Am I good enough to play Greninja?

Hyjacked

Smash Rookie
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
12
#1
I like Greninja a lot thematically and playing him is pretty fun. However, I have read and heard that he's a very technically demanding character and I've never been good at fiddly inputs in any game, including smash. I'm sure I'm not the only one to be concerned about this kind of thing. In general, do you think someone like me sink the hours into a character that we might never be good at or quit while we're behind and try someone else?
 

DDRC

Smash Apprentice
Joined
Aug 28, 2018
Messages
90
#2
If you like a character play them. You'll learn how to do all the cool tech stuff over time but don't let people scare you off from a character you enjoy playing. Don't worry about not being good enough at the character/wasting time. Tldr just have fun and try to learn Greninja if you enjoy him so much.
 
Joined
Jan 22, 2019
Messages
8
#3
If you like a character play them. You'll learn how to do all the cool tech stuff over time but don't let people scare you off from a character you enjoy playing. Don't worry about not being good enough at the character/wasting time. Tldr just have fun and try to learn Greninja if you enjoy him so much.
Well said. Practice makes perfect anyway
 

Firox

Smash Champion
Joined
Jan 7, 2019
Messages
2,411
#4
I can definitely say that some of his flashier techs require skill (like perfectly spaced short hop Fairs and drag-down up airs) but he's got some super satisfying combos that are easy to land as well. My favorites are dash attack -> up smash at low percent and dash attack -> up air at mid to high percent. A ludicrously easy kill confirm is Dtilt -> up smash at about 100% against most characters. These three combos alone are very consistent and don't require a lot of skill. The rest of his game is basically mastering his mobility to aim his other attacks which would apply to literally any other character. Give it at least 5 hours practicing these moves and getting a feel for his spacing. If you aren't kickin' it ninja-frog style by then, I guess you could always default to K Rool like everyone else...
 
Joined
Jan 22, 2019
Messages
28
#5
Like others have said, if you enjoy him, play him. When people say a character is "hard" or "technical" to play, they usually mean at the top levels of play, which most people don't need to worry about.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2015
Messages
10
Location
Charlotte, NC
NNID
MasterMicahWH
Switch FC
7765-5492-7400
#6
The best practice is to learn how to play the game. If you think you're going to quit then you're going to quit. If you want a rewarding experience then yes, continue building on your fundamentals. Because I don't know you;

Short hop is as simple as keeping the distance between your button presses as short as possible.
Rolling as a movement option deserves to be punished and will ruin your neutral game.
If your shield is already up, don't react to an aerial by rolling. There is start up to your I-frames so expect to get hit if you do roll away.
For Greninja, Shiek, Z-Samus: Your movement options are superior to your defensive tools. Although Greninja can play agressively with little to stop him, you can also play a trap based style with (a better) counter, d-tilt/f-tilt/jab/(dash) grab, and using fair and shurikens to space opponents. The key here is to piss people off so they go into autopilot.
Speaking of autopilot... ask yourself these questions. Why am I winning? Why did I lose? Am I doing (bad/good habit) out of habit? Am I being predictable? Is my opponent doing/thinking what I want him to?
Recovering under the stage is the safest option statistically speaking.
Spacing yourself near the ledge when others are recovering is only important if you're willing to capitalize on it. Use down smash for rollers and ledge attackers. Use RAR, uair or fair to punish those who jump from ledge. Use ledge gimping to screw with anyone who likes to sit on the ledge and bair to capitalize on those without ledge invincibility.
Hydro Pump is good for confusing people on stage.
FF nair to d-tilt is true in most situations and makes for a great opener.
F-tilt is a stellar spacing tool.
U-tilt is great for for platforms in battlefield and shff-nair/uair is fantastic for whispy woods.
A player may force Shadow Sneak to attack the intended direction manually, but always attempts to attack towards P2 automatically. This is great for if you read a dodge or want to get the backwards SS which does extra knockback.
 
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