Discharge extreme safety and makes it a lot easier to hit however. This will not only consume Electivire's Motor Drive stacks, but will then instantly end Electric Terrain as well, so be very carefl when you throw this out.

    Up Special/Wild Bolt: The Wild Bolt projectile moves significantly faster inside of Electric Terrain while retaining its amazing turning ability.

    Further Electric Terrain changes will, of course, be explained in the moves themselves (the Specials infodump is basically just because the Specials kinda had to be described first!).

    Electric Terrain is one of Electivire's level up moves from the sixth generation and Electivire is one of only 5 Pokemon who learn it by level up, making it a pretty fitting move to give.


    Up Smash: Thunderbolt

    Electricity surges between Electivire's horns and at the ends of his tail plugs, before the tail-plugs stand straight up and both release a burst of electricity upwards as Electivire gives a hearty laugh. This visually brings to mind Pikachu's Thunder, except backwards, and Electivire's bolt is only half the width of Pikachu's Thunder, though it will still go flying off the top of the screen if the stage lacks a ceiling. The bolt deals a pretty solid 18%-24% damage, with vertical knockback that KOs at 165%-140%, meaning it isn't especially strong but is not all that weak either. The starting lag on this is pretty long as electricity is gathered, but the ending lag is pretty short, so it is difficult to punish if Electivire manages to get it off.

    Each stack of Motor Drive will not make this do more damage per se, but will increase the thickness of the bolt, with it being 1.33x the thickness of Thunder at maximum Motor Drive. The importance here comes in that, after 5 seconds, the Thunderbolt will drop back down in the very same spot that it was released at, dealing the same damage as before, although it is always at minimum size: This is because while up in the sky, the extra thickness of the bolt spreads into new Thunderbolts, which will each drop down 2.5 seconds later, one after each other, for a maximum of 6 bolts: The first and then one for each Motor Drive stack (which each come 2.5 seconds after the last bolt). This means that, with some Motor Drive stacks, Electivire can do really good at sectioning off part of the stage with deadly falling thunderbolts, or use it as a primary point to pressure the foe into.

    If the Thunderbolt comes down on top of Electivire, then he will let out a roar and discharge the electricity that enters him as a rather strong hitbox that deals 25%-33% damage and KOs at 96%-76%, which is very strong but, naturally, very specific, and it has punishable lag to it. Naturally Electivire does not gain a Motor Drive stack due to instead discharging the energy as an attack.

    Inside of Electric Terrain, crashing down Thunderbolts will incite static to follow it when it crashes down, sending out small static hitboxes flying around where the thunderbolt falls. This flying static has decent range, a ball about 2/3rds the size of Bowser, and deals multiple hits of 1% that pushes away foes some, with a realistic maximum of around 13% if they get hit close to the middle (and don't DI into it like an idiot).


    Forward Smash: Thunder Wave

    Electivire reaches a palm out, similar to his image at the start of the set, and sends out a wave of electric energy forward, which is about as tall as a 2/3rds charged Charge Shot but is extremely thin. Enemies hit by this don't take all that much damage, 16%-22%, but they do take pretty high hitstun, although it is nowhere near a stun. This move deals absolutely no knockback, and the projectile itself moves rather slow (somewhere between 2/3rds and 3/4ths the speed of Wolf's blaster) while going a Battlefield Platform in distance, so it is a rather lingering threat, and throwing one out and then running behind it is a good approach tool. The fact that this move has long starting lag, however, does make it interruptable and somewhat predictable when doing so, although it has low ending lag to allow follow-ups and chasedowns.

    Enemies who are hit by the Thunder Wave are paralyzed for 5 seconds + 1 second for each stack of Motor Drive that Electivire has acquired. Paralyzes foes move noticably slower, around 2/3rds their normal speed in the air and on the ground, and have their dodges affected, as they will go less distance and will spot dodge slower, although the dodge invincibility frames remain the same. For Electivire, who desires high pressure and can gain speed himself, this is simply an invaluable tool, for helping him deal with dodges to say nothing of the speed. This is especially true when Electivire, if using this as an approach, can usually follow-up with another move and instantly start putting the pressure and hurt on the paralyzed foe.

    Thunder Wave can be angled up or down, with up offering Electivire a chance to jump behind it and use it as a strong and rather rare aerial approach projectile, while down is largely useful on platforms or on ledges against recovering opponents: Firing down a Thunder Wave and then jumping after it is a solid way to approach a gimp if the foe does not recover high.


    Standards

    Jab: Thunderpalm

    Electivire pulls his arm back as electricity crackles around its palm, before jutting it forward as a palm-first arm thrust! This technique has good range due to Electivire's beefy arms and deals 9% damage as a single hit jab. Comparisons to Ganondorf may be drawn, as this move is a touch laggy for a jab, moreso in the starting lag department (ending lag is actually essentially average). This move's knockback is rather low and it tends to drag people just a bit in front of Electivire's palm, making it a rather poor GTFO option, but a pretty nice setup option, and simply an extremely solid damage racker in general.

    Forward Tilt: Thunder Punch

    Electivire rears a fist back as it becomes enveloped with electrical power before performing what is pretty much THE signature move of Electivire...or a smaller version anyway, given Neutral Special: Thunder Punch! This straight and, by default, somewhat downward punch has some good kick to it, dealing 13% damage that KOs at 165% to whomever he hits, which is pretty dang strong. This does come at the cost of being somewhat laggy on startup, but the ending lag is average and it isn't hugely laggy, so it is overall an extremely strong tilt, although the punch has somewhat average range as the downward angle restricts the horizontal coverage: It may be angled up, to be a slightly upwards punch, or down, to be a straight down punch, but up still has restricted horizontal range (it just goes up instead of down now) while down is a straight down punch with almost no horizontal range but it hits in front of Electivire significantly quicker.

    If the A button is held for a split second, a scant few frames, then Electivire will charge this move up a bit more if he has any Motor Drive stacks, causing him to rocket forward at 1.33x his current dash speed (IE it goes faster with Motor Drive charges) while punching, dealing the usual damage and knockback to anyone who is hit during this Battlefield Platform of charge. This is great range for the move, although Electivire should be careful that the increased duration makes it more punishable, The up angled version is unchanged, however angling down is the same as not angling at all when charging forward, since the animation would look really stupid otherwise. This charged version will consume 1 of Electivire's precious Motor Drive stacks, however, so recklessly spamming it is unwise.

    This move deals quite large shieldstun, which is especially notable when the charged version is used, as opponents will be dragged along to the end of Electivire's charge while still in shieldstun, which can potentially lead into a follow-up naturally, and it is a rather obvious thought to drag foes into crashing down Thunder or your Electric Terrain as well: Electivire can also throw out a Shock Wave and then a charged Thunder Punch, regaining his charge while pressuring foes if they shield the Shock Wave, albeit only at specific ranges.

    Speaking of Electric Terrain, when the charged version is used inside of it, electricity will trail behind Electivire's fist as he charges forward and after a brief moment will become a hitbox of its own, dealing half the damage and knockback of the Thunder Punch, although the same hitstun and more importantly shieldstun, which can make this an extremely tricky attack to dodge as this trailing hitbox will catch spot-dodgers, can force away rollers as if they roll into Electivire they risk getting hit by it as he passes them and this move has great shield pressure: Jumping over Electivire and using an aerial, especially since Electivire cannot spam the charged version much due to Motor Drive cost, becomes the most effective defensive option usually.


    Up Tilt: Headbutt

    Electivire leans its head back before jumping up just a touch and headbutting upwards, visually similar to Mario's Up Smash from Smash Brothers 64, except significantly quicker. This attack deals 9% damage to anyone who is hit by it and pops them up lightly, in a pretty good position for follow-ups, although this move has slightly longer than average ending lag, so you might need to damage rack them just a little for IDEAL follow-ups.

    If Electivire has at least one Motor Drive stack, then electricity will spark and fly between Electivire's horns during start-up, and form a current between them during the move itself, which will create a sweetspot that is only a touch larger than the sweetspot on Captain Falcon's knee above Electivire on his horns, which deals great damage and knockback based on the number of Motor Drive stacks that Electivire has acquired for himself. This deals 12%/15%/18%/22%/26% damage based on Motor Drive charge, KOing at 220%/180%/140%/100%/70%, which can make this incredibly strong for a tilt, although much like the Knee of Justice it is pretty hard to hit. Electivire can intentionally sourspot it into a sweetspot against some foes, but never at kO %s (they get hit too far up), and with a limited range: The faster you fall, the less damage % you need to be combo'd into it naturally but the sooner you escape combo percent range, and the headbutt has very little horizontal range except above Electivire so it is hard to get people on the ground combo'd into you.


    Down Tilt: Lightning Jolt

    Electivire raises his arm to the skies and brings it down in a thundering, lightning-filled palm strike, which has decently fast start-up and deals 7% damage, lightly popping foes up and away from Electivire as they get smushed. Electivire's palm will linger on the ground a moment as the lightning flows into the ground, forming a small circuit for a moment, which sends a jolt of lightning forward, visually appearing like Thunder Jolt does on the ground except with a lightning yellow surrounded by an electric blue outline. Contact with this jolt deals only 5% damage, with somewhat good hitstun and pretty light forwards knockback, but it only "hops" once, with the same hopping distance as Pikachu's Thunder Jolt.

    For each stack of Motor Drive that Electivire has acquired, the Lightning Jolt will hop forward an extra time, meaning that at maximum it will make 6 hops of the same hopping length that Thunder Jolt goes, and makes it one of Electivire's few true long range options (Wild Bolt can go long, but suffers many of the same issues that PK thunder does for actual combat), and it doesn't go too fast, Electivire can run with it as he gets more Motor Drive as a pretty slick approach option actually. Electivire can even combine Lightning Jolt with a Thunder Wave to make an extremely potent wall of approach, although this takes good time to do and can be seen coming fairly easy, so it should be noted not to abuse it too much, especially since this down tilt has decently long ending lag to it. Like Thunder Jolt, this will conform to the stage as it goes, so it can be a decent option for people going for the edge or on platforms.


    Dash Attack: Wild Charge

    Electivire's entire body surges with electrical energy, before he makes a mighty leap forwards with a thunderous grunt of effort, slamming anyone who dares get in the way of his 0.8x the size of a BFP leap. Enemies who dare get in the path of the Thunderbolt Pokemon are shocked and slammed for 14% damage that ends up KOing them at 135% or so. This move has somewhat noticable starting lag, but the long ending lag is even more noticable, so try not and whiff this. Electivire's leap is long, but not very tall, only about 3/4ths of a Ganondorf at its apex, and Electivire will not go off of ledges as per normal. This move has somewhat more vertical knockback than horizontal knockback.

    While inside of Electric Terrain, Electivire can cancel this move at any point before he lands via his second jump, which can make this a rather strong and interesting approach item, and at low percentages is a very interesting play with the more vertical knockback of the move, as he can hit the foe and then perform a jump to chase (as they get more damage they get hit further and further away so following up is hard). Electivire can also feint attacks and perform quicker aerials to catch enemies who are trying to counter his attack off guard and for mixups.

    When Electivire hits the ground, electricity will spark out of him if he has any Motor Drive in him, similar to King Dedede's Up Special upon landing, by default going a pittance to both sides, but they do deal 7% damage and flinching knockback, albeit with more than flinching hitstun (it still isn't a great amount but it can at all cover for the ending lag). Each Motor Drive stack increases the range of these sparks, up to 1.25x the range of King Dedede's Up Special stars, and will lightly increase the hitstun, with level 5 Motor Drive allowing him to cover a large portion of his ending lag. Thus, Electivire players would do well to decide if they wish to cancel their lag but leave them in a vulnerable (no second jump after all) aerial position after or take long, punshing ending lag but have hitboxes to protect them as the game goes on.


    Grab Game

    Grab: Electro-Hold

    Electivire reaches his hand forward for what is a rather standard heavyweight grab, slow, but long ranged. Electivire has a pretty sick dash grab and an okay pivot grab, but there isn't much else to say about his actual grabbing.

    Pummel: Thundershock

    Electivire's tail-plugs dig into the foe, shocking them for 3% damage as Electivire forms an electric current. This has the speed of a slow 3% pummel at base, however each stack of Motor Drive makes it a little faster, until it reaches the speed of a somewhat slow 1% pummel.

    Forward Throw: Static

    Electivire surges with electricity as he grips the foe and gives them a forwards, over-the-back throw, the electric charge surging through the foe as Electivire and them form a complete circuit, dealing a total of 11% damage. The knockback is rather mediocre and doesn't KO until around 265%, yet the knockback has just enough awkwardness in the base to make it a somewhat troubling move for setup, generally it is an okay way to gain space at least.

    Foes struck by this move have electricity course and crackle through them for a total of 5 seconds + 1 second for each Motor Drive charge on Electivire, although by default, this doesn't really do anything, as Electivire needs his Giant Thunder Punch and/or Electric Terrain to utilize this, as it is the power of eleftromagnetism. You know, the stuff that moves trains from Tokyo to Osaka? When you've got a fully charged Giant Thunder Punch, or while you charge a Giant Thunder Punch, the magnetism gets drawn to Electivire's charge, causing the foe to statically be pulled towards Electivire at 1/3rd Ganondorf's Dash Speed: Not too hot to handle. While Electivire and the foe are inside of Electric Terrain, the foe is also pulled towards Electivire at 1/3rd Ganondorf's dash speed, and these can stack to pulling the foe towards Electivire at 2/3rds Ganondorf's dash speed, which starts to get a lot spookier. Throw on a Thunder Wave on top of that and the foe will be struggling to avoid engaging on you! This is, of course, a rather lot of setup however, and Thunder Wave is not the fastest move to land.

    Thunderbolts from your Up Smash will also react to this electromagnetism, crashing down on the electrified foe instead of their normal target location if they are within 1/4th of a Battlefield Platform on either side of where it would crash down, increased to half of a Battlefield Platform if inside of Electric Terrain. Lightning Jolts from Down Tilt will follow electrified foes and thus will gain the ability to hop backwards if they have to, and will even begin hopping to nearby platforms (Within half a BFP of where it would hop next) to catch fleeing foes, although this too requires good setup (As the Lightning Jolt does not go far without significant Motor Drive investment). Thus, this is a throw with a ton of potential payoff, but not as much immediate payoff and without much that you DIRECTLY follow with.


    Down Throw: Shock Stomp

    Electivire grabs the foe and gently throws them to the ground, letting out a chuckle as he then excitedly stomps on them, although this deals a rather meager 3% damage: Each stack of Motor Drive adds a little thunder to this stomp, adding 1% per stack, the foe is then sent flying and sliding forward a touch similar to a halfway point between a Falco Down Throw and a King Dedede Down Throw.

    If Electivire has Motor Drive stacks, then the electricity will stick to the foe just a touch, for a brief moment, shorting out the usual grab immunity, allowing Electivire the rare ability to actually perform a chain grab! The chain grab actually can begin at rather high percentages as well, making it a rather reliable way for Electivire to damage rack...but also a rather costly one, as each Shock Stomp costs a Motor Drive stack to perform, and Electivire cannot chain grab without Motor Drive stacks, not to mention losing the many benefits of higher stacks throughout the moveset! Because of this, Electivire may not wish to invest all of his Motor Drive stacks into a chain grab: It can deal a maximum of 30%, sure (8% + 7% + 6% + 5% + 4%), but you give up a good amount of potential benefit that can end up giving Electivire damage that far exceeds 30%. Consider, perhaps, only chain grabbing down to 3 Motor Drive stacks for instance, and still dealing 21% damage, or doing a quick chain grab at low Motor Drive amounts just to try and wrack some free, cheap damage, especially if you have a bit of setup with a Thunderbolt or what have you.


    Up Throw: Heave Ho!

    Electivire grips the foe tighlty and, with a mighty heave, flings them into the air! This deals 8% damage and set upwards knockback of roughly 1.24 Ganondorfs in height of pure vertical knockback (barring DI, naturally). This is Electivire's setup throw, with a fixed, solid knockback that has few 100% follow-ups, but has a lot of ways to pressure aerial foes to begin an assault, the most obvious being Up Throw -> Up Aerial. Raining down Thunderbolts on foes is of course a particularly strong if obvious combo, with them both being purely vertical and all, but a Static charge will particularly help with this by having the Thunderbolts follow enemy DI a lot better given how Thunderbolts + Static work, and Electivire can go with a Wild Bolt option as well for a safer yet less rewarding and easier to dodge follow-up.

    Back Throw: Crackling Toss

    Electivire grabs the foe (by the feet if possible) and begins to spin them around in classic Mario fashion, laughing like lightning cracking in the sky as he does so, lightning making them practically look like a cyclone of energy before Electivire releases the foe and sends them flying for 12% damage, average knockback hat KOs at 215%. Electivire may move slightly to the left or right while doing this, allowing him to bring foes into his crashing Thunderbolts, closer to ledges for edgeguarding, and so on. By default, Electivire can hardly move at all, but each stack of Motor Drive increases the speed in which Electivire moves, and thus the range in which he can move, up to a full Battlefield Platform at maximum drive!

    This matters even more than it seems, because when Electivire starts getting Motor Drive stacks, he can actually alter the damage and knockback of the move by moving or not moving! The more Electivire moves, the more kinetic force gets built up by force of movement, which increases the knockback rather significantly, allowing Electivire to KO straight out at 155% if he moves the full distance: But given that he can move towards the edge of the stage, it has more KO power than that in usage. However, this causes less electricity to be built up, and foes get shocked for less damage, taking only 9% (the cyclone effect will visually get weaker even!). The more Electivire stays in place, the more electricity he'll generate, which will steadily increase the damage of this move, up to a shocking 18%: Yowza! Of course, he's not building up as more kinetic energy this way, and in fact will pick up less as downforce slows the foes down, so the knockback is reduced rather significantly, down to 305% if moving the full distance, which can make this a more high damage, setup oriented throw.

    And, of course, Electivire can choose to not go full distances, and get numbers inbetween that, making this quite a versatile throw indeed!


    Aerials

    Neutral Aerial: Multi-Shock

    Electivire juts an open palm forward and slightly downwards, sparks flying around it for quite some time, the initial jutting out strike dealing 6% damage, while the sparks that fly afterwards deal 4% damage each for a multi-hitting attack that can deal up to 14%, although the knockback is quite pitiful indeed. This gives the effect of this move having rather "dragging" knockback, essentially bringing the foe in the direction Electivire is moving, so it is a pretty solid positioning move, especially with it's rather short starting lag, although the ending lag is slightly higher than average.

    Despite this, the landing lag is quite low, so Electivire can instead use this as an aggressive shorthopping tool, dragging the foe somewhat towards where he wants to go and landing to get an advantageous position. Do note that even with its pathetic knockback, it'll get harder to drag people along as they get up in damage percentage, especially if you are predictable if you wanna drag 'em and thus they can smoothly DI away from you.


    Up Aerial: Drill Punch

    Electivire raises his fist to the sky and makes a leaping, drilling punch upwards, which itself has two hitboxes. The majority of the arm is a rapid hitting hitbox that will deal 2% repeatedly, up to a total of 12%, with the last hit knocking foes up just a touch, while the top of the fist is a sweetspot that instead deals 16% damage and sends foes flying high into the sky with an electric-hit visual effect, KOing at 120%. The start-up on this move is fairly fast, but the ending lag is pretty long as Electivire properly re-orientes himself.

    Electivire will rise up slightly the first time this move is used in the air, allowing him to utilize this as a recovery extender and not get TOTALLY screwed by his easily gimpable PK Thunder recovery, with the distance by default being slightly more than an aerial Yoshi Egg Toss or Mario Cape. Each stack of Motor Drive increases this distance further and eventually, at 5 Motor Drive stacks, Electivire will rise the distance of Marth's Dolphin Slash, making this a true recovery move, although it travels significantly slower than the Dolphin Slash and has less coverage, so it is more gimpable than an already gimpable recovery, especially since the rise only happens once per air trip and is not refreshed by being hit.

    This move is also particularly nice for when people try to gimp you during Wild Bolt, a standard gimping of just taking the projectile hit is usually done from above, sending the foe below, which Electivire can then meet with this move due to Wild Bolt's low ending lag. This actually is more helpful with a less damaged foe, as that makes it easier to sweetspot, because with too much damage the knockback will send them past the sweetspot point and you will hit them with the still-nice-but-not-as-good multi-hitbox. This won't necessarily keep Electivire from dying, but it can spite foes who try to gimp you at least, and put a little fear into foes. This can also be a good way to rise up and meet edgeguarders, since again they'll usually need to go high to stop your Wild Bolt, and you can fly up to meet them with a little sleight of fist.


    Back Aerial: Shock Swing

    Electivire swings his fist behind him, down-to-up style, kind of doing a backwards uppercut to anyone foolish enough to try and sneak up on it from the rear. This is a decently strong hitbox, deals about 13% damage, and sends foes flying backwards-away from Electivire and up with enough force to KO at 185%, which makes this a rare good GTFO move for Electivire. The starting lag on this is average and the ending lag only a touch laggier than average, but the landing lag is fairly bad, so when shorthopping this move it is imperative that you complete it before you land, which usually means starting and committing to it pretty early.

    The added effect of Motor Drive is a strong reason to want to shorthop this move, however, as Electivire's fist with crackle with energy and leave behind a wall of thin, crescent-shaped energy behind himself, as it follows the fist's movement and that is the way it would move. This energy does get slightly thicker with more Motor Drive charges, but even with 5 charges it cannot be described as reaching even average. This only lasts 1/5th of a second with a single Motor Drive , but it will deal 8% damage and lightly knock away foes who are hit by it, with pretty good coverage, and so it solidifies this move as one of Electivire's premiere defensive options, shorthopping away and using this to cover yourself is one of Electivire's only GOOD ways to retreat.


    Forward Aerial: Wild Fist

    Electivire lets out a gutteral, crackling yell as it rears its fist forward and slams it forward, similar to a mix between a Mario Forward Aerial and a Donkey Kong Forward Aerial. The start, when the fist is first flying forward, is a rather weak hitbox that deals 9% damage and doesn't knock foes very far, so you need a bit of distance between you and the foe to get the most out of this attack. Hitting with the meat of the attack, however, deals a much more solid 15% damage, and some pretty good knockback, KOing at around 133%. While pretty laggy on both ends, it has quite good range and coverage, giving it uses primarily in edgeguarding foes who try to recover high.

    Down Aerial: Lightning Stomp

    Electivire puts its arms behind its head as electricity crackles at the ends of its tail plugs and it stomps down HARD, although looking leisurely as he does that. This is a very strong technique that crushes opponents for 24% damage and murders them with knockback, having the same power as the almighty Ganondorf Down Aerial. This move has more similarities to said down aerial in terms of lag, where Electivire's version is slightly laggier on both sides compared to the King of Evil, but it is still quick enough to auto-cancel when shorthopped, just significantly more stringent in timing, and Electivire does not have the Flame Choke to help him set up tech chases naturally.

    When over Electric Terrain, energy will shoot from Electivire's tail plugs through its body, and end up shooting down out of Electivire's feet, creating a thin, Thunderbolt-esque hitbox below Electivire, which deals 11% damage and knocks foes upwards somewhat, and can only hit once. This goes all the way down like Thunder and Thunderbolt, so it can create a veritable wall for foes to get through to recover, which combined with the potent stomp makes this Electivire's premiere way to gimp foes along with the Forward Aerial. Each stack of Motor Drive increases the speed and thickness of the electricity, as the initial speed is extremely slow, with the final speed being a bit slower than a Thunderbolt crashing down, and the thickness being about that of Pikachu's Thunder. Do note that, since this hits the foe upwards, it won't be a perfect gimp if you hit them with the electricity and usually requires Electivire to follow up and finish the gimp off.

    The lightning stays out as long as Electivire is stomping and follows him, so while it is rather brief, Electivire can move it left/right a little by DIng the proper direction, which can come in handy at times.


    Final Smash: Super Effective!

    Electivire has grabbed the Smash Ball and is ready to unleash a killer attack! Electivire begins this combination with a sick Cross Chop, which is pretty short ranged, but deals 20% damage and sends them flying upwards, with the "It's super effective!" message from Pokemon Trainer's Final Smash popping up. Electivire then performs a Fire Punch upwards, striking anyone hit by the Cross Chop for 10% damage that spikes foes as Electivire flicks his fist down with the message changing to "It's SUPER super effective!", Electivire then lands and shoots off like a bolt of lightning to the right and off the screen, reappearing the same height away on the other side of the screen performing an Ice Punch as he flies in which deals 15% and freezes enemies as they are popped up, with the message becoming "It's ULTRA effective!!" as Electivire rushes off once more.

    Finally, Electivire drops from the top blast zone with lightning crackling from his fist for a final Thunder Punch, on top of any foes he hit if he hit any with his previous parts or at the center of the stage if not, dealing 30% damage and KOing people at 90% if hit by the fist and will release a burst of lightning energy around Electivire that deals 15% damage and KOs at 125%. Regardless of what is with, the message will change to "IT'S MEGA EFFECTIVE!!!".

    If Electivire completely whiffs the move at any point, the box will instead say "But it missed...", and if Electivire entirely whiffs the Final Smash, the crowd will sound intensely disappointed. What meanies. Enemies hit by one part of the move are almost assuredly hit by the rest of it.


    Playstyle: Motor Madness
     
    #11 FrozenRoy, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2016
    Munomario777, JOE! and ForwardArrow like this.
  12. Bionichute

    Bionichute
    Expand Collapse
    Smash Apprentice

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    Messages:
    166
    IT IS....

    THE RETURN OF BION'S RANKING MADNESS or whatever

    Yangus
    [​IMG]
    10/10

    Yangus is one of the best sets I’ve read. It’s functionally perfect, is extremely in character, and has a bunch of monsters in it, which is always a plus for me.

    Grunty
    [​IMG]
    9/10
    Gruntilda is portrayed very well here, with enough comedy and crudeness to represent the general attitude of Rare games. The projectile mixing is definitely an interesting concept, and its done very well here.

    Lord Galf
    [​IMG]
    8/10

    Lord Galf is a very enjoyable set in how absolutely insane it can get. The pummel is especially hilarious, and the dog/villager interactions do get pretty in depth.

    Baku the Dream Eater
    [​IMG]
    8/10
    Baku is a really entertaining set. The humorous characterization is a plus, but the projectile manipulation is absolutely fantastic. There isn’t entirely much to complain about here, honestly.

    Allen O'Neil
    [​IMG]
    8/10
    I actually didn’t like this set as much as Baku, if you haven’t noticed by it being directly below it. Sure, the projectile mechanics are mechanically better, but I just found Allen a teensy bit more boring than Baku, mostly due to his character not being as interesting. Also, I’m probably just an idiot, but I still don’t entirely understand how the rocket works. Also also, you have a move that makes oil, and a fire based attack, and no interaction? Seriously?

    Zomom
    [​IMG]
    8/10
    Zomom's a good set, I wrote this ranking like 6 months ago and forgot about it, but it's still probably an 8.

    Matador
    [​IMG]
    8/10
    Hell Portal is basically what makes Matador a great set, otherwise it would just be a fairly generic swordsman set with a buff mechanics. The buffs play well together with everything else, and the Hell Portal’s interesting combo mechanic is stand out. Also, he’s a skellington.

    Kristoff Gavin
    [​IMG]
    8/10
    Kristoff's symbiosis gimmick is unique an interesting, and the way he's characterized as a totally not at all evil guy is honestly really amusing. Only real complaint is that the aerials falter a bit, but what can you do with this kind of character?

    MaloMyotismon
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    Man, this was really close to an 8, it just really needed some slightly better aerials and standards. Also, I’m like, the one person who really loves MaloMyotismon out of complete and utter nostalgia, so that’s why I like it so much.

    Garithos
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    I’ve said multiple times that I really like minion sets, and Garithos is a pretty good one. The characterization of him having zero respect for any of them is really funny, and the interactions aren’t bad either.

    Lickitung
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    Lickitung is a good set, the number of buffs involving the food is staggering, and the amount of detail put into it is equally so. It's just too bad that the set is so hard to read. I'm sure there is something better in here, but I can't seem to wrap my head around it.

    Atlantis
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    It's hard to pinpoint anything about Atlantis, other than it definitely being good and fun. The concepts are strange, it basically being a bizarre minion set, but I suppose that's what makes it fun, huh?

    Goronu
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    I really enjoy the time management stuff, but really, really have to agree with Warlord on the down special being really awful. It has no place in the set and feels forced.

    Artorias
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    Interesting playstyle, and I really love the animations and formatting on it. I feel you probably could have used Sif more, but I get the theme.

    Jecht
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    I have a few minor, personal issues with Jecht, but overall, it is a good set, with some interesting applications of water physics. The Blitzball stuff is also fun.

    Zyra
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    I think I enjoyed Zyra a bit more than The Butcher, but I feel it's also a much more flawed set. Zyra herself is the weakest link, with most of her attacks, by themselves, being uninteresting. The flower minions, however, are great additions, and each one is described well and has a unique interaction. It's good stuff for the most part.

    The Butcher
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    The Butcher is above average, a good opening set, but not a super spectacular one. The Fresh Meat gimmick works well enough, and the general playstyle works, but I personally didn't see much special in it. Still good, though.

    Tutankoopa
    [​IMG]
    7/10
    I actually really like this set, mostly because I enjoy minions and stage control, which is something this guy does both of, even if not super well. It’s also just kind of funny, making fun of the really old Rool set, and the character himself.

    Gluth
    [​IMG]
    6/10
    Gluth is a pretty good set, as someone who likes minion interactions, it does come off lackluster, but it’s still perfectly fine.

    Anti-Mage
    [​IMG]
    6/10
    Anti-Mage has a pretty fun way of playing with shields, which is used well, but the character’s rather limited arsenal does kind of leave it somewhat bland.

    Electivire
    [​IMG]
    6/10
    In general, this set does have a decent amount of meat to it, but it kind of comes off... I dunno, kinda boring. Electivire's mostly a heavyweight punchman with a handful of decent electrical projectiles. The Motor Drive mechanic works, but Electivire not losing the charges kind of wrecks balancing in a few places. Electric Terrain was also kind of pointless, to be honest.

    Garnet
    [​IMG]
    6/10

    I really like Garnet’s specials and smashes, but everything besides those is a bit… boring. Not enough connectivity between those two bits and the rest.

    Gaige
    [​IMG]
    6/10
    I actually like this set! The writing style is similar, but heavily improved from ZerZero, and it’s not jumping around constantly. But, I still don’t particularly like the style, and I think the N Special’s DPS when maxed out is still pretty ridiculous. But, I like the big robot and his interactions.

    Prof. von Kripplespac
    [​IMG]
    6/10
    I have a soft spot for minion interactions, so of course I ranked this set higher than anyone else. It still has problems, like the Alien being very underutilized (Shoulda been a special!) and the aerials just being boring.

    The Great Mighty Poo
    [​IMG]
    6/10
    This set is not poo, but it has problems, like the Neutral Special being all kinds of weirdly worded (Does it stun or not, that’s a big issue) but the interactions with the poo are amusing, and there’s some fun stuff.

    Juzo
    [​IMG]
    5/10
    Not super interesting, but pretty funny in all honesty. The NSpecial is especially humorous, despite how completely broken it is. I also don’t really like how it kills you, but there is a very easy way to resolve that with very minimal issues, so whatever. The weapon switching is also fine.

    Marina
    [​IMG]
    5/10
    I want to like this set a bit more than I do, mostly because apparently projectile manipulation is my jam. Marina does it fine, but she’s still very bland until you get to the aerials. And the Up Smash is just dreadful.

    Dragonslayer Armor
    [​IMG]
    5/10
    Kinda just alright. There’s really nothing wrong with it, and the lightning effects do work well, it’s just there’s just not much to it. Also, not enough Pilgrim Butterflies.

    The Panther King
    [​IMG]
    5/10
    The Panther King has some good aspects, the rage mechanic is actually interesting, and the characterization is well done. However, most of the attacks are a bit too… bland, to make the rest of the set interesting.

    Joe DiMaggio
    [​IMG]
    5/10
    Joe DiMaggio is a very goofy set, mostly due to how normal he is, which makes his variety of baseball bat attacks hilarious. However, the main gimmick of the set, the power boost via getting multiple hits in a row, is very underused, and not nearly brought to attention as much as it should be.

    Excitebiker
    [​IMG]
    5/10
    Just kinda... eh. The heating mechanic is interesting, but not much is done with it. Finding ways to do animations involving the bike is admirable though.

    Melia
    [​IMG]
    5/10
    So, this is definitely the best of this first batch of Xenoblade characters, even if not spectacular. It becomes the best mostly due to it having actual unique concepts that work, and having some a more unique playstyle. But there is a single problem every one of these has. They are very very difficult to read due to the formatting, Melia perhaps being one of the worst in that regard, most descriptions coming off as big blobs of text you have to wade through. Unlike something like Mad Dummy, however, I actually managed to get some enjoyment from the set.

    The Experiment and Little Girl
    [​IMG]
    5/10
    The projectile manipulation is better than Conker’s but there’s some very… questionable moves, like the Bthrow. Also, the typos are off the chart on this one.

    Dr. Eggman
    [​IMG]
    5/10
    This set mostly gets a pass from me due to me being a sucker for Eggman content. It’s still not fantastic, though, there’s odd move placement, but it relatively harmless.

    Tangrowth
    [​IMG]
    4/10
    Ehhh. Tangrowth is honestly kind of just boring to me, nothing particularly bad about it… aside from the Up Smash, which seems very tacky to me considering the entire rest of the set.

    Zer0
    [​IMG]
    4/10
    ZerZero has two major problems. The first is the utterly poor formatting, which makes certain things a lot more hazy than the standard formatting in sets. The second issue is the overload of gimmicks, some of which don’t seem to have a massive part in his playstyle. But I can tell there are at least good ideas in the set.

    Link 2.0
    [​IMG]
    4/10
    While this is a very generic, in-Smash set, it at least does one thing in making it actually feel like a set for Link, and not just a generic sword character

    Roy Koopa
    [​IMG]
    4/10
    It's pretty clear you wanted to make this set a lot better, Froy, but had toe rush it out for opening day instead of actually improving it. It has a really strong start to it, but as it goes the interacts start getting very thin, with some very short descriptions as well.

    Piplup
    [​IMG]
    4/10
    Piplup was kind of just boring to read, honestly. The ice mechanic could have been better used, instead of just being a thing on the Smashes and Grabs, and the entire thing is kind of generic honestly. But it still isn't horrible.

    Papyrus
    [​IMG]
    4/10
    The specials and smashes are alright, but everything after that is… eh. Also, I really dislike Sans Undertale, so him being here is annoying.

    Dunban
    [​IMG]
    4/10
    Dunban is a fast paced, sword based character who focuses around combos. If you know me, you know I think this is one of the most inherently boring concepts for a Smash character. About the only interesting things I got from it are the unique take on the aura concept, and how the Neutral Special literally cannot be used in actual Smash Bros.

    A nub, ack
    [​IMG]
    4/10
    Kinda just generically bad, even with a few decent ideas. Lack of interactions, a few bizarre attacks, and just an awful, awful amount of stun makes it bad.

    Conker
    [​IMG]
    4/10
    There at least interactions in the set, and considering it was made by a newcomer, that’s something. But some of the interactions just don’t make sense, like Franky being able to reflect projectiles for some reason, despite being made of wood.

    Colonel.EXE
    [​IMG]
    3/10

    Definitely… a set. For a guy with a sword.

    It Ain’t Easy Being Cheesy
    [​IMG]
    3/10
    The functionless minions and ridiculous dash attack have already become memes. But in all honesty, I kind of like the head gimmick, I think it works. This set just has a lot of problems.

    Nico Robin
    [​IMG]
    3/10
    Yawn. There isn’t anything offensively bad about Robin, she’s just kind of horrifically boring. I mean that as both the set, and the character by the way. The Neutral Special is bad, the animations are confusing without visual reference, not great.

    Sharla
    [​IMG]
    3/10
    I honestly have no idea what to think about this set, it's just kind of bland. Obviously the support aspect doesn't work wonders, but it's the only thing keeping the set afloat until it crashes during the aerials.

    Pohatu
    [​IMG]
    3/10
    I honestly don't have much to say about Pohatu. He basically doesn't have a playstyle, other than Go Fast, but none of it ties into anything. The real crime with this set is the Down Special, which somehow boosts his already terrible fall speed, as well as his other speed stats, which makes no sense, and basically ruins it.

    Classic Bowser
    [​IMG]
    3/10
    There’s definitely worse things you could do for a first set, and honestly, it is better than Bowser’s actual set.

    Pyrus
    [​IMG]
    3/10
    See Elma. I actually like the oil special, feel like a good set could be made based around that. Also, if you’re making a set for an OC, you need to describe them REALLY well, which you… don’t.

    Elma
    [​IMG]
    3/10
    Eh? It’s very in-Smash… which basically means “boring, but inoffensive.”

    Captain Toad
    [​IMG]
    3/10
    This set is also pretty bad. Like others, I will say that the glove was in general just an awful idea that makes no sense to the character, especially considering that Captain Toad already makes things pop into existence throughout the set. I will, actually, defend Toad being afraid of the piranha plants, since thats in character, but it makes no sense since the hand makes no sense. Honestly, this is ranked above Pepper Maryo because it's just generically bad and weird, not angering.

    The Appetizer
    [​IMG]
    3/10
    I wasn't around when the original Appetizer was posted, so I might not "get the joke" here, but I do know that it sucks.

    Overlord Laharl
    [​IMG]
    2/10
    See Elma, again. It’s definitely a set, alright!

    Magneto
    [​IMG]
    2/10
    C’mon, seriously? This is Magneto we’re talking about, the guy’s been around for years, and you just give him super generic attacks and basically nothing to do? He can’t even move metal objects in this set, how is he supposed to be the Master of Magnet?

    Isaac
    [​IMG]
    2/10
    This is basically just a set for a generic Earth Bender rather than Isaac. There’s no grabs or Uair, so it’s pretty much incomplete. The random, mostly unrelated gifs are hilarious though.

    Sash Lilac
    [​IMG]
    2/10
    This barely escapes being a one by being mostly competent, but horrifically bland. Also, the fact that she doesn’t use her prehensile hair for her grab is truly meme.

    Pepper Maryo
    [​IMG]
    2/10
    See my comment.

    Worm
    [​IMG]
    2/10
    I feel… I feel there’s SOMETHING here. You don’t do anything with it, but the amount of props in the Worms series, combined with possible terraforming properties, could honestly make something good in my opinion.

    Watch out, it’s Sans Undertale!
    [​IMG]
    1/10
    The numbers are all out of whack, the animations are ridiculous and stupid, and every attack is sentence long. You’re gonna have a bad time.

    Isabelle
    [​IMG]
    1/10
    This is like, MYM5 quality here, folks.

    Chibi Robo
    [​IMG]
    1/10
    There’s nothing here, aside from a random, out of place Warcraft 3 video.

    Globox
    [​IMG]
    1/10
    Now, this set is just personally insulting me. Most attacks don’t have damage, and everything is so bare bones. There’s nothing to say about it beyond that.

    Ghost Gang
    [​IMG]
    1/10
    Only barely better than Crash, but only barely. The N Special is utterly useless, basically none of the animations make sense, and the amount of gimping you can easily do to the Ghost Gang is amazing

    Crash of the Titans
    [​IMG]
    1/10
    Tacky props of the highest caliber, and an absolutely pathetic shield, sorry, “sheild”, make this honestly one of the worst sets I’ve read in the contest. Just absolutely disgusting and lazy, I’m fairly certain a few moves are directly taken from Super Smash Bros Crusade as well!

    Geno
    [​IMG]
    1/10
    The formatting is awful, and there's barely any descriptions here. it's not good.

    Slime
    [​IMG]
    0/10
    What

    Psuedo-Voregis
    [​IMG]
    Ten out of ten! TEN OUT OF TEN!
     
    #12 Bionichute, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2016
  13. FrozenRoy

    FrozenRoy
    Expand Collapse
    Smash Ace

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2007
    Messages:
    930
    Location:
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Roy Koopa
    [​IMG]
    “Dad would want a pointless act of violence in his name.”

    Roy Koopa is one of the seven Koopalings, who are Bowser's kids or at least were before Nintendo said they were not. Of course, that was just a Koopaling ploy to show Bowser's army they deserve their respect even outside of being Bowser's kids. Like all of the Koopalings, Roy Koopa is named after a famous musician, Roy Orbison. He is one of the stronger Koopalings, appearing late in Super Mario Brothers 3 and showing off great physical abilities in that and other games, such as his stunning Ground Pounds and wielding a bullet bill blaster with ease with one hand. Roy makes great use of this physical strength and bullet bill blaster in the accompanying set. Personality-wise, he is shown to have a calm style of speech in Japan that leads to a laidback-sounding personality, while he takes on a more sterotypical bully persona in America: This set attempts a fusion of the two (like his 3DS trophy suggests) by using a calm, laidback characterization who isn't afraid to bully people without yelling out or just plain pushing people around...well, not yelling aside from his classic opening roar during his entrance at least!

    Pink is manly.


    Statistics

    Roy might not be as heavy as his dear pop, but he's still a heavyweight through-and-through, weighing in at Ganondorf's weight. Height-wise, he is a bit taller than Luigi with a heavier figure, giving him a decently large hitbox, even if it's nowhere near Bowser's. Roy moves along the ground at Ike's ground speed, so he isn't totally useless in the speed department, but still slow. He has okay traction.

    Aerially, Roy isn't very competent: He has low air control, though not horrible, falls pretty fast and flies through the air at a decent clip. His first jump is actually above average, but his second jump is below average. Roy can wall cling, but he can't do anything else special.


    Specials

    Side Special: Bullet Bill Blaster

    Roy points his blaster straight forward and steadies it as he fires out a Bullet Bill. The Bullet Bill is about the same width of a Samus missile, but is substantially thicker, and travels at a similiar-but-quicker pace than said missiles (when the Samus missiles are smashed). Bullet Bills also travel until they go off-screen or hit their target(or anything else solid), making them quite the effective projectile. When a Bullet Bill hits you, it will explode for 12% damage but surprisingly low knockback, only KOing at 230%. The lag isn't too long on this either, though it's nowhere near as spammable as, say, the space animal lasers.

    If you smash this move, Roy will instead fire out a Missile Bill. Missile Bills are a purplish-red color but otherwise look like Bullet Bills and are slower than a normal Bullet Bill (About 3/4th as fast), but they WILL home in on the foe! The homing is also a bit better than the normal Smash homing that you see. Roy will like to use this to aid the approach of his physical game and keep foes on their toes, but it should be noted that Missile Bills have a timer, just like in the game: After about 4 seconds, they will explode if they have not hit anything. Missile Bills deal slightly less damage than normal Bullet Bills: 10% damage with 250% KO power. The lag remains the same. Combining Bullet Bills and Missile Bills creates an effective way to repel opponent's approaches and create your own.


    Neutral Special: Koopa Troop

    Roy isn't afraid to use his resources as part of Bowser's army, calling for a Koopa Troopa while stomping his foot on the ground once. The Koopa Troopa swiftly appears in front of him, ready to march into battle! Roy may only summon his minions while on the ground.

    How about we get a Koopa Troopa image here for anyone who has never played a single Mario game?

    [​IMG]

    Yeah, there we go. Koopa Troopas are surprisingly resilient creatures, as they have 45 HP, which for a minion is a great deal of health! Koopa Troopas have a very limited array of moves: When a foe is within a Battlefield platform in front of them, they'll rush forward, the front of their body becoming a weak hitbox that deals 4% damage and little knockback, like a dash attack. There is too much knockback for a Koopa Troopa to repeatedly chain the move. The Koopa Troopa will also ocassionally punch or kick in front of it, both of which deal 7% damage with low knockback. The Koopa Troopa also has a hopping headbutt attack that gives him aerial defense, but is quite slow to start up. Still, it deals 12% damage and can even KO at 210%, so not bad.

    It's truely strong attack, however, is when it retreats into it shell and launches itself forward, dealing power on almost par with a smash-thrown Green Shell! That is 20% damage and knockback that can KO at around 95%, which is pretty great. In fact, while the Koopa Troopa is in his shell, he acts exactly like a Green Shell, with the exception of not being able to be infinitely jumped on. This means you can jump on it to stop it, as well. The Koopa Troopa will keep going in his shell until he gets near an edge or after about 3 seconds, after which he will pop out of his shell and return to normal. The Koopa Troopa can also be forced into his shell state by jumping on him, which will put them in it for 5 seconds. Roy can also force them into this by jumping on them. If you throw them off while they are a shell, they'll probably die, as they still will not pop out unless they went into it naturally: Because of this, jumping on a Koopa Troopa and tossing it offstage is an excellent way to bypass their HP. Koopa Troopas will not hurt Roy when in their shell state unless thrown by the foe. Groundshaking moves like DK's Down Special and Roy's own Down Smash will also put them into shell mode.

    Roy frequently uses Koopa Troopa shells as a KO move or to add into his projectiles, but as minions they make decent meatshields and projectile absorbers, although your own Bills will go right through them. Do note that this isn't a lagless move, so you can't just puke out 50 trillion Koopas whenever you please.

    [​IMG]


    If you hold down this input for 1/3 seconds, Roy will continue to stomp, letting out a bit of a roar if released afterwards, a Red Koopa Paratroopa quickly flying into view in front of him. The Koopa Paratroopa is the same size as the Koopa Troopa, but with a red shell and wings. Koopa Paratroopa's will fly in the air with free flight, but will never go above two Ganondorfs above the stage's highest point unless hit that far and will gently fall down until back into that range. Its flight is somewhat slow. The Koopa Paratroopa also has the same amount of HP as a Koopa Troopa and will similiarly, when jumped on, be forced into his shell state, a red shall with wings.

    The Koopa Paratroopa has its own attacks seperate from the Koopa Troopa's. The most common attack is for the Paratroopa to wind up an attack with strong wing flaps before divebombing the foe, descending to where the foe is when they launch the attack before rising up to the same height that the Paratroopa had before: Think of it like a U shape, with the bottom of the U being the opponent. This move has long starting lag, but it deals 14% damage and KOs at 170% with little ending lag, so it is pretty strong. The Paratroopa also has another divebomb-esque attack where, by comparison, the Paratroopa attempts to move above the foe, and if the foe passes below them, they dive straight down: This doesn't have a lot of starting or ending lag, but since the Paratroopa sets itself up first, it is rather easy to see coming. In addition, the Paratroopa doesn't fall THAT fast, so you can dash under it to "trigger" the Paratroopa and dodge it...unless Roy or other minions are pressuring the foe, of course. This move deals 10% and a somewhat weak spike: If you can get the foe offstage while a Paratroopa is pathing to it, though, you can actually get some gimp chances. On the ground, the weak knockback will likely just keep the foe in place. Finally, Paratroopas can perform a quick, flipping kick that deals 8%, actually fairly good upwards knockback (Mostly base: KOs at 240%), and will mostly use this to get space and then run.

    Paratroopa shells, with their wings and all, also function differently than green shells. First off, they deal less damage: 16% with KOing at 110%. Secondly, while the shell will stay on the ground when hit (On that note: If a Paratroopa is right next to the ground, either due to flying aggressively down or trying to divebomb the foe, then like when MK dashes they are considered on the ground and you can pop them into shell form with earthshaking), Paratroopas will actually flap their wings when thrown, shot out or whatnot, giving them additional airtime, depending on how strong they are thrown. A small jab throw will cause them to just flap once and lightly extend the range, a smash throw will cause the Paratroopa to actually rise into the air as it travels its full distance while going quite far, then dive straight down at the end (causing the damage to become a spike), a glide toss will not cause the shell to itself rise but will cause it to flap at a steady just-above-ground angle and go exceptionally far, though it is actually very easy to accidentally kill the Paratroopas with a glide toss unless you're careful.

    Furthermore, while Paratroopa shells will bounce like Koopa Troopa shells, it is hard to bounce them repeatedly as when a Paratroopa shell hits something, it will flutter and fly at a diagonal angle upwards with the same strength of usually bouncing around, which means they are actually good for aerial control as you can "bounce" them into the air and have a nice, long lasting hitbox. Roy can also use this to then jump on the Paratroopa in midflight, ending its ascension but allowing him to "boost" off the Paratroopa, and with luck this can be done for recovery, though since Paratroopas are too stupid to move as platforms for you offstage and Roy can't summon them in midair this isn't a reliable recovery tactic, though he can throw a Paratroopa shell under him and use that for a recovery (but just like green shells, he can only bounce once, so no infiniting). Paratroopa will also, when thrown offstage, try and flap back, though because they cannot do it strongly they can still die if thrown from a good angle or they otherwise get too far from the stage.

    Properly utilizing both kinds of shells is pretty important for Roy.


    Down Special: Miniature Fortress

    Roy retreats into his shell and spins rapidly in place, a look not that dissimiliar from his pop's Whirling Fortress attack, overall being a bit laggier than Bowser's in that regard...must be the cannon. Roy himself can then move back and forth just like Bowser, but stays in his shell for significantly longer: By default, he does so for 2 seconds, but he can stay in his shell for up to a total of 6 seconds by holding down B and may move left and right with the control stick. Unlike Bowser, Roy must build up momentum to reach his full demolishing power, and at the start he moves quick slow to either side, but by gathering momentum he can eventually go about 1.5x the speed of Whirling Fortress. This move, similiar to Bowser having invincibility at the front of Whirling Fortress, has super armor throughout almost all of it's starting lag, so Roy can use this as a psuedo-counter or a defensive move.

    There are two seperate hitboxes on this move: The spikes above Roy and the rest of the shell. The spikes deal a static 15% damage that KOs at 140%, while the sides are a hitbox that at first deal 8% damage and some weak knockback, but gain power with your momentum: At max, it deals 26% and KOs at 90%, making it a very potent move, but you have to work pretty hard for that, likely gaining it over the course of a Battlefield or so of distance. However, while Roy is in his shell form, he himself essentially acts like a Koopa Shell, meaning that getting hit will give him plenty of momentum, though it will mean he also has to wrestle with control when hit: Done properly, you can start a Koopa Shell chain reaction for example to get you boosted to high momentum at the foe quickly, or have a Bullet Bill run into you to get you started. You won't take damage, either, unless it is an enemy attack or something, which will damage you but instead knock you away in a manner similiar to Squirtle's Side Special, though they must not be outprioritized to do so. Roy can even use outer help to boost him upwards, which he normally cannot do in shell form.

    In the air, instead of boosting himself up like his dad, Roy falls to the ground ever quicker, gaining momentum quickly as he plummets to the stage, and in addition his non-spike hitbox becomes a spike: While potentially quite dangerous, you are liable to kill yourself off stage if you stay in it for too long, and you lose a lot of momentum when you hit the ground as you pop off it slightly, though not all. Oh, also, this move has high ending lag regardless of where it is performed.


    Up Special: Rocket Jump

    Roy points the exit muzzle of his Bullet Bill Blaster down, letting out a dry explosion under him that shoots him flying forward and up (Think like a Soldier Rocket Jump or Tristana's Rocket Jump from League of Legends). This attack has multiple hitboxes and a somewhat laggy start-up and ending. The first hitbox is the small explosion itself, which deals 18% damage ands a spike 0.88x times as strong as Ganondorf's down aerial, which actually makes it rather potent as an attack, albeit the lag makes it something undesirable to be used just for that purpose. While Roy is travelling forward and up, his body will be a hitbox that deals 11% damage and decent, but unspectacular, knockback among his jump path. While going down, he deals 13% and a spike that is 0.88x as strong as R.O.B.'s Down Aerial. Finally, when he lands, he is a hitbox that deals 15% and upwards knockback that KOs at 125%.

    Roy goes upwards about 1.75 Ganondorfs and forward 1.75 Battlefield Platforms, but he will go down the same distance as he goes up, which means he doesn't gain quite as much horizontal distance as you'd want: A family trait, perhaps? Once Roy reaches the apex of his Rocket Jump, he can actually cancel it into any aerial he desires, but this comes at the cost of the Rocket Jump's ending lag and the aerials ending lag being combined and increased by 1.2x, making it extremely punishable, but this can help prevent this rather predictable recovery from being edgeguarded and afford some rather nice mixups.


    Smashes

    Forward Smash: Time Bob-Omb

    Roy points his Bullet Bill Blaster forward and blasts a Time Bob-Omb out of it! You'll recognize these buggers from the Koopaling fights in Mario & Luigi...or from playing Sunshine. A Sticky Time Bob-Omb in fact, but details. This Sticky Time Bob-omb travels 1.5-2.25 Battlefield Platforms based on charge, dealing 4% on impact and sticking to whatever it hits first, be it terrain, foe, a Koopa or Paratroopa, even Roy himself if he is sent flying into it during ending lag! On that note, this has rather average starting lag, and the ending lag is also rather average, so it isn't an especially laggy process. This attack may be angled up or down.

    [​IMG]

    The Sticky Time Bob-Omb will remain on the foe for 8-10 seconds based on charge, with incremental scaling like Snake's Up Smash on the time, and will explode on whatever it is attached to after that time, with the time shown on the face as seen above. Once stuck onto something, it won't unstick like a Gooey Bomb, so there's no way to get rid of it or throw it around or anything, though it can naturally be shielded or dodged. When it explodes, it only deals 12%-16% damage, and doesn't KO until 270%-240%, which is rather unimpressive really.

    However, Time Bob-ombs may be attacked, even if they are not stuck to someone, which won't blow it up due to their sturdiness (similar to how they worked in super Mario Sunshine). Instead, attacking the Time Bob-Omb will reduce the time it has to explode by 1 second (Instantly blowing it up if it has only 1 second or less left), while increasing the potency of the damage by 4% and the KO power dramatically, KOing 30% earlier for each time it is hit, up to a maximum of five times, meaning it can do a total of 32%-36% damage that KOs at 120%-90, which is really good when considering the lag, it being a projectile and so on, but is actually really hard to pull off, especially since Roy isn't all that much of a combo character, although almost any character can cause the Time Bob-omb to get powered up this way, so Roy can use his koopas to help him power it up. The only person who cannot hit the Time Bob-omb is whoever it is attached to, including Roy if he gets it stuck him. time Bob-Ombs will damage Roy if he is stuck with one, but will not damage him otherwise.

    Roy can stick this on Koopa shells, naturally, which allows him to throw them around as deadly movable traps which he can power up, and Paratroopas can even send this trap into the sky: If he gets a chain of Koopa shells hitting each other, he can cause the bomb to power up shockingly rapidly, but will also cause it to explode very quickly, a highly rewarding yet telegraphed and risky move. Sticking it onto the ground can afford a more traditional trap as well, of course.

    If Roy Rocket Jumps onto a Time Bob-Omb, it will explode instantly, which can allow Roy surprising power when jumping after a Time Bob-Omb is shot out as an approach (albeit a laggy one), but it especially affords Roy some safety at higher percentages, as getting a Time Bob-Omb at the foe means he can potentially blow it up instantly as a strong anti-edgeguard, especially as the knockback will follow the Up Special's knockback: Which, I will remind you, has two different spiking hitboxes on it.


    Down Smash: Ground Pound

    Roy hops up lightly before crashing into the ground in a huge stomp, causing the very ground to tremble before him: Getting hit by Roy's body is a potent hitbox, dealing 27-35% and KOing upwards at 85%-55%, but because this move has quite long starting lag and the hitbox is very small it is difficult to actually hit with it. The primary hitbox you will likely be hitting with is the DK-esque groundshaking hitbox, which deals 16%-21% damage and some pretty strong pop upwards, still able to KO at 130%-95% with solid range. The ending lag is also fairly long on this attack.

    Something nice about this is that if you hit a Koopa or a Koopa Shell with it, they will enter their shell form while being launched one Ganondorf into the air, while retaining any momentum they may have had, which allows you to easily pop shells upwards to hit enemies, to hop your shells onto platforms above you without having to throw them or to provide safety when just plain trying to crush the enemy with this move. Paratroopa Shells will flutter to the ground lightly, allowing you some good aerial space control.


    Up Smash: Bob-Omb

    Roy smirks confidently as he reaches a clawed hand into his shell, searching for something during charge, before pulling out a Bob-Omb and liting it, tossing it into the air with a cocky pose! This Bob-omb may not have the absurd power of an item Bob-omb, but this doesn't mean it isn't strong, dealing 24%-31% damage and KOing at 105%-80%! Roy will toss the Bob-omb straight up 1-2 Ganondorfs based on charge, getting incremental charge bonuses like Snake's Up smash for the range as well, but he can also angle it left or right during start-up for it to land 1.5 Roy Koopa lengths to either side of Roy, which can be rather important, since just like most Bob-ombs, this can damage Roy himself! Fortunately, while this move has slightly longer than average starting lag, the ending lag is pretty low, so you're unlikely to blow yourself up entirely through blunder.

    The Bob-omb may be picked up like an item while in flight, blowing up after 4.2 seconds if not thrown, which is another weakness to this rather strong move with low lag. Koopas and Paratroopas will automatically pick up the Bob-omb if it is thrown at them, looking panicked for a moment, before throwing it either towards the nearest foe if they are within 1/3rd of a Smart Bomb radius or just straight forward if not, dealing the same damage as the smash attack would. This is also how much damage they will do if thrown by a foe, of course.

    While during his Minature Fortress, Roy becomes immune to his own Bob-ombs: Instead, the knockback they deal will be added to his momentum for the attack, which can be used to boost him quite dramatically, however it is very telegraphed and foes can just hold onto the Bob-omb if they grab it out of the air: Roy can stay in his Miniature Fortress mode long enough to not have it just chucked at him, but it can simply be thrown away, or to blow away some of Roy's koopa shells: It can also be used to send Roy flying in the opposite direction via momentum, which can force Roy out of Miniature Fortress unless he enjoys being KO'd or save the foe from a hard hit. Using the Miniature Fortrss while preparing for a Koopa or especially Paratroopa to throw this at the foe and intercept it is a safer method of doing so, but has more steps that can go wrong.

    Koopas and Paratroopas, with their weaker shells, will not be immune to the Bob-omb's blast whil shelled, taking its damage and being sent flying at high speeds in the Bob-omb's knockback direction, which can make them a very hard to avoid yet powerful hitbox, yet damages the Koopa/Paratroopa and can send them flying off the edge and to their dooms. If a Koopa or Paratroopa wil ldie from the explosion, they will still fly on their knockback path dealing damage, but the shell will be blown out and on fire, leaving behind a trail of fire 3/4ths of a Battlefield Platform behind the shell which deals constant 5% damage, though this basically won't chain past 2 hits, and on a Paratroopa their wings can especially make this a nice aerial conflagration.

    [collapse]If Bowser uses his Whirling Fortress, or any other Koopaling uses a similar attack, it will deal damage to them as normal. If Roy taunts right after, he will point and laugh, shouting "I always knew your shell was weak there, pops/bro/sis!"[/collapse]


    Standards

    Up Tilt: Sucker Punch

    Roy winds up very quickly before sending his fist rocketing up for a sucker uppercut! This is a very quick move, but it lacks the power behind it that most of Roy's moves do, dealing 9% and really average knockback, although the knockback is essentially straight up, which can make for some useful follow-ups: A mid damage Up tilt into an Up Smash is a particularly pressuring combination. The ending lag on this move is also pretty short, and it hits juuust barely in front of Roy as well, so it is rather a staple of his close range combat.

    Koopa shells that are hit by this move are sent flying straight-up while losing 3/4ths of their momentum, so this is a good way to smack people who do a basic shell throw into jump approach, or you can use it to juggle a Koopa shell above you while trying to force an approach. Fairly nice, really.


    Jab: Aggression

    Roy grips his Bullet Bill Blaster and performs a quick swing forward and then, if A is hit again, swings it much more powerfully upwards and forwards, almost looking like he'll lose his grip on it. The first hit, which comes out quite fast, deals 3% damage, but has rather pathetic knockback: If ended on its own, the ending lag is short. The second hit has somewhat long starting lag for a jab, but it deals 10%, and the solid base knockback makes it good for a getaway type of move, though it also has somewhat long ending lag for a jab. The first hit is quite easy to cancel and both hits control Roy's horizontal space quite well, though they don't give him much of any vertical control.

    If A is held, Roy will skip straight to the second hit, which can be beneficial if you can hit with the 2nd hit but their damage is high enough that 1st into 2nd hit won't work. Roy can also tap A during the first hit of the Jab to instantly start the starting lag of his second hit with a cancel, in general Roy should be conscious of when to go for speed or power. The first hit has less reach than the second hit and is rather poor at pure space building, while the second doesn't have the interrupting power (via speed) of the first hit and sets Roy up to be shieldgrabbed if shielded.


    Forward Tilt: Blasta Slamma

    Roy hoists his Bullet Bill Blaster above his head before slamming it down in front of him, which causes it to stand straight up on the ground when slammed, with Roy hoisting it back to his shoulder for some rather long ending lag, though the starting lag is actually about average. The damage this attack does is rather large for damage, 14%, but the knockback is more average, KOing at around 210%. Roy can hold down A for up to a second during this move, which will delay how long Roy leaves the blaster out before picking it up, entering ending lag when A is released.

    So, why is this important? Because while it is slammed down, the Bullet Bill Blaster acts as a wall, which is most important for your Koopa Shells, because that will cause them to bounce off of it, naturally: IF enemies try to smack you around with your own shells, use this to protect yourself! It can also protect you from projetiles and sometimes attacks, though given the long ending lag and inability to move or attack until going through it this is really punishable.

    This move can be angled up/down as most Forward Tilts, which will affect the slanting of the Bullet Bill Blaster: Up will cause the bottom to point forward, Down will cause it to point inwards, with the reverse naturally true for the top. Thus, if up is used, Koopa Shells will be able to ride the Bullet Bill Blaster like a ramp, especially notable for Paratroopa shells that happen to be on the ground. Down will cause the shells to delay for a moment before bounding forward, making it more predictable but allowing Roy more time to react and utilize it. It is up to Roy to use each one as he sees fit.


    Down Tilt: Strong Sweep

    Roy brings his Bullet Bill Blaster to the ground and sweeps it around him, similar to many sweeping Down Smashes, which is slightly laggier than average on start-up, but deals 11% damage and solid knockback with an upwards bent to it that KOs at 195%, though Roy must be wary of the fact that this move has pretty good ending lag, though its still impressive power and coverage on a tilt. The attack is pretty low to the ground, so be careful of enemies just shorthopping this.

    The Bullet Bill Blaster will act as solid for Koopa shells much like Forward Tilt for this move, but since he's spinning the way he is, it will essentially not interrupt the Koopa shell but instead basically just put it on the other side of Roy, a defensive option that allows him to not interrupt any setup much and punish people behind him. Paratroopa shells will begin to fly as if they had bounced off of something.


    Dash Attack: Power Slam

    Roy grabs his Bullet Bill Blaster with both hands and leaps into the air a small amount, bringing it down as a powerful slam that deals 16% damage and KOs at 145%, which is pretty strong given this move has average starting lag, but the ending lag is quite porous and very punishable.

    The little jump at the start is more than just aesthetic, as it is high enough to allow Koopa shells to pass under him along with most other thrown items, which gives him a much more offensive way to answer opponents using his own items against him, and he can also dodge many low hitting attacks with this as well, making it a pretty potent approacher really.


    Grab Game

    Grab: Bully

    Roy Koopa reaches forward with a clawed hand, giving ihm a rather average grab overall really, and he'll flash a wicked grin and get right in the foe's face when grabbed.

    Roy does not need to drop items when grabbing a foe, instead, the standard shield + A is always a grab, so Roy may hold one item and a foe. To drop a weapon, simply hold A instead of tapping it, which will cause Roy to release it with casual disdain. Roy can also press Shield + B to shove items into his Bullet Bill Blaster instead of grabbing: More detail on THAT in the Forward Throw.


    Pummel: Beat Up

    Roy delivers a brutal backhand to the foe, dealing 2% damage at an average rate. If Roy is holding an item, however, he will smack them with it, dealing 3% damage! A nice little boost.

    If Roy is holding a Bob-omb, he can smack it into the foe with this, where it will promptly explode and damage both Roy and his foe. This is a bit of a suicide bombing, obviously, but Roy can use it as a rather guarenteed KO move at the cost of damage and his own knockback or as a last glorious attack in a stock, or just if he thinks he wins damage trades.


    Forward Throw: Smash Brother Blaster

    Roy grips the foe firmly and shoves them into the Bullet Bill Blaster, after which Roy gains control similar to Donkey Kong's Cargo Throw, except that instead of being able to move, it can be aimed like a Rocket Launcher, not being thrown until the A button is hit, after which they are launched in the chosen direction for 10% damage and okay knockback. If Roy is holding an item, then he may tap B to shove the item inside of the Bullet Bill Blaster after the foe, and as long as items are inside of the Bullet Bill Blaster, he may continue to control and fire the Bullet Bill Blaster, which will fire items out like the foe! This continues until either Roy runs out of items or he presses shield or grab to exit the stance.

    Roy can continually grab items and stuff them into his Bullet Bill Blaster as mentioned via his grab, which will stay in his Bullet Bill Blaster until he is KO'd, and will stop any timers on them, be they for expiration or for example on his Time Bob-Omb, and will be shot out in the order that the items were put in, with the foe by default being last. Holding down B allows Roy to shift the items inside of the blaster: Left moves the frontmost item to last, Right moves the last item to the front, up moves the foe up one in the order if they are inside, down moves the foe down one in the order if they are inside, with Roy shaking the Bullet Bill Blaster slightly different each time to achieve the desired result.

    The freedom of this move offers a multitude of options to the observant and the experimental, a common combo would be to launch a foe forward, quickly launch a green shell, and then move the cannon upwards and fire a red shell somewhat above, trying to cut off routes of escape, then pepper with more explosive projectiles, potentially with the foe or shells carrying time bob-ombs. The most obvious of ways to strike the foe is to simply aim straight up, fire them out, and then fire out a bob-omb, but this is a risky move as foes who have time to dodge or, worse yet, grab the bob-omb can easily turn this back on Roy. If Roy has some shells out and bouncing, firing out one of his items to get going before the foe may be the best option. And these are but a few of the many ways that Roy can set this move up, making it a true centerpiece.


    Down Throw: Hop Bomb

    This throw can take multiple forms, based on if Roy has grabbed a foe alone, or if Roy grabbed them with an item, and if so if the item was a shell item or not. Without any items at all, Roy simply jumps into the air a small amount and throws the foe to the ground, which will deal 8% damage and end up with the foe in prone, although this is techable ala Mr. Game & Watch's Down Throw, but the tech window is somewhat tight. Roy will end up at about shorthop distance above the foe and so this will primarily set Roy up for shorthopping pressure situations and Roy lacks the tech chase grab that others may have.

    If Roy is holding a shell item, he will throw it down and jump off of it instead, popping the shell into the air with Roy still holding the foe, before Roy throws the foe down towards the shell for 8% damage and the normalcies of the throw. Foes, instead of needing to tech, will need to air dodge with timing to avoid this (they can air dodge decently quickly out of it), as without doing so they will hit the shell. The shell does not have much momentum to it, green shells will deal 8% damage and pop foes up with somewhat moderate knockback, red Paratroopa shells will deal 6% and pop foes up quite lightly, however Paratroopa shells will also use their wings to flap towards Roy and thus are closer to him and a good deal harder to avoid. While a simple air dodge may avoid damage with timing, a shorter window of air dodging is more key for if the foe wants to really counter attack or avoid Roy using the shell for follow-ups, so that they can snag the shell with their air dodge and potentially throw it at Roy. Foes hit by the shell will go up and so Roy should look for aerial follow-ups if they are hit, while an air dodge puts them to the ground and helpless for a moment and so Roy should consider smacking the shell or a more grounded approach.

    If Roy is holding a non-shell item, then Roy will leap up, throw the foe down as normal, and then throw the item at the foe. This eliminates possible follow-ups if the foe fails to dodge, as they'll be hit by the item, but of course a tech will make them totally avoid the item (and, if it is a hold item, teching in place puts them in prime position to pick it up and use it against Roy). The most obvious use is to simply chuck a bomb at the foe, which is extremely powerful if the foe is showing themselves poor at teching or you really want to pressure them to tech (such as having koopa shells nearby which will guide their tech path), and the tech window is as mentioned hard to use, but it is also one of the more risky uses of a bob-omb as the foe is given an escape from it, it is a high risk, high pressure move.


    Up Throw: Rabblerouse

    Roy grips the foe and slams them rather harshly into the ground, grinding their face/body against it for a moment, before tossing them strongly upwards, a rather fierce move that deals 14% damage and has very high base knockback, but low knockback growth, and so will send foes flying high but only KOs at 215%. This is Roy's most damaging throw by default, although Down Throw and Forward Throw have higher potential, and is Roy's best way to grant himself space, for if he wants to spend some time to make Koopa Troopas or Bullet Bills or what have you, and the foe is sent almost directly vertically upwards and so you can throw Bob-ombs at them with Up Smash if you want to be more aggressive (especially if you get a Paratroopa Shell flying at them!). It's a bit of a swiss army knife throw, essentially.

    Back Throw: Cool Hand Toss

    Roy scoffs as he picks the foe up and tosses them behind him almost effortlessly. This deals a decent amount of damage, 9% damage, and quite average knockback with somewhat low knockout power. By itself, rather uninteresting as a move, but if Roy has an item in his hands as well, he will get a sinister smirk and toss it behind him as well, by default at a path that will collide with the foe. This move's knockback is particularly DIable, and if the foe DIs, then the item will end up flying right past them. However, in turn, Roy can aim the item to be thrown at the foe in the same manner, by moving the control stick of course, and catch their DI.

    Thus, this becomes a game of prediction and DI reading, predicting where the foe will go and what they might want, quickly reading your prediction and then making an appropriate and quick descision.


    Aerials

    Forward Aerial: Blasta Thrusta

    Roy takes his Bullet Bill Blaster and thrusts it forward and somewhat down, giving it much the appearance of a ramp. The initial thrust is the strongest hitbox, dealing 16% damage that KOs at 160%, although this quickly weakens to a hitbox that deals 13% damage and only KOs at 205%. This move has sex kick like properties and can go down to 7% damage with quite light knockback, with this move having a pretty long duration. This move's starting lag is pretty quick, making it fairly strong to pop out if foes get close, but it has long ending lag to go with its duration. It is a strong shorthop approach tool for Roy due to the sexkick properties and long range, although he does need to be aware of getting hard punished on it.

    Somewhat similar to Roy's Forward Tilt, his Bullet Bill Blaster will be solid during this move, allowing it to service as a ramp of sorts, especially when shorthopped, with koopa shells sliding on top of them and flying over Roy's head, and more notably Red Paratroopa shells doing the same if you can catch them in the air, bob-ombs will roll down it like a slope, and so on. Roy will continue to do this while taking the long landing lag of the move, which can sometimes be a blessing, as it can allow Roy to cause the items to fly overhead if he msses up the timing. Timing is rather crucial when using this move like that, after all, because if the move ends too soon, you're liable to send that koopa shell careening into your face. A particularly strong aggro tool is to have a bob-omb coming down and approaching the foe with a shorthopped Forward Aerial, which will drop the bob-omb at them if they, say, shield it or narrowly miss the attack or what have you.


    Up Aerial: Heliblaster

    Roy lifts up his Bullet Bill Blaster above him and begins to spin it, creating a multi-hitbox that deals up to 5 hits of 3% damage, totalling up to 15%, although it is somewhat difficult to hit with all of them, and Roy will rise slightly during this move the first time he uses it in the air: Not only is this a recovery booster, but with the multi-hit nature of the attack, it becomes Roy's primary way to start a scrap in the air, with Roy naturally trying to follow-up either with a Down Aerial (If they try to DI below Roy while he rises) or Neutral Aerial (Otherwise), although all of Roy's aerials are potential followups. The starting lag and the ending lag of this move are both pretty low, facilitating its use as a setup.

    Down Aerial: Blast Bounce

    Roy Koopa takes his Bullet Bill Blaster and points it diagonally downward, releasing an explosive blast from it that sends Roy up and backwards slightly ala a R.O.B. Down Aerial, with no total distance gained vertically (it is a very small loss, but much like ROB DAir can stall a little while waiting to fall) and Roy very slightly back from his previous position. This explosion deals 14% damage and strong upwards knockback, able to KO at 135%, making it a fairly potent vertical finisher since you can get into the air for it. This move's starting lag is average, but it has pretty long ending lag, making it more of a finisher feel.

    Roy's Up Aerial can be a good setup to pressure foes with this. If Roy hits a Koopa Shell with it, it'll fly up and slightly to the side at high speeds and power, thankfully the slight sidebounce will make it miss Roy, but it does add some other potent vertical attacking power to Roy's arsenal.


    Neutral Aerial: Roy Orbitson

    Roy thrusts his Bullet Bill Blaster out in front of himself and then goes for a spin, similar to Pikachu's Neutral Aerial except more heavyweight and slow, with the initial forward thrust dealing 13% damage and moderate knockback and the long spin dealing 10% damage and sending foes flying fairly far away with radial knockback. This move offers Roy quite good body coverage and range to it, but it has somewhat long lag on both ends of the move.

    Koopa shells and other items can be picked up with the Bullet Bill Blaster during this move, where they will move around the blaster fairly naturally, which allows Roy to fling around his shells quite willy-nilly and in many directions, but it's a bit more risky since you can send it flying into your face too.


    Back Aerial: Blaster Smasher

    Roy grips his blaster and juts it out behind him, a pretty quick motion that smacks foes for 11% damage and moderate knockback. This is a fairly fast attack that allows Roy to smack foes away and is one of Roy's better aerial GTFO moves. The lag at the start is small, the ending lag is average, little else to say.

    Final Smash: Airship Army

    Roy slams his Bullet Bill Blaster into the ground and shoots a flare high into the air, which explodes, which has a rapidly changing color similar to the Smash Ball's. This flare does 22% and KOs at 100% if caught in the explosion, but it isn't the main part of this move. For the actual purpose of this was to call upon Roy's Airship, you know, like from SMB3?

    The Koopa army will pour off of the ship onto the field, running around at various speeds and essentially being like the Waddle Dees in King Dedede's Final Smash, except they will sometimes use their powerful shell attack as the minion version. Monty Moles will appear on the stage, hiding in their manholes, and will periodically pop up and throw wrenches at the nearest player, usually if the player is far away, which THWUNK them for 8% damage and little knockback, and they can be hit to force them to stay in their hole for about 2 seconds, and three hits will perma-kill them.

    Every 4 seconds, the airship will fire a potent volley of explosive cannonballs, one of which is aimed at foes (targetting the highest damage foe in multi man brawls) and the other two sailing anywhere on stage (but not off stage). These cannonballs deal 25% damage, KO at 70% and will blow Roy's other Final Smash minions to kingdom come, sending them flying off stage in shell form at maximum damage, which can be extremely potent and chaotic. Monty Moles will always enter their holes and will refuse to come out until the cannonball leaves when they are fired in range to hit a Monty Mole. This Final Smash lasts 12 seconds, meaning 3 volleys of cannonballs, after which Roy returns to the stage. Koopa Troopas not in shell form will disappear, but those in shell form will remain, so Roy sometimes gets a bit of helpful setup at the end here, especially since these will not hurt Roy (they will thrum a light gold to indicate this). Monty Moles will also stay around until hit 3 times.


    Playstyle: Bully Koopa
     
  14. FrozenRoy

    FrozenRoy
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    Smash Ace

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2007
    Messages:
    930
    Location:
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio? The nation turns its lonely eyes to you...
    [​IMG]
    #5, Joe DiMaggio

    What's that you say, Missus Robinson? Joltin' Joe has left and gone away...

    Joe DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio and nicknamed "Joltin' Joe", was an iconic baseball player who played his entire 13 year career with the New York Yankees, winning 3 Most Valuable Player awards and being named an MLB All Star for each year that he played. During his career, the Yankees won nine World Series and only lost one. At the time of his retirement, he was 5th all time in Home Runs and 6th in Slugging Percentage, despite the fact that Yankees Stadium's cavernous right field stole away many of his home runs, possibly more than any player in history (It was built for Babe Ruth, after all), and that he missed some years of playing due to service in World War II. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955, he was named the greatest living MLB player in 1969, he was born in 1914 and died in 1999, and he made his major league debut in 1936, retiring in 1951.

    Despite all of this, Joe DiMaggio is most greatly remember for two things: His legendary 56 game hitting streak, where he safely reached base via hit in 56 straight games, a record which has been considered untouchable and legendary. For reference, second place is a 45 game hitting streak, which happened in the pre-1900s and an era when hitting the ball just a little was far easier, and third is Pete Rose, all time Hits leader, with 44, a full 12 games behind Joltin' Joe. The other is his marriage to the famous Marilyn Monroe, which ended in divorce, yet the divorce seemed to change Joe for the better, as he stopped drinking, gained new interests, and him and Marilyn would come close friends with constant rumors of a remarriage: Joe planned to propose to marry her again only 4 days before her tragic and mysterious suicide. He refused to talk about or exploit the relationship with her after this and remained unmarried until he died. Joe's last words while dying were "I'll finally get to see Marilyn".

    Statistics

    Coming in at 6' 2" and 193 pounds, Joe wasn't a super tall baseball player, but he had some good muscle to him, and so he is a bit shorter and less wide than Marth, but has the weight of Wolf. He was not a blazing baserunner, but he had nimble feet in the outfield and this gives him a speed around Marth with excellent traction.

    Being a normal human, Joe falls faster than average (but not absurdly so), moves fairly fast through the air and has crap aerial control. His first jump is actually quite good, from all his leaps and jumps while fielding, but his second jump is quite poor.

    Mechanic: Hitting Streak

    Joe's most incredible game feat is his miraculous 56 game hitting streak and so it is from it that Joe derives his power. Each time Joe DiMaggio hits the foe with a bat-based or ball-based attack, his hitting streak grows, giving him a power boost to all of the attacks on his bat's sweetspot. Now, the sweetspot is not always the exact same due to different swings, but the general area is, and it is similar to a real life baseball bat, right in the middle of the bat part: The edge/tip and the handle being the sourspots. Likewise, given how each move will treat it a bit differently, I'm afraid I will have to give each power boost in each move proper. Remember that only bat and ball attacks count for this.

    If Joe misses an attack, he will lose 4 stacks from his hitting streak, the equal to the average a baseball hitter gets in any one baseball game. Not all of them, mind, got a little kindness here, but it will still be a progressively bigger lose. If Joe DiMaggio misses, but a foe is intangible, invincible or otherwise dodging/blocking the attack (such as a counter) during the move, he only loses 2 from his hitting streak. Hitting a shield counts as hitting the foe. Non-bat and ball attacks will also not count for missing, though, of course. When Joe DiMaggio hits 25 in a row, the crowd will launch into a normal cheer. When Joe hits 40 and every stack up to 45, foes will have increased anticipation in the background, and will cheer a special cheer when he hits 46, for breaking the hitting streak record. If Joe hits 56 in a row, the maximum his hitting streak can reach, the ctowd will do a SPECIAL special cheer for longer, to let you know you did a good.

    If Joe hits both a ball and a foe with a bat attack, then he will get one to his streak for each, allowing Joe to rack him some more impressively fast hitting streaks. If he hits the ball in a way to hit it into the foe after, then he will of course get a hitting streak from that too.

    Specials

    Neutral Special: Batter Up!

    Joltin' Joe takes out a baseball and tosses it into the air upwards in front of him, reading his bat and makin' a chewing motion with his mouth as he does so, before belting the ball with his bat, though it is more of a line drive swing than a home run swing. The baseball is sent flying forward at about Pit's dash speed, dealing 9% damage and some deeeeecent but slightly low knockback to anyone it hits, but this is merely the base of the baseball, as it gains and loses power based on momentum, loses momentum after time, and may be hit to give it power and momentum based on the potency of the attack. Foes may also hit the baseball this way and the baseball may be out-prioritized by any attack which deals knockback. Once struck, both players become vulnerable to the baseball's attack (even hitters get beaned sometimes, after all!). If two baseballs collide, they will both take the damage, knockback and so on of the other baseball as if it was any attack and get sent flying away.

    Baseballs, at minimum, deal 4% damage and a flinch while travelling at half Ganondorf's dash speed, and at maximum deal 25% damage, KO at 80% and goes a bit faster than Captain Falcon's dash speed, making it very dangerous to foe and Joe alike. When they run out of steam, baseballs will drop to the ground as items which may be picked up, disappearing as fast as a normal item. They may be normal thrown at just a touch faster than minimum, 6% and super light knockback, or smash thrown for the same damage and knockback of this attack. That, by the way, goes 1.3 Battlefield Platforms, minimum speed goes about 1/3rd of a Battlefield Platform, and maximum speed goes 3.5 Battlefield Platforms. Baseballs will bounce off of solid terrain, just like in real life, and so their long range can be abused by bouncing them back into the stage, or platforms, or walls, or what have you. The top of a drop through platforms counts as solid, the bottom does not.

    Perhaps one of the most key things about this move is that each hit Joe performs against a baseball also counts towards your hitting streak (It was, after all, a hitting streak for smackin' baseballs!), This is therefor a primary means of getting your hitting streak going and, of course, each use of this move gets you 1 on your hitting streak, although just sitting there all day and chuckin' out baseballs is hilariously predictable and punishable (just repeatedly hitting them back would do it!). This move has somewhat long starting lag, as Joe DiMaggio must fish the baseball out of his uniform, but the ending lag isn't all that bad.

    Side Special: Home Run Swing

    Joe digs his heels in and narrows his eyes, a single bead of sweat trailing down his face, before ripping forward a single, glorious home run swing! This move has a rather sharp contrast between sourspotting it and sweetspotting it. Sourspotting on the handle deals a mere 6% damage and lightly pops the foe up, while the end of the bat also deals 6%, but sends the foe quite lightly forwards and down. Glancing blows when you go all out won't do you much. Sweetspotting it, however, gives a much slicker reward, 15% damage that KOs at 180%, though this still mostly sits between a tilt and a smash in strength, which is rather disappointing, as the Home Run Swing has pretty long starting lag (gotta time and put all your power behind it, after all) and ending lag (ever see a baseball player try to stop a full force swing? It's hard!).

    The key, of course, lies within Joe's Hitting Streak, which rather greatly increases the potency of the sweetspot of the Home Run Swing, hitting 28 (or halfway to max) on your hitting streak already bumps it up to 28% damage that KOs at 95%, and it only gets better from there, until you hit the maximum of 56 straight, which deals 56% damage and has the KO power of Mr. Game & Watch's Judgement #9...of course, this requires you to get 56 straight hits off of something, and then hit the sweetspot of quite a laggy attack, so don't expect it in a serious match, and temper your ambition towards the more middle numbers. And, of course, the sourspot is completely unchanged on this attack no matter what your hitting streak is, so that'll never cut the mustard.

    Smacking the ball with this similarly follows this logic. A handle sourspot sends it straight up at near minimum power, an edge sourspot spikes it into the ground at near minimum power, but a sweetspot sends it flying forward quite well, at about 13% damage that Kos at 205% by default, until at the maximum of a 56 streak, it breaks the limit of a normal baseball and will be sent flying for 40% that KOs at 60%, making it an incredibly powerful tool...but it will also hit the baseball so hard and far that it will essentially always go off the screen and is, of course, hard to get to, and a bat sweetspot is stronger still (if much harder to pull off).

    Down Special: Bunt

    A bunt is a baseball technique where, instead of swinging and batting at the ball, the hitter instead holds the baseball bat out in front of him and tries to bounce the ball off of it as it is pitched to him, dropping the bat near instantly and hoping to make it to first base before the usually slow hit, rolling ball can be picked up and thrown.

    This Down Special follows a similar principle, as Joe holds out his baseball bat in front of him in preparation. If anything hits him, Joe will bounce it off and slide it away from him, causing projectiles to be deflected from him and foes to be tripped in front of him while Joe himself totally avoids damage. If Joe is in the air, then he will use the animation of taking out the foe's legs to essentially footstool them. This move has quite low ending lag, allowing him to take advantage of tripped opponents, with moderate duration and slightly longer than average starting lag for a counter.

    If a baseball comes at Joe, then Joe will bunt it, which usually will just send the ball on the same path as if it had hit a wall. However, baseballs from quite high up will just end up popped vertically into the sky, while baseballs low to the ground will in fact roll across the ground as a hitbox which is rather hard for both sides to hurt usually. Momentum, damage and so on is retained when the speed and direction is changed this way.

    Bunts are not Joe going for a swing or anything and in baseball they can be pulled back to avoid a strike or so on, which translates in Smash to the fact that Joe does not lose any Streak stacks if this fails to hit a ball or foe, allowing Joe to have a pretty solid defensive option without risk of losing his streak.

    Up Special: Fielder's Choice

    Taking a page from his center field play, Joe leaps into the air with a single hand outstretched, as if reaching out for a high fly ball, which gives it the appearance of a somewhat wonky uppercut. This goes a bit higher than Mario's Up Special, about 1.15x the height, but it doesn't quite cover the same horizontal distance, making it a sort of halfway point between Mario and Luigi's Up Specials. Joe will deal 11% damage and solid upwards knockback to anyone who gets in the way of his ascent.

    If Joe's non-baseball-wielding hand overlaps with a baseball, then he will grab the baseball as it does so unless he has another item on him. He can then either hold onto the baseball, having it picked up as an item as per normal, or he can press A at the apex of the jump to throw the baseball. Joe can throw in any of the 8 directions a Metal Blade can, with the power of the throw depending on the baseball's momentum at the time he grabbed it and when he grabbed it. The closer to the apex that he catches it, the stronger it is, as Joe can more easily transfer his own and the ball's momentum as one. If he catches the baseball at the very apex of the jump, then he can throw the baseball with 1.5x the momentum the baseball had beforehand, being one of Joe's best ways to hardcore boost the momentum of the baseball easily. On the other hand if Joe grabs it at the very start it will have 0.5x, or half, of the momentum of the baseball, creating potentially a very weak baseball...however, if Joe grabs the ledge right after or otherwise is able to land this is not always bad, as the weaker damage and knockback can lead into a combo. Throwing the baseball has some lag to it, but adds very little ending lag to the Up Special, and Joe will stall in the air as he throws the baseball. If Joe wants to get rid of the baseball but does not want the lag, he can laglessly drop the baseball when he could throw it with Z via Z-Drop/Item Drop, which drops the baseball with the minimum momentum of the baseball.

    Joe can grab baseballs that are not owned by anyone or owned by his opponents with this move, however he can only hold one Baseball at once, the range to do so is short, and his Up Special will naturally leave him in helpless after the throw, so this is hardly a good pure defense against baseballs: Bunting is better for that.

    Standards

    Jab: Thwack!

    Joe takes his baseball bat and performs a nice, quick THWACK forwards with it, similar to many character's neutral attacks with the baseball bat, except this attack is very fast. Each hit deals only 3% and almost no knockback, but it has the speed of a fast rapid jab, which makes it a premiere way to build up Joe's hitting streak, albeit a crummy way to gain any space or the like. The fact it is so fast can also mean, if you carelessly tap or hold it, that you end up swinging a bunch with the foe out of range. Don't do that. It'll kill your hitting streak.

    Forward Tilt: Contact Swing

    Joe grips his baseball bat and performs a simple, clean contact swing with it. The sourspots on the bat are still pretty good here, dealing 9% damage and average knockback in a standard direction. The bat sweetspot doesn't add much damage, 12%, but the key difference is the knockback, which at first is the same except for the fact the foe is hit at a more line drive angle, which means very shallow forward, which can be quite difficult to recover (and is very good to hit baseballs at your enemies!). However, Joe's hitting streak will make the line drive stronger and stronger, KOing at 187% at 28 stacks, 156% at the maximum of 56 stacks, and about 200% at 10 stacks, which can potentially make this a pretty strong tilt.

    At all stadiums of the game, however, this is a pretty solid GTFO move, and the sourspot at the end of the bat can give Joe a long reach way to smack foes away without losing too much, and the move is a touch faster than your average Forward Tilt on both ends of lag, so it is pretty nice.

    Down Tilt: Steal Slide

    Joe, from his low crouching position, grinds his legs to the ground and slides forward as if he was at the end of a steal, feet first, which travels him forward a small distance, about 1/4th of a Battlefield Platform, dealing 8% to the first foe he hits and pretty light forwards knockback. The starting lag on this is a touch long, but it is a rather safe move due to the low ending lag, and Joe will want to add it to his arsenal frequently because it does not risk his hitting streak, in addition to the fact that its low knockback and low ending lag make it a very nice setup move.

    Joe slides in cleat-first and this is rather painful for any crouching or tripped foe, dealing an extra 5% damage, although not with any extra knockback, this makes your Down Tilt a particularly strong follow-up to your Down Special (Joe must believe in the First Base Slide theory) and is a useful tool to counter people trying to crouch and crawl under your baseball based assault. Hitting opponents with this hitbox has somewhat different knockback at a low angle, which launches opponents at an angle where they will be forced into a tech chase situation, which Joe can exploit with this move's low ending lag. If he predicts they will miss the tech, he can even go for another Down Tilt, although if the opponent does tech this will never work. The faster they fall, the longer the tech chase situation can be forced.

    Up Tilt: Slap Stick

    Joltin' Joe jolts into the air just a touch, holds his baseball bat up high and then smacks it down, resembling almost more of a tennis move than a baseball one. The sourspots, at the handle and the end, deal 6% damage and upwards knockback, albeit somewhat weak, juggling style knockback, while the sweetspot deals a stronger 10% damage and end up semi-spiking foes down and forwards, bouncing them off the ground lightly if they hit the ground, which being a tilt they likely will. The juggling knockback would be a bit more useful on this move if it wasn't for it being fairly lagy on both ends.

    This is helped by advancing Joe's hitting streak, which will give him a bit more energy and focus, and slowly cut into the lag of this move, every 10 stacks of his hitting streak lowering it by about 1/5th, which is cumulative and counts each other (IE at 20 stacks, it is 1/5th and then 1/5th of the 1/5th'd lag, making each subsequent stack a bit less effective). At the 56 stack maximum, Joe will have halved lag on both ends of this move, making it fairly quick now. The fact that it has two very different knockback angles also makes it a good mixup for baseball hitting.

    Dash Attack: Head First Slide

    Joe DiMaggio goes into a headfirst slide, very low to the ground (Snake-esque), which travels him a decent distance (1/3rd of a Battlefield Platform) at a fast speed, smacking anyone he hits for 14% damage that KOs at 125%, one of Joe's stronger non-bat moves and a primary KO option that doesn't risk your precious hitting streak. While the starting lag on this move is not too bad, the ending lag is quite atrocious and punishable, so don't go spamming this willy nilly. The knockback on this move sends foes flying behind Joe and up ala Ganondorf's Dash Attack. Watch out for people just jumping over you and be aware that Joe's extreme low-to-the-groundness makes it hard to smack baseballs with this move (although this also means he can potentially avoid baseballs flying at him). since Joe is not sliding cleat-first, this does not have the extra damage of Down Tilt.

    Smashes

    Down Smash: Wild Swing

    Joe, with a very tight grip on his bat, lets loose an extremely reckless and wild swing with lots of power behind it...so reckless, in fact, he ends up turning himself 'round and around! Joe ends up spinning around like Link's Up Special, except that instead of being straight horizontal, it moves up and down as he spins, his entire body being like a blur. This has good range to both sides of him and is one of Joe's most consistant moves because it does not worry about sourspotting or sweetspotting: It deals 17%-23.8% damage and KOs at 130%-95% regardless of where on the bat it hits, which gives it great coverage given how it hits all around him. The starting lag on this is also actually pretty fast, duration fairly long, but the ending lag is terribly bad, as Joe will be quite dizzy afterwards (not the status efferct) and need to right himself.

    Baseballs hit into this swinging cyclone are batted away directly at the nearest foe, which is good and bad, good because it can mean a stream of baseballs highly pressuring the foe, bad because it means the projectile's path is very predictable to be hit back and that you can't lead the shot so to speak, so enemies can strafe and stream it quite effectively. Baseballs from above Joe can miss his baseball bat and hit him directly, which will simply damage him as it normally does.

    Joe's hitting streak will make him spin faster, which may appear to be a cosmetic effect, but actually causes him to produce a weak suction effect, pulling foes in at Kirby's pull strength to 3x Kirby's pull strength depending on how much of the streak he has, with 0.25-1 Battlefield Platforms of range (to both sides) and 0.5-1.5 Ganondorfs of vertical range. Foes can battle this suction fairly effectively, but baseballs will twist and turn themselves to meet it and ones with no momentum will get sucked in, so Joe can become a baseball hitting machine and machine gun out nearby, weak baseballs with a lot of strength behind them with some good hit streak stacking.

    Forward Smash: Power Swing

    Joe rips his baseball bat forward in a single, powerful swing of it, with the sweetspot dealing 15%-21% damage that KOs at 120%-90%, and the sourspot dealing half the damage and knockback of the sweetspotted strike, and the move having pretty average lag on both ends for a Forward Smash. This is your pretty basic, strong smash, but the sourspot is pretty bad on it, which is where your hitting streak comes in, in two ways.

    Firstly, every 10 stacks of your hitting streak adds 3% damage and 10% KO power to the move, making a maximum of 30%-36% that KOs at 70%-40%, which is a very potent move, and hitting the 56 streak cap will make this move always come out at full charge, so it is a truly deadly move. Secondly, the sweetspot of this move increases a little in each move to encompass more of the bat, and although each stack is small, it adds up, and at 56 stacks the entire bat will even be a sweetspot, making it simply a clobberin' time move. Since the sourspot is half of the sweetspot, powering up the sweetspot will also power up your sourspot, of course. This hits baseballs in a very standard way and is your go-to for a strong move to hit them for a general hit and direction.

    Up Smash: Break Bat

    Joe grits his teeth in frustration and, gripping the bat so the center is over his knee, crushes and breaks it over his knee as various angry players have done in the past. This sends a cloud of shrapnel into the air above Joe, which is the attack, and deals 13%-18.2% damage that KOs at 140%-100%. While not as powerful as Joe's other moves, it has good upwards range, and is very fast to come out, with slightly long ending lag as Joe throws the useless bat away and catches a bat thrown to him offscreen effortlessly and with a cheesy smile. Good ol' batboys always there to help!

    This counts as a bat based move and as such will advance your hit streak or be penalized if you miss: All of Joe's Smashes are bat based, so they've all got some real risk to 'em if you miss. Each hit streak stack will let Joe break the bat a bit more, sending the shrapnel higher and further: By default, it goes up one Ganondorf and half a Bowser to the sides, but at 28 stacks that is increased by 1.5x and at 56 it is doubled, making it a very potent anti-air indeed.

    Grab Game

    Grab: Fielder's Grip

    Joe simply makes a quick grab forward with his non-baseball bat wielding hand. It has average speed, average range, and is one of the most average grabs you'll ever see, with little special about it.

    Pummel: Yankee Welcome

    Joe knees the foe he's grabbed in the gut, dealing 2% damage, pretty standard speed. This is a non-bat attack, so no getting super cheap, free stacks with just your pummel, capishe?

    Forward Throw: Heart of the Order

    Joltin' Joe kicks the opponent into the air, before planting his foot down as if to make a nice, strong swing, and then proceeds to swing for the fences! The first part deals 3% damage and sets the foe up in front of ol' Joe, and if the foe gets hit by Joe's resulting baseball bat, it is a SMAAAAAAAAAAAASH hit! Most specifically, it deals half of the damage and knockback of your Side Special, meaning a minimum of 7.5% damage...but, of course, get your hitting streak up and it can be so much more than that.

    Now, this might sound nice and easy, but the sweetspot on this is quick short, and the foe can DI, and if the foes does DI? Then you'll hit with the sourspot of the bat, be it handle or edge, which does 5% damage and just enough knockback to keep you from doing any shenanigans with it, making this a rather dreadful throw. Now, Joe can counter this by aimin' himself up or down or takin' a step back or forward with the control stick, but of course, he has to properly predict where the foe will DI. Swinging up when the foe DIs down might lead to you just embarassingly whiffing entirely and getting beat back! A touch of prediction and a dash of DI reading will improve your performance with thos throw drastically.

    Down Throw: New York Beat Down

    Joe grips his bat and smashes it over the foe's back for 2%, then again for 3% as they topple to the ground and finally a much harsher strike for 5% that will end up proning foes, leaving Joe in a Snake Down Throw-esque situation and a prone foe at their feet, with Down Tilt being a natural follow-up, but a Neutral Special is very nice if you expect foes to roll away from you, Forward Tilt is a safe prediction, and so on. You can utilize incoming baseballs as a way to cordon off the stage some, forcing foes to follow your tune more. Each strike of this move counts as a hitting streak strike, so you can also use this early to try and get in some streak, or as a general move to advance your hitting streak.

    If you hit a downed opponent with a Down Tilt and predict their tech-roll, then Joe can potentially follow-up with this throw to put them in prone again, which Joe can then use a Down Tilt on to try and continue the chain, although this requires Ganondorf Side Special levels of prediction and at high damage percentages the Down Tilt fails to launch them anyway. Still, it is a solid and scary damage option for Joe.

    Up Throw: Toss

    Joe DiMaggio simply grabs the foe and throws them up, no fuss, no muss, just 8% damage and light upwards knockback, an extremely setup-y throw for Joe's aerials and projectiles, and it can setup into your Up Tilt too. Being a normal human, the air isn't Joe's forte, so he usually wants to setup a little chain and then get him and/or the foe outta there.

    Back Throw: Backswing

    Joe cracks his baseball bat into the enemy's sides and spins backwards, sending them flying back for 11% damage and moderate damage with almost no scaling to it, in which the foe takes somewhat oddly slow knockback as well (hitstun is taken at the same speed). Joe will begin dashing in the foe's direction automatically if the control stick is held and will turn Joe around regardless, and the foe's knockback angle is quite shallow, so this is Joe's rushdown throw, good for bringing the pressure down on them!

    If there is a ball flying at Joe during the start of this move or as he hits the foe, then he will grab the baseball as he turns around and chuck it at the foe as he beguns his run, allowing Joe an extremely strong approaching tool with proper setup as Joe can follow the baseball and either focus on hitting the foe, hitting the ball to follow the foe's defense, or even go for a two-fer by hitting the ball and the foe at the same time! If the foe can attack quick enough and looks to deflect the ball back, he can try to follow the ball and predict this by using Down Special, countering the ball and hitting the foe with the ball in the process. If he also counters the foe's attack, he will trip the foe, making it impossible to dodge the baseball, while otherwise they may use a low enough lag attack to do so.

    Aerials

    Forward Aerial: Downswing

    Joe raises his baseball bat above his head before slamming it down in front of him, with the sourspots dealing 10% damage that sends the foes at pretty standard, forward angles, but the sweetspot deals 14% damage and is a spike of fair strength, around a DK Forward Aerial level of a spike. While this move has long starting lag, which can make it difficult to time and line up the spike correctly, the ending lag is actually quite short, and spiking a foe close to the ground can end up giving Joe a few followup options to it.

    This move has a scant few IASA frames into further Forward Aerials on it, but with each few hits in his hitting streak, the window of IASA frames grows, until it consists of most of the ending lag, and as this goes on, Joe can use the sweetspot of this attack to bounce the ball back into the ground, and then potentially IASA another hit off, and get a dangerous game of him repeatedly hitting the ball to himself for hitting streak stacks going, which can be a somewhat odd approach tactic, as foes must get close to Joe to keep him from powering up and then he can launch the baseball at them, but of course the baseball will be dangerous to Joe and so it can be turned on him easily, plus it requires timing and not really much attacking the foe, so they get free reign of the battlefield for a while. A risky yet rewarding potentiality.

    Down Aerial: Run Down

    Joe flails his feet wildly below him, as if trying to run quickly in the outfield, dealing many rapid hits of 1.5% damage, totalling 10 hits total or 15% damage, with short ending lag but slightly long starting lag. Joe's glinting cleats are a particular bother to crouching or prone foes with this move, and will in fact deal double damage, enabling Joe to do up to 30% damage with a single move, very Yoshi-esque, although of course Joe must worry about DI, it's not very easy to catch a foe in EVERY hit. It should be noted that this will keep foes crouching or in prone when the Down Aerial ends/they escape, which can help keep Joe in an advantageous situation, moreso with prone. If he very specifically lands during the very, very start of his ending lag, he can autocancel this directly into a Down Tilt for a combo at a good range of percentages if they are in prone, but this requires very specific timing for such an event. This is a strong yet risky follow-up to your Dowo Throw, as it can be interrupted by a getup attack prediction and has bad landing lag.

    Up Aerial: Spinning Swing

    Joe takes his baseball bat and begins to rapidly spin it above his head, causing rapid and multiple hits above himself that total 17% damage in 1%, 2% and 3% chunks, with the last hit being 3% and a light pop, this is done via two 3% hits, three 2% hits and five 1% hits. These hits have varying power but they normally link decent enough, but it is not inescapable, especially if opponents specifically SDI the 3% middle hit or the 2% hits for stronger SDI. Each of these hits will grant Joe a stack of his Hitting Streak if he hits a foe or a baseball, although baseballs will be popped out pretty early due to how hitting them works, but he will only count for a single miss if he fails to hit a foe or ball during the time, and it will not count as a miss if he hit the foe or ball even once. The move comes out rather quickly, but it has poor ending lag, although he can end it early to enter lower landing lag.

    This is Joe's best way to rack up Streak hits if he is careful, as he can potentially catch both an enemy and a baseball in this attack to rack it up twice as fast! In particular, Z-Dropping a normal baseball and then fastfalling past the foe if he can hit them with it can lead him into getting under the foe with the baseball either at the foe's position or above them, so he can use an Up Aerial to catch them between the ball and knock them into it and then back into the Up Aerial's other hits repeatedly, making the move extremely difficult (and in some cases impossible) to DI out of fully, or he can catch the ball and the foe at once to double his Streak hits at the exchange of missing out on various amounts of damage. He can also shorthop this move to hit 2-3 times and land with decently low landing lag and potentially start a combo or just for a little extra streak.

    Neutral Aerial: Joltin' Kick

    Joltin' Joe kicks his leg out, looking like a pre-game stretch really, smacking away anyone nearby for about 12% damage and solid radial knockback, with this move having traditional sexkick properties on a rather long duration, going down to 6% and very little knockback by the end of the move, though it is fortunately a rather quick move on both ends. If Joe wants to approach without risking his hitting streak, this is go-to move for shorthops, as it is for aerial combat as well.

    The sex kick properties can have rather interesting play with the ball here, at the start it can send the ball a solid ways away and let Joe generally kick it around with good power, but the long duration of the hitbox can be protective of Joe from baseballs, and he can hit the ball extremely weakly with the later hits of the hitbox to set the ball up for a stronger strike and thus a stronger projectile.

    Back Aerial: Bat Bash

    Joe performs a single swing of his arm behind him, which deals 5% and pretty low damage, and then a swing of his bat behind him afterwards which deals 11% damage and has decent enough power but is bad at KOing center stage, Koing at 155%, but of course you can use this closer to the edge to KO earlier. Appearance-wise, imagine it kind of like a reverse-Marth NAir. The first hit will usually, but not always, link into the second hit, although it should be noted the second hit has more range than the first. Since the first hit is not a bat attack, it does not affect The Streak. First hit is fast and the ending lag is only okay (slightly longer than average), but there is a noticable delay between the first and second hit, which can sometimes be punished or otherwise annoying.

    The more streak that Joe has, the less time between each strike, and at max the two come out near simultanously. If Joe lands during the first hit of this move, it has almost no landing lag compared to the normal ending lag, which can therefor allow Joe to prepare some combos with the first hit just like Marth and Roy can land during the first hit of theirs. This is also useful because with a turn around BAir, Joe can use this as a shorthop approach which can start a combo or be non-fastfalled for a Streak hit or can fastfall it to land before the second hit comes out and not lose Streak due to the first hit only being a non-bat move. Using it as an edgeguard with the ability to cancel by grabbing the ledge midway through, which Joe can do, saving any second hit miss.

    Final Smash: Joe DiMaggio's 56 Flavors

    Joltin' Joe closes his eyes, the stage dims slightly and the crowd lets out an expectant sigh, before he rips forward a single bat swing! No, not just one, nor is there just one Joe DiMaggio when it hits, as when it does, the foe is hit by many bats, 56 unique versions of Joe DiMaggio's swing overladen on each other like a replay, swung by as many Joe's. Each one may only do 1%, but that adds up to 56% in total, and it will KO at 56% as well (always checking BEFORE the damage Joe did). The audience will cheer for Joe as per a normal cheer if he hits and will have a specific, unique jeer for him if he misses. Better luck next time, Joe Schmo.

    Playstyle: Record Breaker
     
    #14 FrozenRoy, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2016
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  15. Bionichute

    Bionichute
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    Smash Apprentice

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
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    Sproink

    [​IMG]

    Sproink is the second boss of Yo-kai Watch, which you encounter while searching for a pair of lost underwear in the local bathhouse, where it turns out he stole them. Sproink has the strange ability to make hot springs incredibly hot, to the point of exhaustion and dizziness. Sproink has become a very popular Yo-kai for some odd reason, appearing as a catchable Yo-kai in the sequel, and making several appearances in the anime, where he is revealed to be part of the Heat Sect Yo-kai, made up of other heat based Yo-kai like Blazion, Sweltarrier, and Swelton. They even formed a band!

    [​IMG]

    Stats
    Size – 10
    Weight – 12
    Jump – 4
    Ground Speed – 5
    Aerial Movement – 3

    Sproink has a very peculiar mechanic unique to him. Sproink is heavily armored by his fat on every section of his body, minus his exposed stomach. During all of his standard animations, and some of his attacks, Sproink's weak spot is covered by the two buckets he holds. Due to his odd armor, Sproink only takes .75 total damage of an attack, and takes half the total knockback if hit anywhere that isn't his exposed stomach. If his stomach does get hit, Sproink will take 1.25x the damage dealt, and regular knockback.

    Well, all of his standard animations covering his belly is kind of false, since his standing animation has him doing his signature dance, where there are a few frames where the tubs he holds don’t cover his stomach… but, these are so fast that they actually aren’t considered uncovered by the game, meaning you can’t just attack him by perfectly timing an attack while he’s distracted.

    Also of note is that his prone and stunned animations have his belly uncovered, and this does count as being uncovered. Finally, his shield is actually twice as strong as a regular shield, so there’s that.


    Specials:
    Up Special – Water Snout

    Sproink raises his leg, while also revealing his stomach for a moment, and slams it down onto the ground, causing a large water spout to laglessly rise from the ground that Sproink stomped on. The spout is basically a large block with a decorative pig face on the front of it, similar in design to one of those fancy hot springs fountains shaped like lions, and functionally takes up 4 SBBs, in a 2x2 grid, despite not being exactly the same shape. Due to its size, players can stand on the top parts of the spout, with the snout of the pig acting as a slope. The spout can be destroyed as well, taking only 30% damage before falling to bits. Sproink can only have two spouts out at the same time.

    The spout, as it would suggest, spouts a stream of water from its snout, which is fundamentally important to Sproink’s entire playstyle. The water stream goes across the entire stage until it falls off the stage, as it will have no more ground left to travel. If it hits a corner, the water will instead reverse directions, meaning that it will start pushing the opponent in the other direction. If the water gets trapped in a pit, where it has nowhere to escape, well, we’ll get to that later.

    Speaking of pushing, the water stream pushes opponents at a very slow rate, not slow enough to be unnoticeable, but slow enough to not particularly be a problem for the opponent. Sproink himself cannot be pushed by the water streams. However, if a water stream connects to a second water stream going in the same direction, it will double the speed of the current, making it tougher for opponents to travel that specific part of the stage. You cannot have two spouts on top of each other, so there has to be an actual platform above where you placed it if you want to do this. If two streams cross while heading in the opposite directions, they cancel each other out where they meet, causing all water to stop in the small area where they meet, with the effect of two small waves crashing into each other.

    There’s a lot more to this water, but for now we’ll focus on Sproink’s stomach again. His stomach is only revealed during the stomp itself, but the stomp is rather laggy, giving opponents a brief amount of time to attack him. If damage resulting in over 20% (remember, 1.25x multiplier) hits his stomach during this move, it will actually cancel it out and the spout will not be summoned.

    You might be wondering why this move is the Up Special, considering that it doesn’t have any recovering elements to it. Well, if this move is used in the air, it completely changes, as Sproink turns to face the camera, moves his head downwards, and starts blowing steam form his nostrils, enough to actually propel him upwards into the air. Any opponent that is hit by Sproink’s large body while he launches himself will take 18% damage with heavy knockback. While normally this only launches him upward about 2.5 SBBs, there are actually two variables to it.

    The first is that Sproink can actually aim his trajectory, choosing to go directly upwards, diagonally left, or diagonally right. This always results in 2.5 SBBs travelled, however. The second modifier is kind of jumping ahead, but Sproink’s heat level can actually change how far he travels. Going upward to a full 6 SBBs in length, in an absolutely amazing recovery. His heat level also boosts the damage he does, going up to 29% while at full heat. At full heat, the steam will actually be replaced with flames.

    Sproink’s belly doesn’t remain covered during this move, but it can only be hit from below Sproink due to his arms and head blocking it from any other angle. However, this is ridiculously hard to do. As said before, hitting Sproink while in prone acts as hitting his stomach, and that still counts in the air as well. If he gets hit while in prone, whether it be in the air or on the ground, Sproink will instantly revive from it, so make your hit count. In the air, Sproink will gain all control back, except he will be unable to use his Up Special until he touches the ground again


    Neutral Special – Boiling Pig

    Sproink tenses up, with his hands to his stomach, as steam starts to emanate from his body and he turns slightly red. Any opponent who goes near Sproink when he does this will take 0.5% damage every half second they stand next to him, in other words, not exactly an effective offensive attack. However, this is one of Sproink’s other most useful move, as any water that passes by him will start to boil, represented by the water becoming smoother and bubbles popping out of it. The water that passes by Sproink while using this will remain boiled until it falls off the stage, and any opponent who stands in it will take 1% damage for every half second they stand in it, only slightly better than just using it without water.

    There are a few ways to improve this, the most obvious being increasing the stream’s speed with the help of a second stream, which will push opponents back faster, thus racking up more damage. However, the best way is to keep using the attack. For every second you hold the button, Sproink starts to turn redder, and more steam starts to appear off him as well. This can be held for up to 5 seconds, each second counting as a “Level”.

    Level 1 of it was already described above. Level 2 has Sproink gain a more pained expression, and the water will also turn slightly red, and boosts the damage to 1.5 every half second. Level 3 has Sproink start to sweat, and the water turning a solid red, boosting the damage to 3%. Level 4 has Sproink start to obviously be in pain, and the water turns a deep red, and boosts the damage to 4% However, at this point, Sproink himself starts to take damage, 0.5% every fourth of a second he uses the attack.

    Finally, Level 5 has Sproink in incredible pain, and the water starting to resemble lava more than water. This changes things up even more, as the water no longer acts as a water stream, but as a proper hitbox, launching opponents upward for 10% damage. Despite the fact that covering the stage in lava sounds amazing, Sproink will now start taking 1% every fourth of a second, so he now takes 4% damage every second he uses the attack.

    As Sproink uses the attack, his arms will slowly move out of the way of his stomach, with it becoming fully attackable as soon as Level 3 starts. Hitting Sproink’s stomach while in Level 5 is probably a good choice, as it will protect you from his Boiling Squeal attack. Boiling Squeal is Sproink’s super attack, which is activated after stopping a Level 5 boil.

    The Boiling Squeal is very similar to Bowser’s flame breath, as Sproink starts to breathe fire at the ground, but there are a few key differences. The first being that the hitbox of the flame is a straight line, slightly longer than Bowser’s flames as well. The second is that the flames are on a set timer, lasting only 2 seconds, with the flames remaining the same length the entire time. The final difference is that Sproink has complete control over the direction his flames shoot, aiming in any direction just by tilting the control stick in any direction, moving his head around along with it, letting him defend himself from attackers. However, the flame stream still acts similar to Bowser’s flames, as it deals around 7 hits of 3% and then launching any opponent hit by it.

    Sproink can actually move around while holding the button, though his speed slightly decreases after every level, letting him change position in the water stream. If Sproink somehow falls off the stage while in Level 5, simply letting go of the button will cause him to activate his Up Special, as mentioned before.


    Down Special – Pig Dig

    Sproink places the wash tubs he’s holding down, as his pig instincts kick in, as he lifts a large chunk of the ground up, and throws it forward a short distance. The chunk of ground is about 1.5 SBBs wide, 0.5 SBB tall, and travels forward 0.5 SBBs until it hits the ground and crumbles into dirt. Being and incredibly large rock, this thing can cause 24% damage, and can easily KO before 100%. Luckily, this move is incredibly laggy and incredibly slow, and with its incredibly short travel distance it makes it easy to avoid, despite the size.

    Due to the size and laggy nature of the attack, Sproink requires both hands to perform it, leaving his belly open for attack. His belly being attacked during this will cause Sproink to drop the rock on top of his head, causing 7% damage to himself, and leaving him stunned, and thus open to more attacks. Luckily, this can be worthwhile, as the result of this can play an important role in Sproink’s attack.

    Due to lifting a chunk of the ground out, Sproink has created a large pit in a type of Warlord style terraforming tactic. The pit is exactly the same size as the rock that was lifted, 1.5 SBBs wide, 0.5 SBB high. This, in basic function, can act as a pool, as when water travels into it, it will start to fill up, until it reaches the near the top of the pit. Due to how the pit is shaped, it will not overflow, and as long as there is a flow of water, it will remain full.

    When any temperature of water travels into the pit, it will remain that temperature. Forever. Basically, what this allows you to do is create pits of lava on the stage. Combine this with throws and you have some good zoning opportunities. One of the best choices is to fill a pit with water, and then heat it up from the inside, creating a hot bath to ward off opponents.
    If the water stops coming in, however, the pool will slowly drain, and, eventually, the pit will turn back into normal ground, both of which combined can take 10 seconds.


    Side Special – Drop the Soap

    Sproink drops one of his wash tubs, and pulls out a bar of soap from… somewhere, and then throws it. The soap will just kinda skid on the ground a short distance and stop, disappearing. Well, that was disappointing. Doesn’t even do any damage, either. The soap is about the size of Fox’s laser, just slightly taller.

    That’s because you need to use it on water in order for it to be effective. When it travels on the water, it will skid across it incredibly quickly, traveling across the water at Captain Falcon’s dash speed. This acts as an odd ground based projectile. It can only travel about 6 SBBs in distance, as it gets smaller and smaller as it travels, which is a large distance traveled in an incredibly fast time.

    If the soap hits an opponent, they will trip, causing 10% damage and making the soap disappear. This trip actually lasts longer than most trips, about 1.5x longer than a standard Brawl trip. This is useful, as it leaves the opponent open for an extra hot burst of water, or a drop into a water pit.

    However, like the Down Special, due to this requiring a hand, Sproink leaves his stomach open for a bit both before and after the throw. However, unlike some other moves, where hitting his stomach will cancel out the attack, Sproink will still throw the soap, thanks to 20% of super armor. The soap actually won’t hit the opponent, due to the soap only becoming a hitbox after it hits the ground.


    Standards
    Down Tilt – Bucket Scoop

    Sproink lowers the buckets in his hands to his sides, and then quickly thrusts them upwards, in what might seem like a normal attack at first. The scoop deals around 13% damage, with fairly weak upwards knockback, in what might seem like a weak move would you compare it to the rest of his set. This is actually one of Sproink’s fastest attacks, with only a few frames revealing his stomach. This works out, since this plays into one of Sproink’s main methods of attack.

    If Sproink uses this attack in a water stream, the tubs he holds will fill up with water, which slightly changes his animations, as he moves a bit more carefully, and instead of the tub being held in front of his stomach on its side, it is now held in a normal position, as he doesn’t want to spill the water. He also stops doing his dance, as he now just holds the second bucket slightly above his head.

    This water can be incredibly helpful for Sproink, as the temperature of the water stays the same when he scoops it up. This can play into most of his grabs, standards, aerials, and smashes. For example, using this move again after scooping up some water will, despite being the same animation, the water will instead fly out of the tubs, as an arcing pattern, going just slightly above Sproink’s own head in height, and travelling forward about one SBB. Despite the heat of the water remaining the same, each different attack with this ability has different set damage for each level of water heat.

    For example, no heat causes no damage, like usual, but pushes the opponent back better than a normal water stream. However, Level 1 heat now causes 7% damage, Level 2 causes 9%, Level 3 causes 11%, Level 4 causes 14%, and finally, Level 5 causes 17% damage. This is actually an example of one of the more average strength water attacks. Levels 3 to 5 have different knockback effects than the first two levels as well, each getting increasingly better, until Level 5 has some actually really great knockback.


    Forward Tilt – Piggy Push

    Sproink rather laggily rears his arms backwards, gripping the bottom of the tubs with his palms, and then pushes forwards, tubs first. Due to Sproink’s massive arms, this has surprisingly good range for an FTilt. It causes a fairly good 18% damage to make up for the laggy start, but doesn’t have that good knockback, as, since it acts as a shove, only pushes the opponent backwards a little bit. This can, however, be used to knock opponents into a hot tub, and you just need to shove the opponent in. Like most FTilts, it can be aimed forwards, upwards, or downwards.

    This move, like most of Sproink’s non Special moves, has the ability to throw any water he’s carrying. This specific move can have some of the best uses, thanks to the ability to aim the attack. If aimed forward, it has a very simple distance, mostly just going forward a bit before falling to the ground. Upwards, it has a very similar arc to the DTilt’s arc.

    Downwards, if used normally, will just fall into the ground, doing nothing, but on a ledge, it can be made into Sproink’s only real edgeguarding move.

    Damage rate-wise, this is actually a weaker move to make up for its multiple launching angles. Level 1 causes 4% damage, Level 2 causes 6%, Level 3 causes 8%, Level 4 causes 11%, and level 5 causes 13% damage. Due to how the attack requires both hands, Sproink’s stomach is revealed, and considering how laggy the attack is, it’s entirely possible for a fast opponent to get a good hit in. Hitting his stomach during this animation will not cause Sproink to stop the attack however.


    Dash Attack – Water Slide

    This is one of the handful of moves that Sproink has that does not interact with carried water, which Sproink will instantly lose if he uses this move, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t interact with the water. Using this will cause Sproink to jump during his fairly slow dash, where he proceeds to turn and land on his stomach, which creates a weak hitbox that deals a rather pitiful 7% damage for a character of his girth. During his leap, Sproink’s belly is revealed for a few frames, just enough for an opponent to hit it, which will cancel the animation. Using the attack on normal ground will cause Sproink to flop onto his stomach, and then laggily get up, revealing his stomach for another handful of frames.

    Using this on water, however, makes this move much more useful, as Sproink will start sliding on the water, at 1.5x his dash speed, turning into a moving hitbox around the size of 1 SBB that deals 13% damage and travels forward about 4 SBB (Or until just near a ledge) before Sproink gets up in a laggy, but not nearly as laggy as the version on normal ground, animation. Using this attack on a sped up water stream will enhance it even more, as Sproink now slides forward at twice his dash speed, and deals 16% damage to whoever he hits. He still travels the same distance, however.

    Of note, despite Sproink losing any water he carries, it visibly splashes out, the getting up animation will fill up the tubs with water as well, allowing it to function as a secondary way to pick up water, as well as not being intrusive to his playstyle by making the water disappear. If used on normal ground, however, the water will be lost, since he’ll have no water to pick up.


    Up Tilt – Swiney Swipe

    Sproink swipes overhead with his bucket, in a very simple motion. However, this attack has a lot more applied to it than on the surface. Used normally, this is a decent anti-aerial attack, as Sproink reaches above him fairly high, and in a very fast motion, also dealing 12% damage and some decent upwards knockback with each hit. Due to only needing one arm for this attack, Sproink’s stomach is never revealed during it, making it even better. Its hitbox also allows it to hit characters around Mario’s height into the air even when on the ground. It does not, however, have that much KO potential to it.

    Normally, this attack does not pick up water during its animation, but if Sproink is standing under a waterfall, created when his water goes off a platform, and uses the attack, he will get a bucket full of water to help in his cause. Speaking of which, the water projectile for this move has an interesting hitbox to it, as, due to the animation, Sproink will throw the water behind him, traveling backwards a bit before hitting the ground.

    Level 1 causes 5% damage, Level 2 causes 7% damage, Level 3 causes 10% damage, Level 4 causes 12% damage, and Level 5 causes 16% damage. This can function as a fun surprise attack, but after a bit it can be easily read. Its properties can be used for a fairly decent anti-recovery move against opponents, especially at Level 5.


    Jab – Pig Punch

    Sproink rears his arm back, and then thrusts it forward, in a very laggy, simple punching animation. This move in general is very simple, as it has no special interactions other than being a very powerful jab, doing 10% damage and some good knockback. However, his stomach is revealed for the very laggy startup, and the very laggy ending, so only use this move when you’re very sure it’s going to hit.


    Smashes
    Forward Smash – Tub Toss

    During the charge, Sproink rears back, and then thrusts his arms forward, throwing the tubs out of his hands, turning them into projectiles. The tubs have a set distance, going forward 2 SBBs before hitting the ground and exploding. Like any projectile, it hitting something will prematurely explode. The explosion itself is a massively powerful hitbox, causing 19%-37% damage depending on the charge, and is easily capable of KOing at under 100%, and it can be enhanced even more with the help of hot water.

    The hot water, instead of creating a projectile hitbox, will actually add to the strength of the tubs, Level 1 adding 3%, Level 2 adding 6%, Level 3 adding 12%, level 4 adding 15%, and Level 5 adding 18%. Each level also adds in extra knockback, easily being able to KO at around 50% on all but the heaviest characters. Of course, this has big downsides, as each level also adds a bit of start up lag to the move, which, of course, reveals Sproink's stomach. Hitting it with a strong enough attacks will cancel the move as well.

    But that's not the only downside. You see, after using the move, it will cause Sproink to lose his buckets, leaving him vulnerable to basically every attack on his stomach for a good 3 seconds. It's not all bad for Sproink, as he can still use all of his attacks, aside from his FSmash, with the hitboxes replaced with Sproink generically punching instead of swinging his tubs. This basically just removes the water interactions for a bit.

    The best way to use this move is to prepare it before hand. A well timed use of the tuns can easily lead to multiple KOs, but die to the lag, it can end in major problems for Sproink.


    Up Smash - Trapped in a Barrel

    Similar to DK's USmash, Sproink slams his tubs together in a strong clapping motion, with surprisingly little start up lag, but a bit of ending lag. Normally, the attack acts as a strong Up Smash, with basically no interactions with the water, aside from the start of the animation causing the tubs to pick up some, and deals a strong 18%-27% damage depending on the charge, with strong upwards knockback.

    That is, of course, if you don't hit the move's sweet spot, being the very center of where the buckets meet. If an opponent is hit in the sweet spot, Sproink will activate a command grab, as he traps the opponent inbetween his two tubs. This acts mostly like DK's forward throw, as Sproink can now move around with the opponent stuck in his tubs. Like DK, Sproink does not have access to his regular attacks, but using a Smash during the grab will cause Sproink to do a generic throw in any direction, which has decent knockback, and always does 10% damage.

    That's not all, however. With water in the tubs, the opponent will gradually take damage for as long as they stay in the barrel. The amount of damage they take depends on the heat level of the water. Level 1 causes 1% every quarter second, Level 2 causes 1.5%, Level 3 causes 2%, Level 4 causes 2.5%, and Level 5 causes 3%. Luckily for the opponent, this move only takes 1.5x more mashing than a normal grab, meaning they can break free, but not without some damage.


    Down Smash - Hogwash Wave

    Sproink, in another move similar to DK, raises both of his arms above his head, and then slams them down into the ground. Normally, the attack deals 19%-28% damage, with good downwards knockback. Lag wise, the attack has a bit of start up lag, and a bit of ending lag, making the fact that this requires both hands, thus revealing Sproink's stomach, a bit of a problem. The attack in general resembles DK's DSmash a lot, basically having the same hitbox and maybe a bit more range than DK. It doesn't even have a water projectile to it. Well, kind of.

    You see, when you use this move in a stream of water, the slam will create two waves of water in both directions, which, depending on the heat level, can cause damage. The waves themselves, even without the heat damage, can decently push the opponent, but with heat it adds a fairly weak hitbox, which is strong enough to only get one hit on the opponent before the waves disappear.

    The waves go up to Sproink's midsection in height, and are about as wide as a 1 and a half Kirbys. Like all other water based hitboxes in this set, the damage is changed depending on the heat level. Level 1 causes 7%, Level 2 causes 10%, Level 3 causes 13%, Level 4 causes 15%, and Level 5 causes 19% damage. The waves travel a very short distance, about half a SBB, before going back into the water.


    Aerials
    Neutral Aerial - Spinning Piggy

    Sproink, in the air, performs an attack similar to Wario's NAir, as he spins around with his arms and legs stretched out. Due to Sproink's much larger size, this gives him a lot more range than Wario's spin. This move is very fast, one of the fastest in Sproink's entire set, with barely any lag at all, beginning or end-wise. This does, however, make it fairly weak, as it only causes 14% damage on direct hit, making it weak not only for Sproink, but for aerials in general. Since Sproink uses all of his limbs, that means that his stomach will be revealed, and being hit with an upward attack can potentially knock Sproink into prone if it's strong enough.

    This move, being an aerial, does not have any interaction with the water on the ground, aside from it having the water projectile interaction. This time, the water will form a large ring around Sproink, which will move outwards a bit, and then downwards a bit, before disappearing, taking about less than half a second, making it also very quick. It causes 5% at Level 1, 7% at Level 2, 9% at Level 3, 12% at Level 4, and 15% at Level 5, with knockback also increasing with each level as well.


    Down Aerial - Cannonball

    In a fairly standard stall and fall move, Sproink curls up in a cannonball position and starts plummeting towards the ground very quickly. The move is fast, even for a heavyweight stall and fall, and like most, causes a meteor smash effect if it hits from directly above. Due to Sproink's pose, this attack is one of the few that actually covers up his stomach, but due to the speed of the move, it would basically be impossible to actually hit his stomach while he falls. The attack still causes a very good 17% damage when it hits, but you might not actually WANT to hit the opponent with it most of the time.

    Like the DSmash, if this attack hits water, it will create two waves on both sides of Sproink, with the waves basically acting functionally the same, going up to half of Sproink's height, being 1.5 Kirbys wide, and traveling a very short distance before disappearing. The only true difference is damage percents, as the waves cause slightly less damage than the DSmash when heated up. Level 1 causes 6% damage, Level 2 causes 8%, Level 3 causes 9%, Level 4 causes 12%, and Level 5 causes 15%.


    Forward Aerial - Watered Down

    Sproink raises his arms above his head, and then swings them downwards, in another move slightly similar to Donkey Kong. The move, like DK's FAir, has heavy beginning and ending lag to it, but unlike DK's FAir, it does not have a meteor smash effect to it, though it does have a bit of a forwards-downward knockback to it. It still has good knockback to it, and causes a good 15% damage, but the lag can hinder it's good qualities, as Sproink's stomach is revealed during the start up animation, meaning it can be hit, and Sproink can potentially be knocked out of the attack.

    Like most attacks, this also creates a water projectile. This projectile fires at a downward-diagonal angle, with infinite range, and about 2/3rds of Sonic's run speed. The projectile is fairly weak, and doesn't do much knockback, even at the highest heat level, mostly due to it being able to function as a second hit for the FAir. Opponents hit by the attack early will be knocked right into the water projectile's path. Level 1 causes 4% damage, Level 2 causes 6%, Level 3 causes 7%, Level 4 causes 9%, and Level 5 causes 12%. The main use of this move comes down to being one of Sproink's very few decently ranged Aerials, even if not that powerful.


    Back Air - Swine Swivel

    Sproink stretches his arms out in front of him, and, in a fairly laggy, but powerful, motion, swings them behind him. This is a fairly powerful attack, and despite the opening lag, it does come out relatively quickly. The power of this powerful move results in 20% damage and some heavy knockback, but it can be a pain to hit correctly with due to the start up lag. The attack also reveals Sproink's stomach, like most attacks, leaving him fairly open to attacks at the start of the animation.

    Like most moves, this attack also creates a water projectile, this one being more of a close ranged burst, with knockback much better than any of the other water projectiles in the set. The timing of the move can very easily lead to the main attack leading directly into the projectile, meaning that it still has fairly low damage to make up for it. Level 1 heat causes 5% damage, Level 2 causes 7%, Level 3 causes 9%, Level 4 causes 10%, and Level 5 causes 13%.


    Up Air - Hog Headbutt

    Sproink leans back, and the thrusts his head upwards in a motion similar to DK's UAir, all the while covering his stomach with his arms, meaning that this is a move with no water. The attack is one of Sproink's simplest, mostly just being a very useful upward hitbox with minor start up lag, but is decently quick when the hitbox activates. As a powerful attack, it causes a decent 22% damage with good upwards knockback if it hits.


    Grab Game
    Grab & Pummel

    Sproink has a very odd grab, similar in animation to his Up Smash, as he slams his tubs together to trap the opponent inside. This actually activates an effect similar to the Up smash's command grab, as it gradually causes damage depending on the heat level of the water carried inside of the bucket, with the same damage ratios, but without the ability to move around after catching the opponent. The pummel has Sproink shake the tubs, causing 5% damage to the opponent, in a fairly long animation.

    Using the grab when not in range of an opponent, approximately 1.5 SBBs away from Sproink counting as out of ranger, and standing in water, Sproink will actually instead use his grab to do a simple scooping motion, filling one of his tubs with water in a quick motion, but without the benefit of an actual attack to it.


    Forward Throw - On a Roll

    Sproink squeezes his tubs together, and the lifts them above his head, and throws them much like how DK does a barrel, and surprise, the two tubs combined actually do roll across the ground as a slightly smaller barrel item, moving at around the same speed. This does, however, have limits, unlike the might barrel. After traveling 2 SBBs, the barrel will explode, freeing the opponent, and leaving Sproink vulnerable for about half as long as FSmash's vulnerability, the same of which can basically be said for every other throw here. It also can't travel in the air well, as it will only spend half a second in the air before it explodes, freeing the opponent, with their full set of jumps as well. No barrel throwing KOs for you, pig man.

    Also of note is that the barrel, and any rolling items in fact, will move much faster than normal.

    Back to the rolling barrel. So, when the barrel hits an opponent, it will explode, causing a varied amount of damage, depending on the heat level, to both the grabbed opponent, and the opponent it hits. However, in order to make this a not useless throw, no water will still cause damage. No water causes 12% damage, Level 1 causes 13%, Level 2 causes 15%, Level 3 causes 16%, Level 4 causes 17%, and Level 5 causes 18%. This move is risky, but having a throw that can damage two opponents, and deal some pretty decent knockback as well can be very helpful, especially when the speed is boosted thanks to the water currents.


    Down Throw - Takin' a Break

    Sproink, in an incredibly laggy animation, slowly puts the barrel down, pulls out a bottle of milk, drinks from it, and then suddenly jumps and squashes the trapped opponent with his bottom. This is an incredibly long move, taking around 4 seconds to fully complete, made even worse by the fact that Sproink gains 40% extra super armor during it, meaning he's immovable by any other opponent during it. The move does deliver an incredible 18% damage, with incredibly high knockback, making this by far one of Sproink's best KO moves. Drinking the milk also heals a paltry 1% for Sproink.

    You might think that this is a very unfair move, but it isn't. You see, during the attack's animation you can still mash your way out of the barrel, at around 1.5 times the usual grab strength. It takes a bit of mashing, but the reward will be worth it, as freeing yourself from the bucket will surprise the pig, causing him to fall into prone, letting you give some more damage to his weak point.

    An amusing note is that, if used on a water current, the barrel will roll off, turning into the FThrow almost automatically, confusing Sproink in the process. This will also leave Sproink without his tubs for a few seconds.


    Back Throw - Barrel Falls

    Much like the FThrow, this move will have Sproink squeeze his tubs together, turn around, lift the barrel above his head, and then throw it, this time in an arching pattern instead of straight towards the ground. This is where the similarities end, as this move basically acts completely different. The barrel will explode as soon as it hits the ground, or an opponent in the air, dealing its damage to the opponent trapped inside, plus damage to any opponents it hits. The throw animation is still laggy, and still reveals Sproink's stomach, however.

    This has a few unique balancing applications. The throw will always make the barrel travel 2.5 SBBs forward before it hits the ground, even altering its trajectory in order to match up with the distance. Since the distance is good, and the speed of the move is very quick, you might be tempted to throw the opponent right off the stage, but if the barrel goes under the base platform of the stage, it will instantly explode, leaving the opponent unharmed, and giving them all of their jumps.

    Damage ratio time. Like the FThrow, it still does damage if there is no water inside of the barrel, in order to not make it useless as a throw. No water causes 11% damage, Level 1 causes 13%, Level 2 causes 14%, Level 3 causes 15%, Level 4 causes 16%, and Level 5 causes 18%.


    Up Throw - Skull Cracker

    Sproink lifts the barrel above his head, and then slams it with his forehead once it comes back down, launching the opponent off. This is Sproink's most basic throw, as it is only an okay KO move, deals the second highest amount of damage of his throws, 20%, and has some fairly good knockback to it as well, and it doesn't have variable damage. Just a pig slamming his head against a barrel, like the good old days.


    Final Smash
    Hoggles' Broth

    Sproink's got the Smash Ball! Using it will cause a large cauldron full of stew to appear in front of Sproink, which he happily gulps down, like an absolute pig. This causes Sproink to turn entirely black, much like his bonus boss relative, Hoggles, and grow to around half the size of Giga Bowser, but he becomes just as powerful as well. Sproink loses some speed and jump height during this, but makes up for it in size and power, as all of Sproink's attacks have now been replaced mostly with generic sweeps with his massive arms, each of which deals massive damage. This lasts around 10 seconds before Sproink returns to his slightly less large, pink self.
     
    #15 Bionichute, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2016
  16. Dr. Slavic

    Dr. Slavic
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    Smash Cadet

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
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    Location:
    Taco Bell probably
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Sharla, from Xenoblade Chrnoicles on the Wii and 3DS, is a field medic from Colony 6. The game's only dedicated healer, Sharla fights with the rifle of her long lost fiancee Galdolt, a Colony 6 soldier who fought in the defense of Colony 6 as mechon attacked, disappearing and presumably eaten. Using the loss of he man to fuel her quest, Sharla joins Shulk and Reyn to help destroy all the mechon. Sharla's arts focus on either fighting opponents from a distance and supporting her allies with stat and health buffs in the heat of battle. Sharla brings her rifle, her medic skills, and her hardwired determination to the battlefield, ready to grab success in the name of her love.

    Stats

    [​IMG]
    Simply put, Sharla is an average fighter. The majority of her stats are either five or six out of ten, but this doesn't necessarily seal the deal, and Sharla gets mileage out of her stats. Sharla focuses on grounded long range combat, and so speed, jumping, and even weight may not be as necessary as it would be on other characters. Later on in the set, Sharla's weight can even be raised through one of her moves, which can help her weakness.

    “My Rifle’s Getting Hotter!”
    Sharla’s rifle is powered by ether, and several of her moves involve firing ether from the rifle. Because ether is, in essence, a form of pure energy, this puts a lot of stress on her rifle in the form of heat, which is the backbone of one of the worst mechanics in Xenoblade. As Sharla’s rifle heats up, she will have to take a break from battle to use her Talent Art Cool Off. This causes her to stop whatever she’s doing and spend several seconds in battle doing nothing but letting her rifle cool off. Because this mechanic is god awful, Sharla’s weapon heat functions differently in Smash to make her more competitive. Her Neutral and Side Specials, Offence and Support Round, will cause a meter under her battle portrait to fill up. This gauge has five segments, and Offence Round will fill one segment of the gauge while Support Round will fill two segments of the gauge. Once the gauge is full, Sharla will announce it by shouting “Ouch! That’s scorching hot!” From this point on, using Offence Round and Support Round will deal 5% nonflinching damage to herself, as the rifle is scalding to the touch. There are a few ways to cool her rifle off, including Heat Bullet from Offence Round and her Down Smash, so Sharla’ can incorporate cooling her rifle off into a battle strategy. Additionally, any move that Sharla has which involves striking the opponent with her rifle will deal 1.25 times as much damage when the rifle gauge is maxed out, as the heat from the rifle will sting more than just Sharla.

    Specials
    Neutral Special - Offence Round
    Tapping this input will cause Sharla to snap her rifle to her shoulder and fire an offensive ether shot from it, while holding the input will cause Sharla to take a knee and gives her the ability to aim up or down within 180 degrees in front of Sharla. Releasing the input will then cause Sharla to fire a shot. Her shots, whichever kind they are, will travel through the air at the speed of Fox’s Blaster, and will disappear after hitting an opponent (or an ally, if Support Round is being used), or after traveling half of Final Destination. Unlike the Star Fox blasters, Sharla’s rifle has a slow firing rate, able to fire off just about one shot per .8 seconds. This move, as well as her next move, involve using different types of ammo to fire from Sharla’s rifle. The first move listed, Thunder Bullet, is the default form of this attack, and just tapping the input will cause her to use it. However, holding the input will cause her to take a knee and aim her rifle. During this time, Sharla can switch her ammo type with the side input, cycling from Thunder Bullet to Metal Blast to Heat Bullet and back to Thunder Bullet. From this point on, tapping the input will allow Sharla to use that move quickly instead, so she can customize her set a bit depending on the circumstances. Her different variants of the attack, which are color coded, are described below.

    Thunder Bullet
    Thunder Bullet, indicated by a pink glow from Sharla’s rifle barrel, is her first form of this move as well as the default form. Upon striking an opponent, the bullet will do a solid 10% damage with minimal flinch and knockback. While basic, this move does good damage from a distance and can help with the support side of Sharla, as she can easily interrupt opponents’ moves using the move, potentially keeping an ally from being struck by a strong move that could kill them. Sharla can also use Thunder Bullet to stop an opponent’s advances and keep them from a distance, where Sharla prefers them to be.

    Metal Burst
    Metal Burst, indicated by a red glow, deals significantly less damage than Thunder Bullet does, only hitting opponent’s for 5% damage. However, Metal Burst has increased knockback, and can actually KO opponents at higher percentages, helping Sharla contribute to the battle from a distance. Additionally, Metal Burst functions as a Shield Breaker, dealing five times as much damage to shields. While not enough to break a shield all on its own, it harshly decreases the longevity of a shield, and with prior shield damage from Sharla or an ally, should be enough to break a shield. The enhanced knockback and long range of the move also mean that foes rarely have a safe chance to exit a shield, and Sharla can sit back and snipe the enemy from afar, should they be occupied with an ally.

    Heat Bullet
    Heat Bullet is indicated by an orange glow. Similar to Metal Burst, Heat Bullet initially deals 5% damage. However, unlike Metal Burst, Heat Bullet has low knockback and killing potential, and does not deal extra damage to shields. However, as mentioned earlier with regards to Sharla’s weapon heat mechanic, Heat Bullet is Sharla’s primary method of cooling her rifle off. The bullet serves as a heat sink, absorbing all the heat from Sharla’s rifle. This heat which the bullet absorbs will be converted into extra damage, dealing an additional 2% for every portion of the gauge that was full prior to using the move, allowing Sharla to deal up to 15% damage with this move. If Sharla’s rifle is overheating already when she uses the move, she will still take 5% damage before the heat is removed, and Heat Bullet adds a portion to the gauge after being fired, not before, so its heat does not add to its damage.

    Side Special - Support Round
    Visually, Support Round is similar to Offence Round, as a tap of the input will cause Sharla to simply fire a shot forward using whichever ammo type she has her Support Round set to. Support Round has almost identical characteristics to Offence Round, with the same animation, mechanics, fire rate, and projectile speed, but, as the name would suggest, these shots serve as support moves rather than offencive options. Additionally, Sharla’s weapon heat gauge will fill up by two segments instead of one when she uses Support Round, as mentioned earlier.


    Heal Blast
    By default, Support Round will be set to Heal Blast, as indicated by Sharla’s rifle barrel glowing a pale green color. These projectiles, rather than hurting opponents, will instead heal allies who are hit by the shot. Simply put, allies will regain 10% of their health when struck by Sharla’s move, a very nice use of her medical skills. This is useful, though not as simple and mindless as some other healing moves are, as Sharla’s bullets move in straight paths, and in the fury of battle an ally will not likely be in the same spot as they were moments before. This requires some leading by Sharla, and can put her in a tricky situation if she spends too long in her aiming stance.

    Shield Bullet
    Another useful move, even more defensive than Heal Blast, Shield Bullet is noted by a blue glow from Sharla’s rifle. Upon striking an ally, they will receive a faint blue aura around them, which will persist until the effect of this move is used up. What is the effect of this move? Allies will gain immunity to damage up to 15%, after which the effect ends and the ally will continue taking damage as normal. Allies under the effects of Shield Bullet will still, however, take knockback from attacks that hit them, and their shields will continue to take damage as normal. Despite a few of its shortcomings, Shield Bullet is an excellent enhancer to Sharla’s allies.

    Aura Bullet
    As Sharla’s rifle glows a deep violet color, she prepares Aura Bullet. When hit, allies will be surrounded by a dim purple aura, similar to the effects they receive from Shield Bullet. However, rather than becoming more defensive, allies will instead have their attack strength boosted, with damage dealt and knockback increased by a rate of 1.20, a simple and very useful buff, though some combo-heavy teammates might not be benefited by the use of the move all the time, such as Fox or Dunban who would rather wait until they are ready to land a killing blow.

    Up Special - Covert Stance
    Upon the ground, Sharla will leap forward or backwards, depending on the direction put, placing herself in the background where she is safe from harm. She will travel a fourth of the distance of Final Destination with this move, and by itself it is a simple and easy recovery move. However, should any attack pass by Sharla as she performs this move that would have struck her otherwise, she will perform her own type of counter, where she immediately returns to the normal plane of combat, snaps her rifle up in the direction of the attack (opposite the direction she was traveling), and fires a simple blast from her rifle. Unlike Offence or Support Round, this blast is not a projectile, just a burst of ether from the barrel of her rifle, and this blast will hit enemies for 15% damage, as well as knocking them away with moderate force. When used in the air, Covert Stance is functionally the same, though Sharla can travel in essentially any direction while she uses it. Besides being a relatively safe recovery and a traveling counter, Sharla’s role as a support character shines through here, as though Sharla prefers to fight at a distance, if an ally is struggling with a foe she can use Covert Stance to get in front of them, activate a counter, and keep them healthier. Covert Stance does have some shortcomings, however. Because the counter is activated immediately, and not at the end of the move, foes can abuse the mechanic if they play clever enough. Projectiles can shut down Sharla’s recovery game, activating her counter in midair and leaving her helpless without risk of injury from the actual counter. Additionally, she is left wide open as she can only counter in one direction, the direction she came from, and triggering her counter leaves an opening for a foe to hit her from behind without fear. Of course, proper support from her teammates will keep Sharla safer, and keep Covert Stance from being obsolete.

    Down Special - Drive Boost
    Sharla braces herself and adopts a defensive stance as she holds her rifle to her shoulder. Sharla enters a state where she will retain this stance for a total of five seconds before it wears off, with no effective way of canceling it. During this stance, Sharla’s feet will be surrounded by a dim red aura, to signal that she is currently in Drive Boost. There are a few changes to Sharla while she is in this mode. First, and most immediately apparent, is that Offence and Support Round receive buffs to their damage / abilities. Thunder Bullet will now deal 15% damage with increased knockback, Metal Blast is boosted to 10% damage, though it now deals 50% shield damage (almost guaranteed to break shields), and can KO foes at damage as low as 165%, and Heat Bullet has its initial damage also set to 10%, allowing it to reach up to 20% at a full heat gauge. On the support side, Sharla will no longer fire shots forward. Instead, when using Support Round, she will aim her rifle directly upwards, shout “Clear!” and fire her rifle, though no projectile leaves the barrel. Instead, all allies and Sharla will automatically gain the benefits of that move inherently, as the ether flows through the air. Heal Blast will now heal allies by 15%, while Sharla will gain 10% of her health back when this move is used. Shield Bullet will protect allies from 25% of damage, as Sharla gets the initial 15% protection, and Aura Bullet increases ally strength by a factor of 1.3 and Sharla’s moves by 1.2. Additionally, as Sharla has assumed a defensive position, she takes significantly less knockback from moves, essentially doubling her weight to that of a heavyweight character. Pretty nifty, right?

    Of course, Sharla has tradeoffs for these boosts, no such thing as a free lunch and all that. First off, Sharla cannot move or jump during Drive Boost, limiting her to where she stands (or where she is knocked to, which can be an issue if she is thrown offstage), and she loses access to Covert Stance as well. Because of this, the movement controls will instead direct where Sharla aims her rifle. This is relevant for both her Specials and her Standards. Additionally, Sharla gains an extra meter of her heat gauge for every use of Offence and Support Round, causing her rifle to heat up much quicker, which can be an issue as she will be taking more damage unless she uses Heat Bullet frequently. Finally, Sharla loses access to her normal Standards, and her Grab Game in this state, instead having ranged moves and no grab. Her non-Special moves will be described in detail throughout the set, though they are fairly simple and all involve firing her rifle. While this doesn’t sound like a big drawback, it does limit her moves, and the rifle’s lag between shots will keep her moves predictable and slow. Luckily, Sharla’s rifle only heats up from Offence and Support Round, and her standard rifle shots use regular, non-ether ammo which does not heat her rifle up. With proper support, Sharla shouldn’t have to worry about most issues using Drive Boost, though weapon heat is always something to keep in mind. Additionally, this is essential for Sharla in 1v1 / FFA, as it gives her access to her buffing moves that would normally serve no purpose by herself.

    Standards
    Jab - Scrapper
    Sharla lifts one leg up, kneeing into the air above her, to start off her jab combo. Upon being struck, opponents will flinch as they take a simple 2% damage. Another press of the input and Sharla stamps her foot downward, almost always hitting the opponent a second time. Once again, the opponent will take 2% damage and be knocked prone on the ground after being stepped on. The last part of this combo has Sharla snap her rifle straight to the foe’s body at her feet and fire a bullet at point blank. This blast will hit opponents directly down in front of her for a final 5% damage and a good chunk of knockback, allowing Sharla to KO her foes at a fairly high percentage. While a nifty combo, Sharla has bad ending lag on a whiff at the start. A piece of fun trivia is that the name for this attack comes from a cutscene in Xenoblade Chronicles where Sharla destroys a mechon in a similar fashion to this, claiming that she won’t stop until she’s scrapped each and every last one of them.

    During Drive Boost, this move is a lot simpler and is no longer a combo. Instead, Sharla will simply fire a bullet in the direction she is facing which travels half the distance of Battlefield before vanishing. The bullet is a simple projectile which deals 5% nonflinching damage to opponents it hits. These bullets fire off slowly, with a .6 second cooldown between shots. However, this time is still the shortest cooldown among any of her Drive Boost Standards or Smashes, so it is a solid option during Drive Boost for fighting from afar.

    Forward Tilt - Head Shaker
    A two part attack, Sharla grips her rifle with both hands and does a short shove forward shoulder-first. Opponents struck by this move are knocked back a negligible distance and take 5% damage upon impact. Sharla then steps forward, taking her rifle and jamming it forward through the air in order to rifle whip the opponent. This second hit does an additional 6% damage and actually has a solid KO potential, knocking out opponents at 140% area. This move has a bit of lag on both ends, though not enough to make it a truly unsafe option.

    During Drive Boost, Sharla will instead fire a bullet in the direction she is aiming, with the same range as her jab during DB. This bullet is instead a tranquilizing round, and while it deals little damage (3%) and does not cause the opponent to flinch, it will instead physically exhaust them a bit. Opponents will find themselves with a much lower jump height and a much higher gravity for a brief time of one second. While situational, Sharla can get a lot of use should she or, more likely, a teammate, knock an opponent off stage while she is in Drive Boost, as she can nerf their ability to get back to the stage greatly. However, Sharla cannot fire another shot from her rifle until .8 seconds have passed since she used this tilt, as is true with her other tilts, so she cannot use this move with the frequency she can her jab.

    Up Tilt - Anti-Air Battery
    This is the only one of Sharla’s tilts that remains the almost the same when she uses it in or out of Drive Boost. With this move, Sharla aims at a point in the sky above her, at an almost 70 degree angle from the ground. Sharla then fires a bullet in that direction which will travel about a crate’s distance in front of her rifle, though in Drive Boost this distance becomes equal to half of Battlefield. This shot does 5% damage to opponents struck by the bullet, and should the foe be airborne they will be meteor smashed out of the air. While it may seem like the ultimate gimping move, outside of Drive Boost Sharla has no way of aiming this move and the range is unreliable, and during Drive Boost Sharla struggles to knock opponents off the stage reliably to KO them with this move. On the ground, foes will be knocked back a bit along with the damage.

    Down Tilt - Low Sweep
    Sharla holds her rifle off to the side and drops to the ground, extending one of her legs into a kick. In addition to dealing 9% damage to opponents and knocking them backwards, allowing her to KO opponents at 150%, but this will drastically reduce her hurtbox height, almost always a good thing for any fighter. This is a decent panic button move, as it is fast to initiate and tends to get Sharla out of the way of attacks while also getting a good hit on the opponent, but the ending lag for Sharla to get back up from the ground is lengthy and can be punished if she abuses the move.

    During Drive Boost, Sharla will aim her rifle downward (unless she has been aimed in a different direction) and will fire a powerful bullet towards the ground. This bullet doesn’t have as much range as all of her other ones, traveling half the distance, but upon impact with the ground, an opponent, or another surface, will actually explode, dealing not only 12% damage but a good chunk of knockback and is one of Sharla’s most reliable tilts for KOs, starting at 125%.

    Dash - Rushdown
    While dashing, Sharla lowers her shoulder and performs a short leap forward, holding her rifle inert. Opponents who are struck will take 14% and are thrown back a bit. This is a fast attack to perform, but will get Sharla up close onto the front line when used, and Sharla specializes in being anywhere but the front line. This move does have decent killing potential (145%+), and similarly to Covert Stance this can be used to protect an ally, interrupting an attack or combo. Ideally, the ally will then follow up with more attacks on the opponent to cover Sharla’s poor close quarters game. While not as powerful or long-ranged as Covert Stance, this move is much harder for opponents to punish and abuse, as she recovers quickly and doesn’t turn around for the attack. Naturally, Sharla cannot dash during Drive Boost, so there is no special variation of the move for it.

    Smashes
    Forward Smash - Point Blank
    Sharla snaps her rifle to attention, but rather than bringing the rifle up to her shoulder and looking through the scope, she will instead leave the gun by her hips as she charges this move. Upon release, Sharla will fire three blasts from her rifle at a steady rate. Rather than firing a bullet, these blasts are pure ether, manifesting as explosions of energy at the barrel of the gun. Depending on charge, each hit can deal upwards 11% damage, but thanks to a hefty chunk of knockback Sharla will very rarely be hitting multiple times with this move. Unfortunately, the knockback isn’t good enough to be an excellent KO move, but can serve as a defensive option for Sharla, as the hitboxes are spread out over time and allow Sharla to pressure advancing opponents away. Sharla’s Smashes are all somewhat defensive, to make up for Sharla’s inability to retreat from opponents. Additionally, this move can be adjusted up or down for each shot, which can versatility to the angle of the move and thus making it harder to avoid.

    During Drive Boost, not only can Sharla use this defensively but the move gains new properties, as expected with moves she has access to in Drive Boost. Sharla will instead fire three physical bullets instead of the ether explosions, and this is an interesting example of a move which doesn’t gain a straight buff from Drive Boost. While the bullets, which only travel a fourth of the distance of Battlefield, have a greater range than the initial move, they each have a smaller hitbox, though they do deal more damage, up to 13%, and greater knockback, able to actually KO at 165% damage.

    Up Special - Mortar
    During the charge animation for this smash, Sharla holds her rifle down, performing maintenance on the gun in preparation for the attack. Once released, Sharla lifts her rifle up and fires a bullet straight up into the air. Unlike most of her other bullets, this bullet only travels up a fourth of the distance of Battlefield. The bullet itself can deal up to 18% damage, with high vertical knockback which can KO at 125%. Of course, the hitbox on the bullet is fairly small, so hitting is not always the easiest thing to do. Should the bullet not make contact with a surface or opponent, it will burst harmlessly, creating a fast-falling rain of ether which surrounds Sharla in a circular range with a radius of one crate on either side of her. The rain strikes opponent for 4% flinching damage, allowing Sharla to very effectively halt an enemy’s advances for a brief moment. Sharla can aim slightly left or right with this move as well, which not only lets her hit opponents above her in a different range but allows her to place the rain of ether over a different center, which can help when fighting with an ally who is having trouble.

    In Drive Boost, the bullet has a greater range than the default, as well as a wider aimable direction, making it easier to hit opponents. Additionally, damage is maxed up to 20%, and can KO at 110%. The rain will now deal 5% damage for each hit on an opponent. However, as an unavoidable trade-off it will take longer for the rain to reach the ground as it starts from higher up. This can limit the moves ability to stop a foes progress as the rain leaves more time to react to the move.

    Down Smash - Heat Sink
    Similar to her Up Smash, Sharla holds her rifle down in an inert position as she fiddles with the mechanisms on the gun. Once released, Sharla dramatically releases one hand off of her rifle, leaning back as she activates the cooling off mechanism on the rifle. This surrounds Sharla with an aura of orange-red heat, with variable damage, range, and knockback. This is Sharla’s other move which can release heat from her rifle, allowing her to cool off while still having an offensive presence (should have done something like that, Xenoblade). The actual knockback on the attack scales based on the charge of the attack, able to KO at 130% at full charge normally. However, damage and range of the aura are based on the heat the weapon has at the time. This scales from 6% damage in an aura that only just surrounds Sharla at no heat on the rifle to dealing 20% damage in an aura nearly the size of a Smart Bomb explosion when the heat gauge is maxed out. Since this fully surrounds Sharla, and relieves the heat of her rifle, this is among her best self-utility moves, and can deal some serious damage when used properly.

    Aerials
    Neutral Aerial - Shell Shocked
    Sharla takes her rifle with both hands, gripping one on the barrel and the other on the stock of the gun, and holding it horizontally in front of herself. Deftly, Sharla shoves the rifle forward, which hits opponents for 7% damage and knocking them away from herself for a bit of knockback. A very basic move, it is briskly performed and begins to illustrate that Sharla is not suited to aerial combat.

    Forward Aerial - Lineup Shot
    A three part attack, Sharla begins this move by pointing her rifle into the air as she knees forward. The knee will deal 5% damage upon hit and knock the opponent slightly upwards, lining them up for the second part of the attack. Sharla then swings her rifle down in an arc so that she is aiming straight forward, dealing another 6% damage and sending the foe in front of Sharla. Finally, Sharla fires a shot forward into the opponent, dealing a final 7% to them and sending them back with the force to KO at 135%. This is a neat combo, though it loses effectiveness as the game goes on since the opponent will be knocked out of the attack more often before it is completed.

    Up Aerial - Tipper Kick
    While going through the air, Sharla twists her body, holds her rifle at her chest, and lifts one leg straight upwards into a skybound kick. The kick is quick, and deals 14% damage on impact with an opponent, knocking them away. However, should Sharla hit with the very tip of her foot, the opponent will be launched upwards, able to KO at 110% damage, an excellent move to use on opponents that Sharla or an ally previously knocked into the air.

    Back Aerial - Stock-holm Syndrome
    Sharla takes her rifle in both hands and aims forward, as if she were about to fire it. However, she abruptly jams the gun backwards, ramming any opponents behind her. This will deal 14% damage to opponents and hurl them away from Sharla with decent (145%+) KO potential. Another quick and simple move for Sharla, though it can be used in conjunction with an ally to combo foes in the air.

    Down Aerial - Airstrike
    Sharla faces the camera and aims her rifle straight downwards, taking aim from behind. As one might expect, Sharla then fires a bullet straight downward, which will travel down a fourth of the distance of Battlefield before vanishing. Opponents struck by the bullet will take 15% damage and be knocked aside, assuming they aren’t struck from directly above. In this situation, they will be meteor smashed, giving Sharla a neat projectile gimping move, like MegaMan. Additionally, Sharla will be boosted slightly in the air when used, allowing a slight bit of additional recovery.

    Grab
    Sharla’s grab is simple, as she holds her rifle in one hand and reaches forward with her other, fast and short-ranged. Once grabbed, Sharla will pummel the opponent for 3% damage by smacking them with her rifle.

    Forward Throw - Ether Explosion
    Sharla releases her hold on the opponent, allowing them to stand up briefly. Sharla then jams the barrel of her rifle against the foe, dealing 4% damage, before firing a shot of ether at point black into the opponent’s body. This burst will deal an additional 8% damage and send them flying away from Sharla, and is able to KO at 140% and above.

    Up Throw - Artillery
    Sharla hurls the opponent into the air one-handedly with disproportional strength, which deals a 5% damage. Afterwards, Sharla will snap her rifle to attention and take aim at the (now) aerial opponent, preparing a shot. Somewhat similar to the Star Fox Up Throw, Sharla will fire an ether round at the opponent and will deal an extra 8% damage as well as knocking the opponents up into the air. While not nearly as good at killing foes as her Forward Throw, this can set Sharla up to follow with an aerial or her Up Smash, or a move from an ally.

    Back Throw - Skull Driver
    Sharla pins the opponent to herself with her rifle, bringing them close to her and securing them with her rifle used like a bar. SHarla then arcs her back as she leans backwards, smashing the opponents head into the ground to deal 13% damage. In addition, opponents will fly away, able to be KO’d at 135% damage and above. A stronger killing move, Sharla has some lag getting out of it as she must stand back up to continue fighting.

    Down Throw - Headshot
    Sharla drives her knee into the opponent, dealing 3% damage as she releases her hold, causing them to fall to the ground. Sharla lifts one foot and steps down on the foe, holding them in place as she lines up a shot with her rifle. Sharla fires the blast, dealing another 13% damage and knocking opponents away slightly. This is Sharla’s strongest throw, but is lengthy in execution which can be dangerous in a 2v2 match.
    Final Smash
    Galdolt’s Memory
    [​IMG]
    Sharla holds a hand to her chest, looking down and, almost sighing, mentions Galdolt’s name. After this, Sharla springs to life, invigorated by his memory. For ten seconds, Sharla will be surrounded by a blue, Monado-esque aura, and is immune to damage and knockback over the duration of the move. Additionally, Sharla can fire all of her moves with less lag and no overheating, with a slight damage boost to her attacks and general speed as well.

    Playstyle
    [​IMG]
    If it hasn’t been made obvious by this point in the moveset, Sharla’s moveset focuses on 2v2, or the occasional 3v1, gameplay. Sharla, as she is in the game, is a support character, using Shield Bullet, Heal Blast, and Aura Bullet to keep her allies doing well in battle. Additionally, many of her attacks, such as Metal Blast, Covert Stance, and her dash attack, work to gang up on opponents and protect her allies by getting in the fray. Sharla needs offensive support from her allies as much as they use her status support, and many of Sharla’s killing moves are more effective when an ally sets an opponent up, such as her Up Tilt. Of course, having a character only effective on teams would be tacky, and Sharla is more than capable of fighting on her own, even if she does better with a teammate. Drive Boost is essentially mandatory to a solo fight, as she does not have access to her Support Round otherwise, which is a keystone of her moveset. Additionally, Sharla will likely overheat less often, as she will not be supporting any other members of her team, which is what boosts her heat meter the most. Sharla also has some capable solo moves, especially in her throws, and will actually play more close up, utilizing her standards and smashes rather than sitting in one spot, as she doesn't have the support to allow her to do so.

    Flavor
    Entrance - Sharla appears on the stage. She doesn't have any cool animations, she just walks out of a blue Monado-y cloud, aiming her gun and ready to fight.
    Boxing Ring Title - Medic with a Vengeance
    Up Taunt - Sharla hold one hand over heart, murmuring "Galdolt..." under her breath.
    Side Taunt - Sharla holds her rifle vertically and points forward, saying "I can see your strength is the genuine article!"
    Down Taunt - Sharla fires a blank into the air, shouting "This is for Colony 6!"
    Victory Pose A - Sharla leans on her rifle, using it as a prop, and saying "Well, that was easy!" nonchalantly.
    Victory Pose B - Sharla, looking determined, fires two shots, and without saying a word lifts her rifle over her shoulder.
    Victory Pose C - Sharla fires a shot into the air, exclaiming "Galdolt would be so proud!"
    Losing Pose - Sharla holds her rifle in the crook of her arm as she claps politely.
    Victory Theme - The same snippet from “You Will Know Our Names” as Shulk

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    #16 Dr. Slavic, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2016
    Munomario777 and JOE! like this.
  17. Dr. Slavic

    Dr. Slavic
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    Smash Cadet

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
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    73
    Location:
    Taco Bell probably
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    Dunban hails from Xenoblade Chronicles for the Wii / 3DS, and also makes an appearance in Super Smash Bros. for the Wii U and 3DS as part of Shulk’s Final Smash. Dunban is a homs, a species equivalent to humans that live on Bionis, and is respected as the greatest hero of the homs. One year prior to the story of Xenoblade Chronicles, Dunban wielded the almighty Monado alongside his mates Mumkhar and Dickson, protecting the Bionis from an onslaught of Mechon at Sword Valley. Dunban was not destined to use the Monado as Shulk was, and as such using the sword drained him of his vitality, and after the Battle of Sword Valley, Dunban needed urgent care and ultimately lost the use of his right hand. However, upon rejoining the party over the course of the game, Dunban proves himself to still be one of the world’s greatest warriors, even without his other arm, and has a variety of arts both ether and physical that can inflict nasty debuffs on enemies when used in combos. Dunban specializes in his strength and agility, and is considered one of the games tanks despite his low health and defense, as his high agility allows him to dodge many attacks.

    Stats

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    Dunban’s stats set him up as a frail fast character, and that is exactly who he plays. Dunban plays a fast game, keeping up with many of the games faster characters and taking hits about as well as them too. In fact, outside of weight, Dunban’s stats are all pretty nice, and has a lethal combination of ground and air control. Dunban’s stats change as the battle go on, as covered in depth below, and Dunban can become incredibly fast if not taken out quickly. All in all, Dunban is a fast, fierce fighter, but lacks the weight to take heavy hits.

    Invincible Hero, Serene Heart
    Part of Dunban’s fighting style revolves around how much damage he has, much like Lucario’s Aura mechanic. However, Dunban’s physical attacks are actually weaker as he takes damage rather than stronger, and his moves are especially potent at the beginning of a stock. Every 30% that Dunban takes his attacks will lose power by a factor of .1 (Starts at 100% of the strength, becomes 90% after 30%, 80% after 60%, etc.). Perhaps it would be more appropriate to say that Dunban gains strength the less damage he has, as his moves do not become unusable as he takes damage (up to a certain point), but rather Dunban starts out a stock very powerful. This should inspire a fast but cautious style from the player, wanting to rush opponents down with precision to defeat opponents quickly. As an important note, this does not counteract the knockback increase of rage mechanics. However, damage isn’t entirely bad for Dunban, as his speed actually increases with more damage. Inverted from his strength loss, Dunban’s ground, air, and attack speed increase by a factor of .1 for every 30% damage Dunban takes, and this can be especially scary to Dunban’s opponents. A few of Dunban’s non-physical attacks are also powered up by the damage Dunban takes. This also prevents foes from whittling Dunban’s health away as fast as they can with a hit and run or projectile strategy, as Dunban will quickly become an even bigger potential problem. instead, foes fighting Dunban will want to cut straight to the kill, and, luckily for them, Dunban has a low weight and can be killed easier than some other fighters.

    However, should Dunban hit 160% damage or above, something different will happen. Dunban will be surrounded by a faint orange aura, will no longer experience a dip in his damage, and instead the adrenaline will push him to strike even harder, causing his physical moves to deal 1.25 times their normal damage. Additionally, Dunban will still retain his boosted speed, and this combination will make Dunban a beast in battle if he ever gets to this point. Of course, Dunban is frailer than one might hope for a character who benefits from taking damage, but there are a few options Dunban has to help achieve this status without getting absolutely annihilated by the opponent. For the sake of damage calculation, unless otherwise stated, all attacks are considered at 0% damage for Dunban.

    Specials
    Neutral Special - Tempest Kick
    Dunban holds his blade to the side and leaps forward, one leg extended, in an extended kick. From a standstill, Dunban will travel only a very short distance and, upon striking an opponent, will deal out 8% damage with weak knockback. For a special this move seems rather lackluster. Of course there is something more to this attack. While in motion, Tempest Kick will carry Dunban farther and deal more damage. At a walk, the kick will deal 10% damage, while a run will deal 12% and carry Dunban a fair distance for a kick. Finally, at a full dash, Dunban will lunge forward and his foot will be engulfed by a wild aura of green ether. This ether will create a small green wall that will launch from Dunban’s foot at his dash speed. This wall flies forward three crates’ worth of distance and will deal 10% damage upon contact with opponents. Not only does this give Dunban a nice projectile to hit opponents with, especially as his ether attacks do not lose damage as Dunban takes damage, but is useful for covering Dunban’s approach. While opponents can shield against the ether, Dunban can dash along right behind the wave of ether and get in close to the opponent to strike with a stronger attack. A simple attack to kick off the set, it is crucial for Dunban’s approach game and serves to show the benefit Dunban gets from constantly moving.

    Side Special - Gale Slash
    Dunban charges forward at his current dash speed, holding his blade across his body while he does so. Depending on Dunban’s dash speed, as based on his current damage, Dunban will travel forward anywhere between 3 and 5 crates’ worth of distance, or until he runs into an opponent. At the end of the attack, whether he hits an opponent or runs the course of the attack, Dunban will slash his sword outward and off to the side. This move will deal a solid 8% damage upon a hit and knock the opponent backwards weakly, another simple Dunban special that lacks killing power. This may seem odd, but Gale Slash is even more important to Dunban’s playstyle than Tempest Kick. Gale Slash is Dunban’s best combo-starter, and Dunban specializes in ground combos. The low knockback allows Dunban to quickly and fiercely follow up with more attacks, and beyond that, Gale Slash will continue to move forward for a brief moment past striking outward, allowing Dunban to immediately continue into his dash, keeping the momentum. This is useful should Dunban still deal too much knockback to normally follow up, as he can continue his approach without so much as a blink. As an aside for now, though this is crucial to Dunban’s set, several of Dunban’s standards have bonus effects when used directly after Gale Slash, increasing its use as a combo-starter. Additionally, Dunban can angle the end of this move up, down, or forward, as well as the diagonals between, allowing him to choose which direction opponents are nkocked so he can more accurately choose which combo to use.

    Up Special - Thunder
    Yet another one of Dunban’s moves that rely on his speed, and thusly his damage, Thunder is, similar to a dashing Tempest Kick, also an ether attack unaffected by his power loss. When used on the ground and at a standstill, Dunban will hold his sword towards the ground as a golden burst of electric ether erupts behind him. This cloud of ether fills a radius of an activated Hothead, and opponents who touch this will take 6% damage and be thrown back a fair distance, the most out of any of Dunban’s specials, but will only KO close to 200% damage normally. However, as this move was mentioned to rely on speed for its characteristics, Dunban’s momentum changes how the move functions. At a walk, Dunban will be propelled forward a minute distance by this ether burst, which creates a wider hitbox that deals 8% damage on a hit, as well as dealing more knockback. At a run, the Thunder streaks along and pushes Dunban even further, gaining an increase in damage up to the expected 10%, and at a full dash Dunban will travel forward five crates of distance, with damage cranked up to 12% and opponents being launched with the force to KO at 175%. Additionally, the speed that Dunban gains after every 50% damage will increase the damage of this attack in all forms by 1% for every 50%.

    Since this is Dunban’s recovery move, Thunder functions differently in the air. The concept is the same, a powerful burst of electric ether propelling Dunban forward. However, unlike on the ground where Dunban will only move forward while using the move, Dunban will travel in any direction inputted. The distance recovered, as well as the damage, also relies on Dunban’s momentum. While falling, this move is as powerful as Dunban’s walk variation of the move, and does not serve well as a recovery. If Dunban jumps and uses Thunder at the peak of the jump, it will function as if Dunban were running on the ground, and if Dunban is peaking during his double jump it functions like his dash variation of the attack. When properly used, not only can Dunban reliably make it back to the stage but this can serve as a powerful anti-gimping tool, as the burst of ether will greatly punish foes should they miss their gimp. Dunban also finds benefit from using Thunder in the air while falling, as the lack of momentum allows Dunban to fall as he uses the move which can help get Dunban back to the stage, as ground-bound foes will opt to avoid the electric hitbox of the move.


    Down Special - Final Flicker
    Dunban swipes his blade one time with determination to his side, and as he does so a blood red cloud surrounds Dunban. Players unfamiliar with Dunban’s moveset may be shocked to watch as Dunban takes 25% damage all at once. More damage than almost any attacks in the game do, one almost definitely wonders why Dunban, as frail as he is, would simply allow himself to take this much damage. This red aura about Dunban will persist for three seconds, and, during this aura, Dunban will increase the damage and knockback of all of his attacks by a degree of 1.5 times, taking into account the damage decrease Dunban is suffering. This trade-off is important to Dunban, as while he is capable of high damage output normally Dunban can have issues with his killing power, especially on heavier targets. This can help Dunban land KO’s more easily, which is naturally the name of the game. Additionally, this can help Dunban push himself into the next speed bracket, as there is more benefit for being at 90% damage and gain the additional speed then at 75% damage and have no benefit for that damage. Finally, in dire situations, Dunban can use this to force himself into the 160% range, aiding his damage output, and for three seconds having the strength of his moves boosted to almost double their original power. Of course, the negative impact of this move was essentially spelled out already, and using this move properly or improperly can turn a battle in either direction.

    Standards
    Jab - Heroic Combo
    Dunban stands his ground with a powerful stance as he tucks his blade under his crippled arm, followed by a forward strike with his elbow. This blow deals 5% damage and little knockback. Continuing the combo, Dunban ‘unsheathes’ his blade from his armpit and slashes outward, dealing another 7% damage and pushing the opponent slightly farther back. Finally, Dunban leans back and delivers a mighty kick for 4% damage, and the kick has relatively more knockback than the other parts of this move, giving Dunban just a little space to start up a dash or follow up attack. A simple combo that can be used to get a little damage and prepare a combo, though not nearly as useful as Gale Slash.

    Forward Tilt - Worldly Slash
    Dunban swings his blade twice with ferocity, in an x formation. Each slash will deal 9% damage to opponents struck, the first slash dealing a small amount of knockback while the second one has the ability to KO opponents beginning at 175%. At low percentages, opponents will be drawn into the second slash with ease, allowing the move to deal the full extent of its potential, but at higher percentages opponents, especially lighter ones, may be knocked out of the attack and miss the second blow, which is more likely to KO. A solid attack, this move is the first of Dunban’s standards which combo directly off of Gale Slash. When used immediately (within a fraction of a second) after landing a Gale Slash, the strike from this move will not only damage opponents but will lower their threshold to damage as well, increasing the damage and knockback they take by 1.2 times, a debuff which lasts the duration of two seconds. While a slim window, this should enable Dunban to land a killing blow, and this combo is useful in a few situations. At higher percentages, Dunban will struggle to deal damage, and lowering the opponent’s defense is an effective way of reversing this weakness. Additionally, some heavier opponents may prove resilient to Dunban’s attacks normally, and this can be one way Dunban bypasses his low killing potential.

    Up Tilt - Metal Blossom
    Dunban swings his sword over his head in a simple, yet precise, arc forward through the air. Opponents struck by the slash at any point will take 17% damage and be launched at a tangent relative to the point in the arc they were struck, though the knockback is fairly weak and allows Dunban to follow up with another move, depending on where the opponent was knocked away. Additionally, this move can be used directly after Gale Slash to activate another combo effect, although this does not weaken the foe’s defense. Instead, opponents struck by this move will become afflicted with a damage over time status known as bleed, which will cause them to take 3% damage every half a second over the course of two seconds. While not as inherently useful for killing as the effect on the Forward Tilt, this is still useful for whittling opponents’ health away and weakening them for a take down.

    Down Tilt - Electric Gutbuster
    Among Dunban’s simplest moves, he will lift his foot up and simply kick forward, sword tucked away safely. Upon connecting with a foe, the kick will deal 15% damage and knock the opponent away ever so slightly, and, as with most of Dunban’s standards, can be followed up into a bigger combo to crank up the damage. Also similar to Dunban’s previous standards (sans the jab), this tilt has a unique effect when used directly after Gale Slash. Upon kicking the opponent, rather than giving out weak knockback, the foe will instead be buffeted by the (usually) organ-level kick, and will be knocked prone for a moment. Dunban needs to act fast, but this is an excellent opportunity for Dunban to land a killing Smash on the opponent.

    Dash Attack - Steel Strike
    While rushing forward, Dunban lifts his sword over his shoulder and, upon stopping, smacks the foe roughly with the hilt of his sword. Unexpectedly powerful, this strike will deal 16% damage and knock opponents back, able to KO at 145% and above, making this Dunban’s best standard for killing. The additional effect this move gains by using it immediately after Gale Slash turns this move into a shield killer. While not necessarily guaranteed to destroy every shield, Steel Strike will now deal thrice as much damage to shields, and should an opponent believe a Gale Slash coming and attempt to shield from it they can be punished. Of course, dodging is also an iffy option for opponents seeing a dashing Dunban, as he can transfer perfectly into Thunder and attack behind him rather than in front. Steel Strike, Thunder, and Gale Slash all work together well, and the ability to switch between them can mess with opponents and place the pressure on them something fierce.

    Smashes
    Forward Smash - Demon Slayer
    As Dunban charges this move he holds his sword in his outstretched arm, blade facing outward and laying vertically towards the ground (imagine a thumbs down but with a sword instead of a thumb). Upon release, Dunban swipes his blade up one time before performing a vicious downward slash, a two pronged attack. The first hit of the move does little knockback and will dish out 6% damage at max charge. The second portion of the attack will deal greatly increased damage, up to an additional 22% damage at full charge. This is also Dunban’s first move with competent killing potential, as the move can KO as low as 115%. This move, especially when the opponent is at low percentages, is effective for damage, as opponents struck by both parts of the attack take nearly 30% damage unboosted at max charge, a very devastating move. Eventually, though, this move loses its use as high percentage opponents may be knocked away by the first part of the attack, rather than being struck by the second part which has killing power. Cosmetically, at full charge, a faint demon face will appear like an aura around Dunban when this move is released.

    Up Smash - Soaring Tempest
    Dunban holds his blade down to the side and crouches, charging up this move. Upon release, Dunban leaps upward and corkscrews, spiraling with his blade extended. Dunban leaps up half his regular jump height during this move, and Dunban’s sword strikes all around him which creates a wide hitbox to strike opponents with. Upon a strike, opponents will take up to 24% damage and be flung away, starting to KO at 125% damage. While an easy to hit move, it is also Dunban’s weakest Smash for both damage and knockback, and Dunban is momentarily helpless after using this move, as he will fall to the ground. While not a tragic weakness of the move, it can still be abused by opponents if Dunban relies on this Smash too much. Still, very useful for hitting foes, especially in the air.

    Down Smash - Heat Haze
    Should Dunban have a lot of damage on him, and thusly lowering his damage output, one should not worry, as Dunban also has an ether-based Smash that allows him to ignore the negative effects of his characteristics. When used, Dunban will hold his sword facing towards the ground and, upon release, stabs his sword into the ground. As he steels himself with his sword, Dunban will become surrounded by an orange aura that encompasses him entirely. This aura will strike all around Dunban, hitting opponents for up to 25% damage and throwing them back, able to KO at 130% damage. Dunban then pulls his blade from the ground as the aura dissipates, ready to fight once again. If Dunban is feeling pressured, this is an excellent move to use as it strikes all around him, and is, as mentioned before, useful for higher percentages on Dunban, as this move will not lose its power.

    Aerials
    Neutral Aerial - Heat Burst
    Visually similar to Dunban’s Down Smash, he will suddenly be surrounded by the same orange aura. This aura lingers for half of a second before disappearing, and opponents will take 15% damage upon a hit, being knocked away weakly from Dunban. As this is an ether attack, Dunban will always deal this damage (unless Final Flicker is used), and this move will maintain Dunban’s momentum when used. This allows Dunban to start off aerial combos, as he can knock opponents in the direction he is moving and follow up with one of his aerials, often his forward aerial. Similar to how Thunder can be used, Dunban can use this move to secure a safe descent back to the stage, as the hitbox lingers for a moment and keeps opponents away from Dunban.

    Forward Aerial - Eagle Pursuit
    Dunban lunges forward through the air, bringing his sword down in front him in a great overhead slash. Upon striking an opponent, they will take 18% damage, and be thrown back, able to knockout starting at 135% and higher. This move is one of Dunban’s most reliable options for KOing foes, and is faster and less telegraphed than Dunban’s Smashes. However, while there is little starting lag, there is sizable ending lag which allows Dunban to be punished on a miss. This move is great to be used after the Neutral Aerial, as it allows Dunban to position the opponent for a follow-up, and the extra damage from the move will help land a killing blow as well.

    Up Aerial - Steel Cyclone
    With one mighty strike, Dunban thrusts his blade directly up into the air above him. This aerial strike will stab foes for 9% damage, and rather than knocking them away will secure them on his blade in place. Normally, this doesn't have any additional effect aside from keeping the foe close to Dunban, good for following up with other moves to get more damage on a healthier foe. This limits the move initially, but if this aerial is used directly after Gale Slash is, Dunban will not only execute this move but he will punctuate it with a slash downwards, which drags the opponent downwards in a swift, powerful motion. Here, the foe is essentially meteor-mashed, flung off the blade with great force as they take an additional 8% damage for a total of 17% damage. Not too shabby, but this move is still hard to land after using Gale Slash, as should Dunban hit the foe they will rarely be knocked up at an angle and distance conducive to this follow up.

    Back Aerial - Thunder Wave
    Dunban leans forward slightly as a small burst of electric ether erupts from his back, very similar to Dunban’s Thunder. This will push Dunban forward, although not nearly to the same degree as Thunder and Dunban will only charge forward, no directional input for this attack. This will only push Dunban forward one crate’s worth of space, though it will boost Dunban’s speed through the air, aiding his momentum keeping moves or his actual Thunder attack. Opponents struck behind Dunban by the burst will take 15% damage and be thrown back, killing at 165% and higher. Of course, as this is an ether move it will not depreciate in damage, something Dunban definitely appreciates.

    Down Aerial - Tempest Step
    Dunban performs a simple stomp downward with one foot, his foot being engulfed in a cloud of green ether. Should Dunban hit an opponent at this moment, while his foot is still surrounded by this aura, opponents will take 18% damage and will be meteor smashed, an excellent move for Dunban to outcompete other aerial opponents, or to gimp foes that Dunban set up prior to this move. Should Dunban miss with this small, brief hitbox, not to worry, as Dunban will fire off this cloud of ether similar to Tempest Kick, though aimed directly downward, and a smaller and shorter hitbox. This aura will deal only 15% damage rather than the 18% in exchange for the range, although the ranged variation of this move takes away the ability to meteor smash opponents. Still, a useful move for Dunban, especially when dealing with ground-bound foes or opponents that are in prime spots to be gimped.

    Grab
    Unfortunately for Dunban but fortunately for style points, the loss of his right arm prevents him from simply grabbing opponents while still maintaining his blade. As such, Dunban will instead stab his sword forward, skewering opponents and securing them in place. A fairly long range grab that is actually fairly fast, Dunban’s grab should be avoided. Dunban’s pummel will cause him to knee the opponent, dealing 3% damage per pummel. Dunban’s pummel, as well as his throws, are similar to his ether attacks in that they do not lose damage over time. At high percentages Dunban can still rely on his grab game if he is having trouble with opponents.

    Forward Throw - Drawing Kick
    Dunban yanks his sword out from the opponent roughly, dealing 4% damage as he does so. Dunban then leans backwards and kicks the opponent away, dealing an additional 8% damage for 12% total. Additionally, the opponents will be knocked moderately, an optimal distance for following up with one of Dunban’s dashing attacks or a smash attack. Not much more to this throw, this is a solid option for Dunban consistently, giving him space should he need it.

    Up Throw - Crescent Slash
    Dunban once again draws his blade from the captured opponent, dealing 4% damage once more. Now that Dunban’s sword is free again, he will swing his sword upwards in a great arc, striking the opponent for an additional 9% damage. The opponent will be knocked up into the air moderately, giving Dunban options on how to proceed, as he could follow up with an aerial, wait for a tilt, or use the time to pull off a safe Final Flicker to try and follow up for a KO. Another simple throw but pivotal for providing Dunban options, as most of his throws are.

    Back Throw - Blunt Strike
    Upon retrieving his blade from the enemy, dealing another 4% damage as to be expected by now. Dunban then crashes the hilt of his sword on his opponent’s head, dealing an additional 5% damage. Finally, Dunbun slashes the opponent roughly, dragging them into the foreground/background and throwing them behind Dunban, doing a final 6% damage. While cool to watch, there aren’t many options Dunban can go to from this throw, though it is ideal for following up with Thunder. A decent throw if Dunban needs to get away from opponents and he can dash, Thunder, or Gale Slash away to give him space.

    Down Throw - Jaws of Death
    After pulling his sword from the opponent for the 4% damage, Dunban allows the opponent to stand for a moment of peace. Afterwards, Dunban rapidly slashes the opponent with great ferocity and speed, delivering 5 powerful strikes for 2% each, ultimately dealing an additional 10% damage. Finally, after relenting with his sword, Dunban delivers a sound kick into the opponent, dealing a final 3% damage and knocking them forward a short bit. An excellent throw for Dunban, dealing a lot of damage and allowing Dunban to follow up with a Smash, Dash, or Gale Slash, depending on how far away the opponent was kicked.

    Final Smash
    Blossom Dance

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    Similar to Shulk’s Final Smash, this moveset takes the form of a cutscene should Dunban connect with the opponent. Dunban will attempt to initiate the attack by performing a simple downward slash, starting the cutscene if one, or multiple, opponents are struck. In this cutscene, Dunban is flanked by his compatriats from the Battle of Sword Valley, Dickson and Mumkhar. Dickson is armed with a gunblade, Mumkhar with metal claws, and Dunban appears wielding none other than the Monado! All three point forward as Dunban narrates “Born in a world of strife!”. Mumkhar then assaults the opponent viciously, leaping forward and shredding them with his claws. This part will deal out a total of 20% damage, while Dunban is continuing with “Against the odds!”. Afterwards, Dickson leaps forward and fires two shots into the opponent, each one dealing 10% damage as Dunban recites “We choose to fight!”. FInally, Dunban leaps through the air with the monado, driving it down onto the opponent(s) while shouting “Blossom Dance!” This last blow will deal a final 15% damage, ending the move and launching opponents with the ability to KO foes at 75% and above, a powerful, and fun, Final Smash.

    Playstyle
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    Dunban’s playstyle focuses on fast, precise blows and rapid combos, and every match Dunban plays is going to be aggressive. Dunban doesn’t like taking hits at all, not only because of his low weight making him easy to KO, but because damage will severely impact Dunban’s own strength. Luckily, Dunban has the potential to do some serious damage and cripple opponents early on, but even still Dunban has an issue with his poor KO moves, and his few moves allow opponents to predict when he goes in for a kill. Dunban should have no trouble chasing the opponent down with the tools at his disposal, such as Gale Slash, Tempest Kick, and his dash attack, and upon reaching them he can rack up good combo damage to help his high-damage KO moves. Gale Slash lends itself well to a combo with his Forward Tilt or Down Tilt, and his Down Tilt lends itself to follow combos well, thanks to low KO potential. Opponents in the air should watch out not just for combos but for his Forward Air’s good killing potential, and his Down Air has nice gimping properties, even if Dunban misses the initial strike. Should Dunban take damage, not all is lost as his ability to gain speed based on that can help mitigate the impact. Final Flicker is a tricky move to use in Dunban’s playstyle, and a single poor use of it can turn the table away from Dunban in a heartbeat. Typically, Dunban will want to use Final Flicker at high damage percentages, trying to push himself into a bracket where he has not only the increased speed from his latent ability but the power boost at 250% and higher. Of course, with his low weight, this is not a reliable strategy and exists as a contingency for when things go very wrong for Dunban.

    Flavor
    Entrance - Dunban leaps onto the starting point from offscreen, slashing his sword once in preperation before holding the blade in front of himself.
    Boxing Ring Title - The Hero of the Homs
    Up Taunt - Dunban slashes his sword once through the air with a collected vigor, stating “We mustn't be careless!”
    Side Taunt - Dunban smirks and places his sword over his shoulder, taunting the opponent’s performance by saying “Amateurish.”
    Down Taunt - Dunban holds his blade in front of himself, pointing forward with the sword and shouting “I don’t have time for small fry!”
    Victory Pose A - Dunban performs two precise slashes with his sword before turning away from the camera silently, sword over his shoulder.
    Victory Pose B - Dunban stabs his sword in the ground, exclaiming “Feel the flow of battle!”
    Victory Pose C - Dunban performs a single slash, reminding himself “Don’t get cocky; stay focused, stay sharp.”
    Losing Pose - Dunban looks on from the side, with his sword over his shoulder, with a look of prideful determination on his face, proud to have met a worthy opponent.
    Victory Theme - The same snippet from “You Will Know Our Names” as Shulk.

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    #17 Dr. Slavic, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2016
  18. Dr. Slavic

    Dr. Slavic
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    Smash Cadet

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    Taco Bell probably
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    Melia is a character from Xenoblade Chronicles for the Wii and 3DS. Melia is a member of a race of humanoids known as the High Entia. The High Entia are an ancient, but highly civilized and technologically forward, species who inhabit Bionis along with the Homs, Nopon, and other creatures of the world. However, the High Entia seal themselves away in the upper regions of Bionis, above the Eryth Sea in their capital, Alcamoth. Melia Antiqua is a member of the royal family, daughter of the emperor Sorean and his human consort. Because of this, Melia is only half High Entia, her other half being human, and some view her as unworthy to lead the High Entia as empress. When first encountered, Melia is shown tracking down a powerful monster known as a telethia, and this is where Shulk and his friends enter the picture, helping Melia hunt down and kill the telethia in the dense Makna Forest. Melia is the most powerful Ether user available to the party, and her focus is on buffing her and her allies using summoned Elementals, and then using those Elementals to damage and debuff her foes. Melia can be one of the strongest members of the party, and can find use in almost any battle, even able to damage normally impervious Mechon without need for Shulk or the Monado using her powerful Ether attacks. Melia carries these traits into the battlefield to take on her opponents in Smash Bros.

    Stats
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    Melia’s stats are all over the place and seem to lack any real focus. She stands just short of Shulk but has little weight to keep her grounded, an issue for Melia who has few very close range options when it comes down to a fight. Her ground speed is middling, though she is not a rushdown character and does not necessarily need the speed to be successful. Her air stats are her best stats, and though she isn’t winning awards for them, Melia has a couple of aerial options that compliment these stats well, which are sometimes her best bet among her offensive options. If her stats look underwhelming, don’t let that keep her from being an excellent character. Not only does she have powerful moves and even some combo potential, Melia is also capable of altering her stats throughout the battle. While these won’t be drastic enough to turn her comparable to Ganon in weight or Sonic in speed, these changes can make a big difference in Melia’s style and causes her to be a different fighter almost every time she’s played.

    Specials
    Neutral Special - Summon Elemental / Elemental Discharge
    With a tap of the input, Melia throws one hand downward and, gripping her staff tightly with the other, thrusts it into the air with glorious intention! As she does this, the Crown Princess shouts an inspiring and drawn out ‘Summon!’, which lasts just under half a second. During this blurb, the player can choose to press any from a selection of inputs to influence what Melia summons. Her summons, known as Elementals, are small orbs of ether, which provide buffs to Melia and can be used as projectiles that damage and debuff opponents. Each Elemental is approximately the size of a Pokeball, and though they appear around Melia they have no physical hitbox or collisions while inert. Melia can have three of these Elementals active at a time, and as they hover around her they can be reliably kept track of on the HUD. Over top of Melia’s image is a translucent symbol, similar to the one which appears heading this move. A smaller symbol for each Elemental will appear while they are summoned, and their position is relative to when they were summoned. The first Elemental summoned will have their symbol appear to the left of her Talent Art symbol, the second one summoned will appear to the right, and the last one summoned will appear underneath the main symbol. Melia can have repeated Elementals as well, and their effects do stack. The associated input for each Elemental, as well as its buff, is listed below, but these buffs are generally weaker than Shulk’s Monado Arts. However, Melia’s Elementals provide no debuffs to her while active, and are active as long as Melia doesn’t discharge them or lose a stock. Melia can also customize her gameplay far more by mixing and matching Elementals. Unfortunately for her, she is a stationary target while summoning an Elemental, whereas Shulk has the freedom to continue moving and fighting.

    Should the input be held rather than tapped, Melia will point her staff forward to launch one of her summoned Elementals. Melia will launch whichever Elemental was summoned last, accompanied by an empowered shouting of ‘Manifest yourself!’ The Elemental will fly forward, moving at almost the same speed as Zelda’s Din’s Fire. Though they cannot be aimed or controlled, the projectile Elemental will home in on opponents within a 180 degree radius (they will not turn back towards Melia ever). Upon hitting an opponent, each Elemental will deal damage accompanied with a different effect, often a debuff or an inconvenience for the foe. The discharge of an Elemental takes a bit of time, with three-fourths of a second before Melia is able to discharge another, to prevent her from spamming projectiles. With each discharged Elemental, the Talent Art symbol mentioned above begins to ‘fill up’, becoming opaque from the bottom up. Every five discharged Elementals will completely fill the symbol up, and in this situation Melia will cry out ‘I can feel the ether flowing through me!’ as she enters Element Burst state. In this form, Melia is surrounded by a colorful, fluctuating aura and receives a buff to her speed and jumps, with 20% added to both, while her Elemental buffs are blocked. Melia will also take 1.3 times as much damage and knockback in this form, however, turning her into a glass cannon. Melia’s Down Special, Shadow Stitch, is replaced with a different move, Burst End, in this form, many of her standard moves are powered up due to Element Burst, and Melia’s next discharged Elemental will have a more powerful effect than normal. Once she discharges an Elemental, when she uses Burst End, or after seven seconds have passed, she will take a deep breath as this state ends and she returns to her normal self. Melia will also lose Element Burst should she lose a stock, as one might expect.


    No Input - Summon Bolt
    Shouting out “Bolt!”, a glowing ball of ether flies from Melia’s staff, yellow in color. While active, any of Melia’s ether-based attacks, including Elemental Discharge, have their damage increased by 1.2 times, rounded to the nearest percentage, and their knockback is scaled by 1.2 times as well. As with all Elementals, this effect can stack on itself, allowing Melia to increase the damage of her ether moves by 1.6 times as much. If Melia has multiple Bolts summoned, and she discharges one, it is not counted for a damage buff, i.e. if three are out and one is used, the move only gains 1.4 times the damage rather than 1.6.

    Discharge Bolt
    Melia’s most powerful Elemental damage-wise, opponents hit by Bolt take 12% and a bit of knockback, starting to knock opponents out at 175%. A simple move in concept, it is Melia’s strongest Elemental for attacking and also an important one for its useful buff. Players must choose whether they think they can take opponents out quickly and rely on Bolt for its offensive presence or to take a slow approach via buffs from Summon Bolt or other Elementals.

    Element Burst
    While in Element Burst, Bolt receives an increase in both damage and knockback, becoming Melia’s strongest attack and one of her best killing moves. Bolt gains an increase in damage to a whopping 20%. Opponents hit by this mighty magic are sent flying backwards with the force to KO at as low as 130%. Luckily, Bolt’s buff is blocked during Element Burst, preventing her from launching one capable of dealing 28% damage. As is the case with all Elementals, firing Bolt will end Element Burst immediately afterwards.

    Standard Input - Summon Flare
    Finishing her sentence with ‘Flare!’ Melia’s staff produces a burning red ball of ether to levitate around her. While active, Flare increases the damage and knockback of all of Melia’s physical attacks by 1.2 times as much, again capping at 1.6 for three summons. While Bolt is generally more useful, as Melia prefers spaced fighting, it is still beneficial for her Spear Break and Starlight Kick specials (explained below), and increased knockback on many of her staff moves allow her to more effectively space herself from the opponent. Having multiple Flares out also allows Melia the freedom to attempt a more physical playstyle, should she so choose.

    Discharge Flare
    Flare deals 5% fire damage to opponents, just like Mario’s Fireball, as well as a decent amount of hitstun. While seemingly lackluster compared to Bolt, Flare has the excellent effect of shield destruction. Should Flare hit the opponent’s shield, it will deal five times as much damage to it, taking away half of the shield’s durability instantly. This allows Melia to deal with opponents blocking her Elementals, and opponents are easily punished if they don’t pay attention to which Elementals she has out and in which order.

    Element Burst
    Flare will deal 8% damage to opponents, rather than 5%, but keeps the same hitstun and the same damage towards shields, keeping at 25% rather than 40% as expected. However, should an Element Burst-boosted Flare hit an opponent’s shield, it will also ‘burn’ the shield, turning it a smoky red and dealing 2% damage to the opponent for every time they use their shield and every half second they stay in their shield. This effect lasts for 5 seconds before ending and is an extremely effective way of dealing with shield-happy combatants.

    Shield Input - Summon Earth
    With a resounding ‘Earth!’ Melia creates a dull brown orb of ether from her staff. Unlike Bolt and Flare, Earth does not increase any damage that Melia deals, but instead filters damage out to keep her safe. For each copy of Earth that Melia has summoned she takes .1 times less damage and knockback from any physical attacks she is struck by, capping out at .3 times less physical damage and knockback. This is useful for giving Melia more ‘weight’ so to speak and just one copy of Earth can mean the difference between surviving a hit or not.

    Discharge Earth
    Another useful offensive Elemental, Earth deals 4% damage upon hitting an opponent and big knockback accompanying it, throwing opponents horizontally with the force to KO at 120% and above. Outside of Element Burst, this is Melia’s highest knockback Elemental and one of her best for killing potential out of her whole movepool.

    Element Burst
    While in Element Burst mode, Melia’s Earth discharge gains the ability to inflict a poison status on opponents, as it does in Xenoblade. This status deals 3% nonflinching damage every half a second the opponent is afflicted, and the opponent is afflicted for a total of three seconds (a total of 18% for those who don’t feel like doing math) before the effect dissipates.

    Special Input - Summon Ice
    ‘Ice!’ With this resounding word, Melia summons a light blue orb of ether, chillingly cold to look at glistening with crystals. While Ice is active, Melia gains a buff against any energy and projectile moves, gaining a protection from damage and knockback of those moves by .1 times for each summoned Ice. Between Summon Ice and Summon Earth, Melia has the opportunity to bolster herself for virtually any opponent, from heavy hitters like Ganondorf to projectile spammers like Ness to those in between like Samus.

    Discharge Ice
    After being struck by ice, opponents will only take 2% damage along with flinch from the impact. As underwhelming as that may seem, opponents hit by this will also be forced to endure the chill condition. In this state, indicated by a light blue tint on the opponent, the target will take 3% damage every second over the course of four seconds. What makes this different from the Element Burst form of Summon Earth is that chill can be used far more frequently than poison as Melia does not need to be in Element Burst mode to utilize it.

    Element Burst
    The damage dealt by the initial strike of Discharge Ice is increased to 4%, which still isn’t amazing given the damage of other ether Elementals especially in Element Burst mode. The chill damage does not change, but the time is extended to five seconds, and the damage is changed to flinching damage. One of Melia’s most useful Elementals in Element Burst, this causes the opponent to flinch every second, preventing any respectable approach by opponents, adding a lot to Melia’s space game.

    Movement Input - Summon Wind
    Melia cries out ‘Wind!’ with every bit of royal essence she can as a green orb of turbulent Wind ether is expelled from her staff. While Wind is active, Melia’s Speed stats and Jump stats are raised by .633 levels for each Wind Elemental out. To make imagining it easier, with three Winds out, Melia has her speed and jump stats essentially increased by two levels, making her more agile and allowing her to space from opponents with greater ease.

    Discharge Wind
    Upon hitting an opponent Wind will deal 4% damage without any knockback, flinch, or stun. Instead, Wind will push opponents like, well, a windbox, carrying opponents away from Melia a Battlefield Platform or until they reach the edge of a platform. Extremely useful for spacing which, as will be explained constantly throughout the moveset, is essential for Melia’s main playstyles. Against aerial opponents Discharge Wind is even more useful as it will always push the opponent a Battlefield Platform even if it sends them over an edge.

    Element Burst
    In Element Burst, the damage of Wind is raised to 6% and the push from the windbox, or windball as it is, is increased by an additional half a Battlefield Platform. Additionally, after striking one opponent, four green ‘blades’ of wind will fly out from them, pushing other opponents away and dealing 6% damage as well. These blades don’t push opponents nearly as far, only half a Battlefield Platform.

    Up Special - Spear Break
    Melia plants one foot defiantely forward, bracing herself for her attack. The Crown Princess lifts her staff into the air inspiringly before pulling it horizontally at her side, as with a pool cue for a lack of a more regal description. Melia leans back before stabbing the staff forward in a spear-like manner, hence the name of the attack, extending in front of Melia almost half of a Battlefield Platform. This motion is accompanied by Melia shouting ‘Spear Break!’ with great vigor. Opponents struck by this move take 7% damage and are not knocked back but instead ‘scooted’, pushed away from Melia the distance of half a Battlefield Platform. Clearly, there is extremely limited killing potential and the damage is not spectacular, so what use does Spear Break have for Melia? Well, it certainly plays into the Crown Princess’s strategy of keeping the opponent away, but it also sets her up for a follow-up combo with her next move in the set, Starlight Kick. It is also useful for positioning opponents in case Melia has traps such as a Pitfall Trap or Motion Sensor Bomb out, it certainly would be convenient for her to have some sort of trapping move that played into this, wouldn’t it?

    On the aerial side of things, Melia will stab straight into the air above her with her staff, lifting her up four crates of distance, and opponents struck by her staff will take 8% damage and be knocked away. While Melia is unable to combo this into Starlight Kick as the combo requires her to be on the ground, pressing an attack button at the end of this move will cause Melia to put one foot out and kick downward, piercing the air rapidly as she travels to the ground at a 45 degree angle. This keep deals more damage, 9%, upon hitting opponents, and can KO starting at 120%, but Melia cannot cancel the second part of the move, and if she is careless, this can lead to her demise.


    Side Special - Starlight Kick
    When used on the ground, Melia runs forward yelling ‘Starlight…’ with her spear in both hands. Melia drops to the ground to perform a sliding kick, which she announces by finishing her attack call with a shout of ‘Kick!’. Melia slides forward half of a Battlefield Platform in distance, similar to the striking distance of Spear Break. Should Melia hit an opponent, they will suffer 5% damage and be toppled, read in Smash Bros. terms as tripped. While it doesn’t last long, it’s enough time for Melia to stand back up without fear of a counterattack. As mentioned in Spear Break, Starlight Kick can be used as part of a combo, and should Melia use this move immediately after Spear Break, she will instead shout ‘Aha! A weak spot!’ and continues to perform a sliding kick. However, upon hitting the opponent again, Melia will push herself off the ground with her staff slightly as she kicks the target. This deals more damage at 8% and launches opponents upwards, able to kill at 115% and above. Melia then falls back to the ground before she gets back up, meaning it takes longer for her to recover from the attack. A useful combo to finish off an opponent, but Melia can be punished should she miss as she is helpless for quite a while during the animation.

    Down Special - Shadow Stitch / Burst End
    Melia shouts ‘Shadow…’ as she springs backwards a fourth of a Battlefield Platform. Upon landing she points her staff at the ground where she was standing and, with a resounding ‘Stitch!’ she creates a purple seal on the ground. This seal is about as wide as a crate, and after it is formed it will quickly vanish and become invisible. The seal lasts fifteen seconds before it disappears on its own, but if an opponent touches it or Melia uses this move again it will also dissipate. Should an opponent touch this seal, they will be surrounded by a purple cylinder of ether as they are bound in place. The opponent is still able to attack, shield, taunt, and all that good stuff but they are prevented from moving or jumping. Characters will still perform their movement animations but will cover zero distance through the duration of Shadow Stitch. Opponents are bound for two seconds before the seal vanishes. As mentioned, moves like Spear Break and Wind Discharge allow Melia to set opponents up in a Shadow Stitch. While it deals no damage, Shadow Stitch plays into Melia’s style greatly, allowing her distance herself from the opponent and halt any approaches opponents may attempt.

    Should Melia be in Element Burst mode, she loses access to Shadow Stitch and has it replaced with Burst End. When Melia uses Burst End, she lifts slightly off the ground like a certain biblical figure. A cloud of brilliant multicolored ether bursts outward from her, stretching the radius of a Smart Bomb explosion. Opponents struck by this cloud take 15% non-flinching damage, without knockback or any pushing at all. Burst End has a unique effect among Melia’s moves, and every opponent caught in the burst will be temporarily debuffed based on the Elementals Melia currently has. Every buff that Melia is provided by her Elementals is reversed for the opponent, so with two Bolts summoned the opponent has all of their energy and projectile attacks reduced by 40% of their damage and knockback. The duration of these debuffs is inversely proportional to the number of Elementals Melia has out, so with three the debuffs will only last 3 seconds, with two Elementals the debuffs will last 5 seconds, and with only one Elemental the debuff will last 7 seconds. While Melia does not have access to Burst End all the time, when she does it is a useful move for nerfing opponents and setting her up for a kill.

    Standards
    Jab - Elemental Orbit
    Melia jabs her staff forward forcefully, grunting as she does so. Opponents struck by the staff will take 5% damage and be knocked backwards slightly. Alone, this move does little to opponents, simply poking them from afar, but should Melia have any of her Elementals active, the move becomes more interesting. Each press of the Jab will cause the Elementals to hover at the end of her staff, rotating about it like an axis. Opponents struck by the elementals will take 2% flinching damage per hit, the damage dealt in whichever element the Elemental that struck them was formed.While still a weak move, there is some utility to this move as well, as a glance at the HUD will reveal that each use of the Jab will rotate the Elementals on the HUD around counterclockwise once. This has meaning more than just a cosmetic change, as Elemental Discharge will fire whichever Elemental is in the bottom slot, and Melia’s Smashes are dependant on the last Elemental summoned.

    Forward Tilt - Passion of Flame
    Melia plunges her staff forward with gusto, chanting “Star-searing flames of absolution!” The initial thrust of the staff strikes opponents for 8% damage and mediocre knockback, starting to KO at 195% and higher. After a fraction of a second, the tip of the staff ignites with fire ether that hits opponent for rapid 2% flinching damage. This effect lasts for only a short time, but the lingering nature of the move can either help or hurt Melia on a whiff, as opponents may run the risk of running into the flaming staff, but Melia also leaves herself open to a counterattack simultaneously. Should Melia be under the effects of Element Burst, rather than the staff igniting it will explode at the end of Melia’s attack, dealing 14% damage instead of the standard 8%, and lowering the KO threshold to 125%. Element Burst F-Tilt is an excellent killing move for Melia, but is still punishable on a whiff, even more so without the lingering hitbox of the flames, so players ought make sure the move hits. Luckily, between moves like Spear Break and Shadow Stitch, Melia has the tools she needs in order to keep opponents where they need to be. The actual striking of the move counts as a physical move, while both the ignition and explosion aspects of the move count as ether attacks when buffs are up.

    Up Tilt - Power of Earth
    Melia stabs her staff into the ground next to her, shouting “Succumb to the power of earth!”. As she does so, Melia swings her staff in a wide arc above her, creating a long hitbox range that works excellently against aerial foes. Opponents who are struck during this arc will take 10% damage and be thrown upwards, beginning to KO at 190%. While a useful move thanks to its range, it’s also one of Melia’s longer standards, and puts her at risk for being attacked during it. If Melia is in Element Burst, after she stabs her staff into the ground Earth Ether will collect around it, creating a boulder that encompasses the head of the staff. With this, the damage on the attack increases up to 18%, and will start to KO at 130% and higher. While significantly more powerful in Element Burst, it is also slower as it travels through the air. In some cases, this may be good and allow Melia to play with the different speeds to mess with opponents, but most of the time the slower movement results in a harder to hit move, as well as a longer period of being unable to counterattack from the sides. Both the staff and the stone are considered physical attacks.

    Down Tilt - Electric Shock
    Melia takes her staff in both hands, shouting “I can feel the power of thunder!” Melia then promptly, while facing the camera, stabs the ground with her staff. From this point, a visible yellow ring pulses outward from Melia along the ground. This electric pulse travels a half a crate’s worth of distance on either side of Melia before dissipating. Opponents struck by this pulse will take 9% damage with a brief moment hitstun but no knockback, useful for damage dealing as well as halting ground approaches. Of course, no knockback means no killing potential, and only ground-bound foes are struck by the move, and simply jumping will keep aggressors out of reach of Melia’s electric attack. To help combat the shortcomings of this attack, Element Burst changes a few things about the attack. Not only does the radius of the pulse extend from half a crate to a full crate, but at the end of the attack two thin arcs of lightning shoot from the edges of the pulse back into Melia’s staff, creating an electric circuit. Only the pulse’s radius is buffed by Element Burst, with damage and hitstun remaining constant with the regular variation of the attack. However, opponents that come in contact with the secondary arcs of electricity will take 13% damage and be launched away from the lightning, starting to KO at 145%. Should Melia be struck while using this attack, the pulse will continue on its own, but no electric arcs will form. As with her other tilts, this move is lengthy, but leaves Melia much less vulnerable, at least in Element Burst. As one might expect all aspects of this move are calculated as ether damage.

    Dash - Whisper of the Wind
    Melia grunts and grabs the base of her staff with both hands as she dashes. Melia then begins spinning around, with her staff extended, creating a disjointed and rapid hitbox. As Melia spins she will draw her staff back towards her when facing the opposite direction of her motion. Melia will subsequently thrust the staff forward as she turns back around, so she is only capable of hitting opponents who are in front of her. Melia will spin around three times while moving, each spin slowing her momentum so she covers less distance during the course of the attack, covering one and a half crates in the first spin, one crate in the second, and half a crate in the final spin. Each hit deals 5% damage, with the first two strikes having little knockback to aid in comboing with this move, though at high percentages opponents may escape, as well as light fighters like Jigglypuff. The final hit will instead send opponents flying back, starting to KO opponents at 155%. While a strong move, missing an opponent, especially thanks to the average dash speed, can mess up Melia’s momentum compared to other Dash Attacks, as she is unable to cancel out of it once she has started.

    Once again, Element Burst comes into play here, and should Melia use her Dash she will instead lift her staff an upward angle as green wind ether streams from it. Once again, Melia will start spinning, and as she does so the ether will swirl around her into a translucent cyclone which carries her forward. Since Melia is being magically carried forward she will not lose distance on her spins, traveling a crate and a half on each one. However, Melia still will only travel forward for three spins. The cyclone, should it touch opponents, will also deal 5% damage but rather than giving knockback it will simply push opponents along the ground a short distance as they flinch. This distance is not so short that Melia can rapidly combo them but short enough that they can be easily struck by the second part of the attack, explained in the following. After traveling for three spins, the cyclone dissipates from around her and she thrusts her staff forward, striking opponents for 10% damage and launching them with the force to KO foes at 130%. Additionally, Melia can end the move after any spin by pressing the standard input again, which will cause her to stab forward at the next available opportunity. However, even with as great as the Dash Attack is in Element Burst it still suffers from certain scenarios. First off, Melia has to travel a minimum of one and a half crates in one direction even after cutting the move short, which can take her the wrong direction from hitting the enemy. Additionally, projectiles and disjointed attacks will quickly stop Melia’s attack and leave her vulnerable. Still, a versatile move that can definitely pack a punch. Staff-based parts of the move are, of course, physical, while the cyclone counts as an ether attack.

    Smashes
    Forward Smash - Awakening Strike
    During the charge animation for this attack, Melia takes a stance similar to her billards-esque one from Spear Break. Meanwhile, if Melia has any Elementals summoned the one on the bottom will swirl around in front of Melia’s line of fire (or ice, or earth, ohoho), and if only two Elementals are out, then the one on the right will move in front of Melia, and the same goes for the one positioned on the right if Melia only has one Elemental out. Of course, Melia can perform this move, as well as her other Smashes, even without Elementals, though she gains no specific benefit from doing as such. Upon release of the move, Melia stabs her staff forward, visually similar to Spear Break once again. However, in addition to the damage which ranges up to 13% at full charge, this move will actually deal knockback, launching opponents with the force to KO at 165% and higher. Aside from the straight-forward nature of the attack and actually being fairly seemless to launch unlike the rest of Melia’s moveset, this move seems rather weak and innocuous. However, this is the description of the move without any Elementals active. Upon release, while an Elemental is active and in front of Melia, the staff will collide with the orb, altering this move’s characteristics accordingly.

    Should Melia strike a Bolt Elemental, her staff becomes charged with electric ether, which surrounds the staff in an electric aura. Upon striking an opponent, the maximum damage they will take is boosted up to 17%, with KO potential raised to the 150%+ range. This is the most powerful form of Melia’s Forward Smash outside of Element Burst, and is an excellent way to rack up damage on opponents. If Melia strikes a Flare Elemental, her staff ignites in a blaze of glory, which raises the damage on the attack up to 15% and the knockback to 155%+. More importantly, Melia’s flaming staff will shred shields similarly to Marth’s Shield Breaker, adding offensive pressure to Melia’s set and adding general versatility to the move. Should Melia strike an Earth Elemental, her staff will be engulfed in thick rock, similar to her Up Tilt. With her staff like this, the damage cap on the attack is once again lifted to 15%, but the knockback gains a huge buff, able to KO at 100% at full charge. Extremely useful for Melia as the opponent’s damage raises, and late game Melia will want Earth Elementals out anyways to help keep her alive at the same time. After coming in contact with an Ice Elemental, Melia’s staff will sparkle a bone-chilling icy blue as she lunges forward, indicating the blisteringly cold nature of the attack. Upon impact opponents will take up to 13% damage, not improved from the original form of this attack, and the same goes for the knockback, sticking to the original 165%+. However, opponents struck will be afflicted with the chill status as mentioned earlier, taking 3% damage every second for a total of two seconds. Not the best out of Melia’s Forward Smash options, it still has its uses and can be used to keep damage on foes even as they shield. Finally, should Melia hit a Wind Elemental her staff will stream with green ether and her attack will gain a slight damage buff, capping at 15% and sending opponents away with the force to KO at 150% and higher. Additionally, Melia will slide forward along the ground the distance of two crates while maintaining this stance, greatly extending the range she can strike from. Naturally, using a Smash with an Elemental active will use up that Elemental as if discharging it.

    Of course, this move wouldn’t be complete without discussing the effects that Element Burst have on it! Similarly to how this Smash (and the other two listed below) uses up Elementals to buff the attacks, the Smashes will also use up Element Burst entirely when used, which should inspire more use of tilts when in Element Burst unless a KO is very possible. Under the effects of Element Burst, a Bolt-amplified Forward Smash becomes even more powerful, capable of dealing up to 21% in damage. Additionally, the foe will be paralyzed for half a second, similar to Zero Suit Samus’ Paralyzer, which allows Melia to follow up with a second attack (which will have a higher chance of KOing thanks to the massive damage). Should Melia strike a Flare Elemental while in Element Burst, the eruption of flames surrounding her spear will do 18% damage at max charge, and starts KOing at 120%. In addition to destroying shields, upon hitting an opponent their shield will suffer two seconds of ‘shield burn’ as described in the Discharge Flare section above, adding even more pressure to opponents. Element Burst-boosted Earth Elemental Forward Smash will experience a massive boost to knockback, able to KO as low 85%, with damage boosted to 17% as well. One of Melia’s best killing moves period. After striking an Ice Elemental in Element Burst, the damage will once again raise to 17%, and contact with an opponent will not only inflict three seconds of Chill to the opponent but will freeze them for a moment, another useful move for stopping the opponent and preparing a strike on them. Finally, while Melia is in Element Burst and she uses a Wind Elemental in this attack, she will launch forward three crates while striking, creating a massive range to attack with. Additionally, damage is lifted to 17%, and knockback allows Melia to KO at 125% and higher. All parts of this move are counted as physical moves for damage calculation.

    Up Smash - Amplified Ether
    Melia, while charging this move, faces the camera and holds her staff at an angle behind her, while she clenches a fist in front of herself. After being released, Melia will throw her hand up into the air, open-palmed in a very magical girl pose. If Melia has no Elementals up, this is the extent of the attack, and Melia will deal up to 11% damage with her hand, and throws opponents upwards with the force to KO at 150% and higher. Naturally, having Elementals up will add interest to this move, and Melia’s last summoned Elemental will float above Melia as she charges this attack.

    When Melia launches her attack with a Bolt Elemental, an orb of stat electricity replaces the Elemental. This orb will linger for half a second, and is roughly the size of Kirby. The orb will deal a maximum of 16% damage, launching opponents away with enough force to KO at 135% and higher at max charge. With a Flare Elemental, as Melia releases her hand and launches her hand upward, the Elemental will turn into a wide cone of intense flame, extending from a single point upwards into a width of one Battlefield Platform, and a short height just less than that of Kirby. This cone will hit opponents for 14% maximum, and can begin KOing at 125% and higher. The Flare form of this attack is much easier to hit than the Bolt form as it has a wider radius, but the cone doesn’t linger like the orb of electricity does. If Melia uses this move with an Earth Elemental out, it will transform into a jagged stone facing upwards, similar to a crown. This move doesn’t have the same range as the previous two versions of the move, but it makes up for it in knockback, able to KO at 105% and higher, excellent for taking out aerial opponents. However, the damage is only increased to 14%. Having an Ice Elemental out as Melia throws her hand in the air will create a shower of frozen shards of ice that launch upwards. The volley consists of 4 small shards of ice that fan out as they move, each one dealing 4% damage and slight hitstun. Hitting opponents near the beginning of this attack is better, as they are likely to be comboed and, if Melia is lucky, all shards will hit the opponent, dealing out a total of 16% damage. However, while Melia may not hit with every shard, it is very likely that at least one shard will strike opponents thanks to how they fan out. Finally, while Melia’s last summoned Elemental is Wind, she will create a jet stream as she throws her hand in the air. This jet stream, indicated by wispy green ether flying upwards, creates a column of wind about Ganondorf’s height that damages foes for up to 14% damage and throwing them into the air like the windbox it is. While this isn’t immediately useful for KOing, it does keep the opponent up in the air should Melia want to follow up with a second Up Smash or move onto her Aerials (more on them later, of course!).

    You know what time it is now: Element Burst! While in this state, Melia’s Bolt variation of this Smash will increase damage even further, capping at 20% damage and KOing opponents at 120%+. Additionally, the orb of electricity will shoot arcs of electricity to enemies within a certain range, a crate in radius. These bolts of lightning will deal up to 14% damage and also launch opponents away, starting to KO at 150%. While these additional arcs do not carry as much power as the initial portion of the attack, it is beneficial as it has excellent range and can strike opponents even on a whiff. Element Burst will turn the Flare version of this move into a skyward heatwave, a semi-cone that travels up a crate’s worth of space. Additionally, opponents will take an increased 16% damage and knockback that can start KOing opponents at 115% and higher. While Bolt has a wider range thanks to the arcing electricity, the Flare variation has a higher damage for the range, as the attack is all in one part. The Earth variation of this Smash, while enhanced by Element Burst, will not become a piece of jagged stone but instead a piece of jagged crystal. This crystal, though it retains the same properties as the stone, will instead deal up to 17% damage and can KO at as low as 95% damage, making it another excellent killing move. Ice, under the effects of Element Burst, will create an additional shard of ice and raise the damage on each shard to 5%, increasing the maximum damage from the attack to 25% from the original 16%. The shards will also inflict two seconds of chill as well, adding to the versatility of this move. Finally, Wind affected by Element Burst will have range increased to one and a half Ganons, and damage will increase to 17%. Additionally, opponents will have their gravity decreased by 30% until they touch the ground again or are struck, which allows Melia to follow up as she wishes or to use the momentary break to replenish her Elementals. All parts of this move, except for the default without Elementals, are considered ether attacks for damage calculation.

    Down Smash - Arcane Aura
    Melia lifts her staff above her head like a club as she charges this attack. Once released, if Melia has no Elementals active, she will smack her staff on the ground in front of her, again, like a club. At full charge, opponents will take 14% from the strike and be launched back with killing force of 155% and higher. At this point, the next step should be old hat, and if Melia has Elementals active the last one will float in front of her, resting on the ground. Melia’s Smash will then activate the ether in the Elemental as it strikes it, and functions as follows.

    Should Melia have summoned a Bolt Elemental last, a cackling spark of electricity will erupt from the ground, creating a small semisphere of lightning in front of the crown princess. Opponents struck by this move are electrified, taking upwards of 19% damage and being launched back, starting to KO at max charge at 145% damage. With a Flare Elemental, Melia’s attack will create a pyre in front of her, igniting foes for up to 15% damage while inflicting the burn status on their shield for two seconds, and the explosive force of the flames will throw opponents back with the force to KO at 130% and above. Earth Elemental will cause a rock formation to erupt from the ground, roughly the size of Kirby, and this formation will strike opponents for upwards 15% damage with the knockback to send opponents offscreen at 115% and above. Ice produces a similar effect to Earth, though instead of rock erupting from the ground, crystals of ice will instead grow up from the ground, also hitting opponents for 15% damage but also freezing them in solid ice. This can be useful for a follow up attack, such as the Forward Smash, while the opponent is helpless. Finally, a Wind Elemental will create a very small tornado that grows upwards from the ground, buffeting opponents rapidly for damage between 3% to 6% damage per hit, with hitstun. The tornado can hit multiple times, up to four times if the opponent is properly trapped, dealing a max damage of 24%. A very useful attack when used in coordination with Shadow Stitch to keep the opponent in place. Unlike the other two Smashes, the Down Smash does not gain damage or power through Element Burst. Instead, an opponent being struck by this move during Element Burst will receive a debuff, as with Burst End, but specialized to the Elemental used for the attack. Bolt will lower opponent’s projectile and non-physical damage and knockback by a degree of .2, Flare will reduce physical damage and knockback by a degree of .2, Earth will increase the physical damage opponents take by .1, Ice will increase the projectile and non-physical damage opponents take by .1, and Wind will lower the opponent’s speed by two thirds of a speed level. This can be a nice alternative to Burst End, as while it doesn’t apply all debuffs at once often times Melia will want Elementals after she attacks, and she will only lose one in the process of this attack. Additionally, this attack has more options for damage and a greater killing potential than Burst End, so the choice is up to the player. All parts of this move, aside from the Elemental-less staff variation, are counted as ether moves.

    Aerials
    Neutral Aerial - Summon Aqua
    Melia waves her staff in the air around her, and as she does so she yells “Feel the tide of battle!” Simultaneously, a blue ring of Aqua ether expands outward from her, though the distance it travels is diminutive. The ring will pulse outward a distance equal to another Melia on either side, useful for forcing opponents away more so than offense. Opponents hit by this ring will suffer 9% damage and be pushed away from Melia, giving her space should an enemy be breathing down her neck. Additionally, Element Burst adds to this move, and in addition to the range increasing to two Melias on either side, the move gains a damage buff to 12% on a hit with an enemy. The more interesting part of this move is that, in Element Burst, striking an opponent will allow Melia to “steal” life from them, regaining 4% of her health after damaging them. This can be very useful as a non-traditional way to punish your opponents, turning their momentum into your health.

    Forward Aerial - Summon Copy
    Melia points her staff forward, shouting “Summon Copy!”. This attack, similar to the Smashes, has a default variation for if Melia has not summoned any Elementals this stock, and her pointing her staff forward will damage opponents for 11% and knock them away, starting to KO at 175% damage. Of course, Melia won’t shout “Summon Copy!” if she is using the default variation, as that would sound silly. Duh. If Melia has summoned an Elemental this stock, however, whatever Elemental she last summoned will spawn in front of her and immediately launch forward through the air, similar to Villager’s slingshot aerial. Each Elemental will travel two crates forward at Mario’s dash speed before dissipating. Bolt Elemental will do the most damage upon hitting an opponent, 16%, and will begin knocking them out at 165%. Flare deals 14% and KOs at 150%, while Earth will only deal 13% but will spike any opponent it hits. Both Ice and Wind will deal 13% as well, but Ice will cause opponents to move slower upon being struck for a grand second, allowing Melia to follow up as she wishes, while Wind will launch opponents straight up into the air, able to KO at 145% and above. Under the effects of Element Burst, each Elemental will deal the same damage with the same effect, however, at the end of an Elemental’s trajectory, or after hitting an opponent, the Elemental will detonate into a Hothead-sized burst of ether, expanding the hitbox greatly.

    Up Aerial - Burning Arc
    Melia swings her staff in the air above her head in a wide arc, during which her staff’s head catches fire with ether, creating a wide hitbox of flame. Opponents who are struck will take 14% damage and be knocked into the air with alright killing potential, knocking out foes 165% and above. While not an exceptional move, it stands out in Melia’s movesets as one of her easiest and quickest moves to use, as many of her other moves are lengthy to pull off or easily punishable on a miss. One of Melia’s most reliable ways to gain KOs are by knocking opponents into the air and following up with this move, and this is a trait shared with her Back and Down Aerials as well. Naturally, like the majority of Melia’s moves, Element Burst plays into this and will cause Melia to create a chain of three small explosions from her staff rather than fire. While the explosions are harder to hit with as they are not one continuous hitbox, the explosions deal more damage, 18%, and can KO opponents at damages of 145% and above, while still being a reliable move for the crown princess.

    Back Aerial - Back Stab
    One of Melia’s fastest moves period, she simply takes her staff and jams it under her arm behind her, jabbing opponents with the butt of her staff. Opponents will suffer 11% damage from the forceful thrust and be knocked away, leaving the stage at 170% and higher. Again, this attack may not have the grandeur of some of her other moves but its utility should not be understated. Melia can strike very fast and suddenly, a trait that, while shared with these few aerials, is relatively unseen in the rest of her moveset, and can even surprise opponents unprepared for it. During Element Burst, Melia’s staff will begin emitting wind ether, and this ether will push her backwards through the power of wind, not only allowing her to move through the air while attacking (though she still falls towards the ground through gravity) but will also power up her jab, increasing the damage to 15% and KOing at, like the Up Aerials, 145% and above.

    Down Aerial - Meteor Strike
    Another quick move, Melia takes her staff and jams it straight down, striking any opponents directly under her with the back end of the staff as with the Back Aerial. Opponents struck by this will take 12% damage and be knocked into their helpless state. The speed of this attack does make it helpful for Melia’s set of course, as she needs the speed in her moves somewhere, but there seems to be little killing potential which limits how useful it truly is. But wait, isn’t the name of the move Meteor Strike? It almost seems like it should meteor smash opponents… ah that’s right, Element Burst! Element Burst will cause Melia’s staff to glow a dull orange, flowing with earth ether, and this cranks up the damage to 16% and will, as the name suggests, will meteor smash opponents struck by it. Pretty nifty, and a very useful gimping tool! However, the base of the staff is thin, and Melia has to be precise to hit with it consistently.

    Grab (No Elementals)
    Melia’s grab is simple if she has no Elementals out, as she will simply reach forward with her free hand and grab the opponent. Quick but short-ranged, it’s a generic but effective grab. For her pummel, Melia will bonk the opponent with her staff for 3% damage. This pummel is not the fastest, but it does get the job done.

    Forward Throw - Staff Smash
    Melia releases the opponent for a brief moment as she grabs her staff in both hands. Melia then swings her staff as though it were a baseball bat, smacking the foe square and launching them away. Opponents will take 7% damage and has moderate knockback, allowing Melia to put some space between her and the foe. Most of Melia’s throws without Elementals revolve around spacing the opponent away, giving her the opportunity to pull up Elementals should she need them.

    Up Throw - Imperial Flip
    Melia releases the foe from her grip, allowing them to fall to the ground and causing them to take 3% damage. Melia then jams her staff underneath the foe and flips them as though she were using a shovel. This portion of the move deals an extra 5% damage and launches the opponent straight into the air. This allows Melia to follow up with one of her aerials if she desires, the Up Aerial working especially well. Of course, Melia could also use this opportunity to bring up an Elemental, charge a Smash, or even just generically space herself from the opponent.

    Back Throw - Spiral Kick
    Melia spins around with opponent one time, letting them go as they face the opposite direction. Melia spins around a second time, lifting her leg up as she does so. Melia then follows through with her spin a second time, kicking the opponent roughly and finishing her spin by facing the direction she started. The kick will strike opponents for 7% damage and knock them an adequate distance away from Melia, perfect for summoning Elementals in the meantime.

    Down Throw - Eryth Elbow Drop
    Melia drops the opponent on the ground, similar to her Up Throw, causing the opponent to take 3% damage. Melia then jabs her staff into the opponent’s body and lifts herself up, proceeding to promptly slide down the staff elbow first. Upon striking them, the opponent will take an additional 7% damage, ultimately dealing 10% when everything's said and done, making this her most powerful throw without access to Elementals. However, unlike her other throws, this throw has low knockback, making it a more offensive tactic and less useful for bolstering Melia with Elementals.

    Grab (Elementals)
    As with most of Melia’s set, Elementals add a new angle on Melia’s grab game. Instead of physically grabbing the foe, Melia will wave her hand as her Elementals fly forward and, hopefully, encircle an opponent. This grab has a greater range than Melia’s other grab, but trades off speed, making it a laggier and easier to anticipate grab. Additionally, this grab has varying grab strength, depending on the number of Elementals that Melia has out when she uses the grab. With only one Elemental out, Melia’s grab has .75 strength, and is extremely easy to break free from. With two Elementals, Melia’s grab has average strength, nothing more and nothing less. Finally, as one might see coming, with three Elementals out Melia will have a 1.25 grab strength, very nice indeed. Melia’s pummel will cause an Elemental to dart inward and ram the opponent. Each Elemental will deal 3% damage on a pummel, and the speed at which Melia can pummel is also based on how many Elementals she has out. With one out, only one Elemental can pummel the opponent (obviously), so the pummel is slow, and combined with the weak grab strength Melia is better off not pummeling the opponent. The more Elementals Melia has out, the faster she can pummel, and with three Elementals out and an increased grab strength Melia is capable of high damage with her pummel. This is a slow grab, however, and Melia may have trouble landing this grab without debuffing the opponent’s speed or trapping them with Shadow Stitch.

    Forward Throw - Elemental Beat Down
    All of Melia’s active Elementals retreat from the opponent before individually pounding into the opponent. Each Elemental will deal 4% damage, and, naturally, the more Elementals Melia the more damage this move can do, dealing 12% for three Elementals. The last Elemental will also throw opponents back weakly, allowing her to chase down with a Smash attack or even a tilt, depending on how much damage the opponent has on them.

    Up Throw - Elemental Cyclone
    Melia’s Elementals will rotate rapidly around the opponent, buffeting them as they lift them into the air. Once again, this throw deals more damage with more Elementals out, dealing between 3% and 9% damage. At the end of the attack, the Elementals will fling the opponent into the air with moderate knockback, an excellent setup for Melia to follow up with one of her fast Aerials.

    Back Throw - Elemental Run
    Melia’s Elementals pull the opponent forward slightly, before flying straight towards Melia. Meanwhile, Melia has adjusted her staff into a lance-like position, ready to spear the opponent. Indeed, the opponent will be pulled into the staff and past Melia, dealing a solid 8% damage as the opponent is thrown behind Melia. The throw doesn’t have superb knockback but it does open an opportunity for Melia to space herself from the foe.

    Down Throw - Elemental Barrage
    Melia waves her hand and her Elementals knock the opponent on the ground, though unlike her previous throws that worked like this the foe does not take damage. Afterwards, the Elementals fly into the air and, one by one, smash into the foe and dealing 3% damage per hit. This allows Melia to deal 9% damage total with this move, but the throw has poor knockback, and gives her little opportunity to set up another attack or Elemental. However, Melia can use the poor knockback to position opponents into one of her Shadow Stitches, which does allow her to follow up with a strong attack.

    Final Smash
    Mind Blast
    [​IMG]
    Melia’s strongest Talent Art, normally only available in Element Burst in Xenoblade, Melia lifts her staff in the air and holds her hand out in front of her. A cone of golden ether erupts forward and fans out, creating a wide radius in which to grab opponents, as well as dealing 25% damage. Opponents struck by Mind Blast will be frozen in place, and this allows Melia to follow up with a short cutscene. Melia waves her hand and one of every Elemental is summoned, which then promptly fly toward the opponent, pelting them for 4% damage each. Finally, Melia lunges forward with her staff, using Spear Break to deal 10% damage and following up with a Starlight Kick to deal another 10% damage and massive knockback, capable of KOing at 80% and higher.

    Playstyle
    [​IMG]
    At first glance, Melia may seem absurdly powerful, with most of her attacks dealing double digit damage combined with the buffs she gains through her Elementals and the huge power that Element Burst gives her. Indeed, some, such as Jamie, may take issue with every move being a ‘special snowflake’ of a move, and almost all of Melia’s moves have special additional effects depending on if Melia is in Element Burst or not. However, Melia is royalty, and as such most of her attacks are designed to be grand and extravagant to reflect her royal persona. This holds both good and bad influences on Melia’s moveset. On one hand, Melia’s moves tend to be powerful, and often have good effects when combined with Elementals and Element Burst, which can be appealing. However, Melia also has trouble landing her almost theatrical attacks, as one could notice that most of Melia’s moves are slow or have long animations, and Melia does not have the weight, even with Earth Elementals active, to take the hits that normally slow and heavy characters can.

    Obviously, Melia’s playstyle revolves around keeping Elementals out. Bolt and Flare are Melia’s most important Elementals, allowing her to crank up her damage output so every attack counts more. However, Melia will have a difficult time killing foes without invoking Element Burst, and this means she will have to discharge several Elementals to get in this state. Melia will want to utilize her tilts and aerials as much as she can in Element Burst as these will not drain her of her energy, unlike Discharge, Burst End, and her Smashes. However, Melia will be even more vulnerable during Element Burst, so players must work around Melia’s weakness as they fight opponents. Should Melia be in a position where she has no Elementals, and is being pressured badly by the opponent, Melia has a few tools that can give her the space she needs. First off, Melia has Spear Break, which allows her to force opponents away. Of course, because Spear Break does not deal knockback opponents can head straight back to Melia, so she should utilize her other spacing Special, Shadow Stitch, which will ensnare opponents and give Melia the opportunity to pull her Elementals out. Melia’s throws without Elementals are also useful for spacing and setting up Elementals, designed to minimize Melia’s struggle without them during the fight. Melia’s strategy revolves around stage control and buffing herself until she can get Element Burst up, which gives her several options to follow up. Debuffing opponents through Burst End or her Down Smash, a powerful killing move with her tilts or other Smashes, or hitting with a powerful status inflicting Elemental can all prove beneficial to Melia during battle. In short, Melia does not like to take damage and may have difficulty hitting opponents in battle, but, with proper stage control and use of her Elementals, Melia’s playstyle can overwhelm unprepared players.

    Flavor
    Entrance - Melia drifts down onto the stage using her wings to slow her descent and, upon landing, brandishes her staff, ready for battle.
    Boxing Ring Title - The Hybrid Empress
    Up Taunt - Melia lifts her staff in the air above her, saying “I can feel the Ether!”